Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJorge Castaneda
IN THE NEWS

Jorge Castaneda

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
August 12, 2001 | SERGIO MUNOZ
For almost 150 years, Mexico's foreign policy was essentially defensive. Nonintervention and self-determination were its twin pillars. Today, as Mexico democratizes and becomes a key player in the global economy, its approach to the world is correspondingly changing. Under President Vicente Fox and his foreign minister, Jorge Castaneda, human rights and democracy have become core values in Mexico's foreign policy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 12, 2006
Re "Mexico, up for grabs," Opinion, May 9 Jorge Castaneda reaches the indefensible conclusion that Mexican President Vicente Fox and candidate Felipe Calderon are "making Mexico's still-in-diapers democracy work." Although it may be correct to characterize the country's politics as infantile, to suggest that Fox and Calderon are democracy's nursemaids is a flimsy claim. Fox's petulant outbursts and arrant self-promotion have done nothing to raise the level of debate. Far from energizing the electorate, the men Castaneda lauds have helped foster a disputatious campaign tone that has alienated much of Mexican society.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 12, 2006
Re "Mexico, up for grabs," Opinion, May 9 Jorge Castaneda reaches the indefensible conclusion that Mexican President Vicente Fox and candidate Felipe Calderon are "making Mexico's still-in-diapers democracy work." Although it may be correct to characterize the country's politics as infantile, to suggest that Fox and Calderon are democracy's nursemaids is a flimsy claim. Fox's petulant outbursts and arrant self-promotion have done nothing to raise the level of debate. Far from energizing the electorate, the men Castaneda lauds have helped foster a disputatious campaign tone that has alienated much of Mexican society.
WORLD
October 28, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
The government announced Thursday that it would not allow maverick politician Jorge Castaneda to run in next year's presidential election as the country's first independent candidate. The decision appeared to end a seven-month crusade in which Castaneda pleaded his case before the Supreme Court, the Federal Electoral Institute and finally the Washington-based Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
The commentary by Jorge Castaneda of May 8 and your editorial of the same day lament Mexico's apparently insurmountable economic problems, which are highlighted by a 50% inflation rate, 2 million people unemployed, an ever-rising crime rate and uncontrollable illegal immigration to the United States. But, neither article nor editorial identifies the cause of the problems or suggests a remedy. Mexicans are victims of Catholic dogma, which forbids them from practicing birth control. As a consequence, their population increased from 17 million in 1930 to 91 million in 1995; it doubled in the last 28 years, and at this rate it is expected to double again in the next 40 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995
Re "Did Someone Say 'I Told You So'?" Commentary, March 7: It is not at all surprising for Jorge Castaneda to be upset about the conditions of the recent financial assistance made to Mexico by the U.S. and others. Many of my friends in Mexico feel their government gave away the store to obtain the badly needed loans. However, this is no reason for Castaneda to verbally attack and try to place the blame on the U.S. for the loan conditions, as the conditions merely reflect the severity of the situation in Mexico.
WORLD
October 19, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could have far-reaching implications for future elections here, an international tribunal has ruled that Mexico's government cannot prevent Jorge Castaneda, a controversial writer and former foreign minister, from mounting an independent campaign for president. The Washington-based Inter-American Commission on Human Rights voted 6 to 1 to request that Mexico adopt "precautionary measures" that would allow Castaneda's name to appear on the ballot in next year's vote.
WORLD
October 28, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
The government announced Thursday that it would not allow maverick politician Jorge Castaneda to run in next year's presidential election as the country's first independent candidate. The decision appeared to end a seven-month crusade in which Castaneda pleaded his case before the Supreme Court, the Federal Electoral Institute and finally the Washington-based Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1988
In reading Jorge Castaneda's column "Mexico, Insulted, Rethinks Its Role in U.S. Drug War" (Op-Ed Page, May 1), your readers might think that everyone in Mexico agrees with Castaneda. Castaneda's obvious position is understandable since he is part of the Mexican political system. First, I feel that there is a strong effort being made to control drug traffic in Mexico by honest Mexican officials (we still have a few of them left), and yes, most of our problem is a result of the demand for drugs in the U.S. However, this does not justify the growing corruption in our country, and in the U.S. for that matter.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly two decades, leftist academic Jorge Castaneda was one of the most influential analysts of power in Mexico. Now, as foreign minister, he's putting his theories to work as he exercises power himself. "I'm a person of ideas--that's what I've been doing for the last 20 years," said the longtime columnist, prolific author and political advisor. "I write stuff and I say, 'This is what should be done, blah, blah, blah.' And all of a sudden, I have a chance to put them into practice.
WORLD
October 19, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could have far-reaching implications for future elections here, an international tribunal has ruled that Mexico's government cannot prevent Jorge Castaneda, a controversial writer and former foreign minister, from mounting an independent campaign for president. The Washington-based Inter-American Commission on Human Rights voted 6 to 1 to request that Mexico adopt "precautionary measures" that would allow Castaneda's name to appear on the ballot in next year's vote.
OPINION
August 12, 2001 | SERGIO MUNOZ
For almost 150 years, Mexico's foreign policy was essentially defensive. Nonintervention and self-determination were its twin pillars. Today, as Mexico democratizes and becomes a key player in the global economy, its approach to the world is correspondingly changing. Under President Vicente Fox and his foreign minister, Jorge Castaneda, human rights and democracy have become core values in Mexico's foreign policy.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly two decades, leftist academic Jorge Castaneda was one of the most influential analysts of power in Mexico. Now, as foreign minister, he's putting his theories to work as he exercises power himself. "I'm a person of ideas--that's what I've been doing for the last 20 years," said the longtime columnist, prolific author and political advisor. "I write stuff and I say, 'This is what should be done, blah, blah, blah.' And all of a sudden, I have a chance to put them into practice.
BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Why, Jorge Castaneda asks at the start of "Companero," did the Bolivian army wash the bullet-ridden corpse of Che Guevara and pose it, open-eyed, seemingly unmarked and serene? The image, flashed around the world in 1967, became an icon: a revolutionary Deposition from the Cross for the generational insurgencies that were breaking out in such different places as the United States, Paris, Prague and Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
The commentary by Jorge Castaneda of May 8 and your editorial of the same day lament Mexico's apparently insurmountable economic problems, which are highlighted by a 50% inflation rate, 2 million people unemployed, an ever-rising crime rate and uncontrollable illegal immigration to the United States. But, neither article nor editorial identifies the cause of the problems or suggests a remedy. Mexicans are victims of Catholic dogma, which forbids them from practicing birth control. As a consequence, their population increased from 17 million in 1930 to 91 million in 1995; it doubled in the last 28 years, and at this rate it is expected to double again in the next 40 years.
BOOKS
February 11, 1996 | Benjamin Alire Saenz, Benjamin Alire Saenz's most recent book is "Carry Me Like Water" (Hyperion)
It is something of an understatement to say that the United States has never understood Mexico. Nor have this country's policymakers ever come to terms with a country that operates within a cultural and political framework so radically different from our own. Unfortunately, the United States' relationship with Mexico has always relied on myths that were either romantic representations of a colorful people inhabiting a paradise or xenophobic suspicions of a people incapable of enlightenment.
BOOKS
February 11, 1996 | Benjamin Alire Saenz, Benjamin Alire Saenz's most recent book is "Carry Me Like Water" (Hyperion)
It is something of an understatement to say that the United States has never understood Mexico. Nor have this country's policymakers ever come to terms with a country that operates within a cultural and political framework so radically different from our own. Unfortunately, the United States' relationship with Mexico has always relied on myths that were either romantic representations of a colorful people inhabiting a paradise or xenophobic suspicions of a people incapable of enlightenment.
BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Why, Jorge Castaneda asks at the start of "Companero," did the Bolivian army wash the bullet-ridden corpse of Che Guevara and pose it, open-eyed, seemingly unmarked and serene? The image, flashed around the world in 1967, became an icon: a revolutionary Deposition from the Cross for the generational insurgencies that were breaking out in such different places as the United States, Paris, Prague and Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995
Re "Did Someone Say 'I Told You So'?" Commentary, March 7: It is not at all surprising for Jorge Castaneda to be upset about the conditions of the recent financial assistance made to Mexico by the U.S. and others. Many of my friends in Mexico feel their government gave away the store to obtain the badly needed loans. However, this is no reason for Castaneda to verbally attack and try to place the blame on the U.S. for the loan conditions, as the conditions merely reflect the severity of the situation in Mexico.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | Tina Rosenberg, Tina Rosenberg, author of "Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America," is working on a book on how Eastern Europe is dealing with its Communist past
Latin American politics has always swayed with the winds from abroad, but in the late 1980s, these winds took on hurricane force. The spread of the free-market gospel and the fall of Communism have brought to Latin America the discrediting of most Leninist groups, the widespread institution of austerity plans and the election of presidents--Alberto Fujimori in Peru, Carlos Andres Perez in Venezuela, Carlos Menem in Argentina--who ran on the left but governed from the right.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|