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Jorge Carpizo Macgregor

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NEWS
February 2, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As national human rights ombudsman for the last two years, Jorge Carpizo MacGregor branded the attorney general's office and its Federal Judicial Police force the worst rights violators in Mexico. Now, as Mexico's new attorney general, the former president of the National Human Rights Commission is charged with putting an end to the abuses he so often denounced--torture, extortion and even murder.
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NEWS
June 27, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Minister Jorge Carpizo MacGregor on Sunday withdrew his resignation from the Cabinet post that oversees Mexican elections, defusing a crisis that threatened to undermine the credibility of the Aug. 21 presidential poll.
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NEWS
June 27, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Minister Jorge Carpizo MacGregor on Sunday withdrew his resignation from the Cabinet post that oversees Mexican elections, defusing a crisis that threatened to undermine the credibility of the Aug. 21 presidential poll.
NEWS
February 2, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As national human rights ombudsman for the last two years, Jorge Carpizo MacGregor branded the attorney general's office and its Federal Judicial Police force the worst rights violators in Mexico. Now, as Mexico's new attorney general, the former president of the National Human Rights Commission is charged with putting an end to the abuses he so often denounced--torture, extortion and even murder.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Mexico's top mafia chiefs, Emilio Quintero Payan, was shot to death by police in a suburban shopping center on the outskirts of Mexico City, U.S. and Mexican officials confirmed Monday. Quintero Payan, who allegedly ran heroin, cocaine and marijuana smuggling operations from his home state of Sinaloa, was killed Thursday, a day after the former attorney general of Sinaloa was gunned down in a Mexico City park. Officials are still investigating what seem to be links between the two cases.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | Reuters
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, eager to show that August presidential elections will be free of fraud, will propose allowing foreign observers, a spokesman said Tuesday. The proposal, to be made Thursday at election reform talks between Interior Minister Jorge Carpizo MacGregor and political parties, will break a longstanding national taboo against foreign election observers.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | Reuters
The Mexican government and eight political parties signed an agreement Thursday calling for sweeping and unprecedented electoral reforms in an attempt to end a peasant uprising in the southern state of Chiapas. The agreement took a giant step toward meeting one of the central demands of the Zapatista National Liberation Army, which launched a New Year's Day insurgency calling for indigenous rights and political empowerment through clean and just elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993
Good fences make good neighbors. That well-known line doesn't always apply to the border between the United States and Mexico: Like the border between nearly any two countries, our fence has some intentional holes. After all, a good deal of the traffic in both directions is entirely legal, welcome and economically beneficial to both sides.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Two federal agents who disappeared while tracking Mexico's most-wanted suspected cocaine baron have turned up dead in the trunk of a stolen car, authorities said Sunday. As Mexican law enforcement turns up the heat on alleged drug kingpins such as Amado Carrillo Fuentes, the drug traffickers are fighting back. And the list of slain Mexican drug agents is growing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994
It was inevitable that Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari would shake up his government after last week's bloody Indian uprising in the state of Chiapas. But more than political damage control is needed in the wake of a crisis that has tarnished the young Mexican president's reputation both inside Mexico and abroad. After all, the ouster of Interior Minister Patrocinio Gonzalez was an easy call for Salinas.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve the government's human rights image--and possibly its record--President Carlos Salinas de Gortari on Monday replaced his attorney general and his interior secretary, the official who oversees elections and political reform. Salinas also named one of his oldest friends, Emilio Lozoya Thalmann, as secretary of energy and mines, immediately raising speculation about the race to succeed the president in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
Given the traumas Mexico has faced this election year, the minor political melodrama that played itself out last weekend in Mexico City might seem insignificant. It wasn't. It was a defining moment leading up to Mexico's most historic election day since 1910, when a controversial presidential vote set off a major revolution. The weekend crisis began when the popular government minister who will oversee Mexico's elections, Jorge Carpizo MacGregor, threatened to resign.
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