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Jorge Carpizo Macgregor

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
Given the traumas Mexico has faced this election year, the minor political melodrama that played itself out last weekend in Mexico City might seem insignificant. It wasn't. It was a defining moment leading up to Mexico's most historic election day since 1910, when a controversial presidential vote set off a major revolution. The weekend crisis began when the popular government minister who will oversee Mexico's elections, Jorge Carpizo MacGregor, threatened to resign.
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NEWS
March 19, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing pressure from its citizens, epitomized by a Jan. 1 Indian uprising in the southern state of Chiapas, is forcing Mexico's government to match the strides made toward opening the economy with similar advances in the notoriously closed political system.
NEWS
November 20, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A heated controversy has arisen here regarding the Mexican government's purported vow to extradite a suspected rapist to the United States in exchange for a Florida lawmaker's "yes" vote on the North American Free Trade Agreement. Apart from possibly violating Mexican law, critics here say, the reported agreement between Mexican Atty. Gen. Jorge Carpizo MacGregor and U.S. Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. (R-Fla.
WORLD
April 30, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Arellano Felix brothers used the papal nuncio as a personal emissary to request a meeting with President Carlos Salinas de Gortari to plead their innocence in the May 1993 killing of Cardinal Juan Jesus Posadas Ocampo at the Guadalajara airport, according to a new book.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1994 | ROBERT W. BENSON, Robert W. Benson is a professor of law at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. He has been an election observer in Mexico. and
Serious people in Mexico fear that the elections on Aug. 21 will be followed by widespread civil war. The Defense Ministry has bought anti-riot armored trucks and four attack helicopters from the United States, and has deployed several thousand troops to about 10 states, allegedly to pursue drug dealers. The weekly Processo reports that independent guerrilla groups are operating in the states of Puebla, Vera Cruz, Oaxaca, Michoacan and Guerrero.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighting appeared to have halted in southern Mexico on Thursday, but the political fallout from 12 days of guerrilla warfare has barely begun. The uprising that cost more than 100 lives, observers say, is an indictment of a semi-feudal system that has left many Indians feeling powerless, with no way to resolve their problems by peaceful means.
NEWS
December 7, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A suspected drug kingpin, part of a family mob allegedly behind the Guadalajara shootout that left a Roman Catholic cardinal and six others dead last May, has been arrested, federal police announced Monday. Francisco Rafael Arellano Felix, 44, was captured in the northern border city of Tijuana, where he and three brothers allegedly control a lucrative drug business.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The regional chief of the Mexican immigration service in Tijuana and two deputies have been dismissed and charged with corruption in a growing scandal involving an alleged network of Mexican federal officials allied with immigrant smugglers.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican Interior Minister Patrocinio Gonzalez Blanco Garrido, a former governor of the embattled Chiapas state, Monday became the first political casualty of the deadly Indian uprising that has jolted the government of President Carlos Salinas de Gortari. Saying he was acknowledging "that which did not work," Salinas announced that he had accepted Gonzalez's resignation and replaced him with Atty. Gen. Jorge Carpizo MacGregor, a former human rights ombudsman.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Minister Jorge Carpizo MacGregor resigned Friday in a move that undercut the credibility of this nation's planned presidential elections. "I am more than angry, I am indignant and disillusioned," he wrote to President Carlos Salinas de Gortari in a resignation letter in which he accused politicians of lies and libel in connection with preparations for the Aug. 21 vote. "One has to know when to leave. That moment, for dignity and conviction, has arrived."
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