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Jorge Carrillo Olea

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May 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A governor hounded by charges of ties to drug lords and by public outrage at mounting crime and corruption in his state stepped down, denying that he was in league with criminals. Morelos Gov. Jorge Carrillo Olea said he was resigning effective today to quell criticism that reached fever pitch after federal police caught the commander of the state's anti-kidnapping unit and two other officers in January allegedly dumping the tortured body of a kidnapping suspect on a rural road.
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NEWS
May 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A governor hounded by charges of ties to drug lords and by public outrage at mounting crime and corruption in his state stepped down, denying that he was in league with criminals. Morelos Gov. Jorge Carrillo Olea said he was resigning effective today to quell criticism that reached fever pitch after federal police caught the commander of the state's anti-kidnapping unit and two other officers in January allegedly dumping the tortured body of a kidnapping suspect on a rural road.
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NEWS
November 13, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's new drug czar, Jorge Carrillo Olea, has met repeatedly with U.S. officials to reassure them that his appointment does not signal a shift in the country's aggressive anti-narcotics program and coordination with the United States. President Carlos Salinas de Gortari named Carrillo Olea to the top drug post Oct. 15 to replace Javier Coello Trejo, under whose leadership the Federal Judicial Police had captured record quantities of cocaine but reportedly committed widespread human rights abuses.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's new drug czar, Jorge Carrillo Olea, has met repeatedly with U.S. officials to reassure them that his appointment does not signal a shift in the country's aggressive anti-narcotics program and coordination with the United States. President Carlos Salinas de Gortari named Carrillo Olea to the top drug post Oct. 15 to replace Javier Coello Trejo, under whose leadership the Federal Judicial Police had captured record quantities of cocaine but reportedly committed widespread human rights abuses.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The governor of the Mexican state that borders Arizona has deep ties to reputed drug trafficker Amado Carrillo Fuentes, enabling huge quantities of narcotics to pass freely into the United States, according to a report. Manlio Fabio Beltrones Rivera, governor of Sonora, reportedly took part in meetings at which drug lords paid high-ranking politicians protection money, the New York Times reported, citing U.S. officials and intelligence reports. Beltrones denied the allegations.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's controversial drug czar, Javier Coello Trejo, was removed from his post Monday after repeated charges that federal anti-narcotics police under his authority committed widespread human rights abuses. Coello, 42, was named Monday night as federal attorney general for the consumer, a position that officials portrayed as a promotion but which, in reality, is far less powerful than his old job.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was one of the nation's toughest governors, a veteran of top military and drug-fighting jobs. But Morelos state Gov. Jorge Carrillo Olea was defeated this week by an unexpected enemy: opposition parties and an angry public. Carrillo Olea, a prominent figure in the long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned Friday after an unheard-of impeachment procedure got underway against him in his state's Congress.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | JUAN M. VASQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
The reputation of Mexico's police forces, already discredited by tales of corruption and abuse, has been further damaged by continuing disclosures of criminal activity among the ostensible defenders of law and order. President Miguel de la Madrid, who came to office promising to clean up corruption, is finding the task much more difficult than he expected, according to some officials.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what U.S. officials hailed as a significant breakthrough, Mexico permitted the U.S. Customs Service on Friday to resume surveillance flights over its territory aimed at detecting planes smuggling cocaine from Colombia to the United States.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to combat police torture, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari on Tuesday proposed important reforms in the Mexican legal system that would limit the use of confessions from suspected criminals in court. Mexican and international human rights groups, as well as U.S. officials, have denounced the use of torture by police to extract confessions, particularly in drug trafficking cases. The National Human Rights Commission, appointed by Salinas last June, had proposed the changes.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The party that has governed Mexico for nearly seven decades was headed for several bitter defeats Monday in elections in the state of Morelos, setting the stage for a series of midterm polls expected to redraw the nation's political landscape this year.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To U.S. tourists and well-heeled Mexicans, this resort city is a haven of sunny weather, elegant restaurants and riotous gardens of purple and magenta bougainvillea. But in recent years, Cuernavaca has become a haven of a more sinister sort. Kidnappers have sown terror in the city and region, abducting hundreds of people. Drug lords have moved into the walled mansions of the "city of eternal spring." Authorities seemed helpless in the face of chaos. Now Mexicans are learning why.
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