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Jorge Diaz Serrano

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NEWS
September 18, 1988 | From Reuters
Bush helped form an oil-drilling operation in Mexico in 1960 using local front men in an apparent attempt to circumvent Mexican law, a weekly newspaper said Saturday. The financial newspaper Barron's said Bush and associates at the Houston-based Zapata Off-Shore Co. teamed up with a prominent Mexican named Jorge Diaz Serrano to hide the 50% American involvement in Perforaciones Marinas del Golfo (Permargo) from the Mexican government. The report, written from Mexico City, also said the U.S.
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NEWS
September 18, 1988 | From Reuters
Bush helped form an oil-drilling operation in Mexico in 1960 using local front men in an apparent attempt to circumvent Mexican law, a weekly newspaper said Saturday. The financial newspaper Barron's said Bush and associates at the Houston-based Zapata Off-Shore Co. teamed up with a prominent Mexican named Jorge Diaz Serrano to hide the 50% American involvement in Perforaciones Marinas del Golfo (Permargo) from the Mexican government. The report, written from Mexico City, also said the U.S.
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NEWS
July 31, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The former director of Mexico's national oil company, a one-time presidential hopeful jailed for embezzlement under a government anti-corruption campaign, walked out of federal prison Saturday to a crush of photographers, fans and mariachi musicians singing "The King."
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The former director of Mexico's national oil company, a one-time presidential hopeful jailed for embezzlement under a government anti-corruption campaign, walked out of federal prison Saturday to a crush of photographers, fans and mariachi musicians singing "The King."
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Arturo (Blackie) Durazo seemed like a natural target for prosecution in a campaign against high-level corruption in Mexico--natural but, as it turns out, not easy. Durazo was an obscure federal policeman whose career suddenly blossomed in 1977 when a childhood friend, Jose Lopez Portillo, became president of Mexico. Lopez Portillo named Durazo--a portly man with bulldog jowls and, some say, bulldog instincts--as Mexico City's police chief.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The Chamber of Deputies is investigating charges by the oil workers union that the governor of Mexico state embezzled $49 million from the government petroleum monopoly Pemex while he ran it. Seven deputies from the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, made the accusation against Gov. Mario Ramon Beteta Thursday. PRI deputy Adolfo Barrientos, head of a local union, accused Beteta of defrauding Pemex of $49 million through a 1985 deal for two Yugoslav-built tankers.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A criminal court in Mexico has found Jorge Diaz Serrano, the former director of the giant government oil company Pemex, guilty of fraud in a $34-million kickback scheme involving the purchase of two oil tankers. The court sentenced Diaz Serrano to 10 years in prison and fined him the equivalent of $54 million. The case was seen as a measure of the seriousness of Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid's war on corruption, known as "moral renovation."
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The house was as grand as everyone expected. A giant tapestry with the official seal of Mexico dominated the entrance. Everywhere there were antiques, paintings, sculptures and carvings, especially figures of horses. The five-level, circular library is said to hold 40,000 volumes. Oriental rugs were scattered about. Dozens of old pistols and rifles hung from the walls. There were chairs covered in gold leaf, and no one could tell whether the swimming pool was Olympic-size or not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1987
Recent reports from Dan Williams, chief of The Times' Mexico City bureau, illustrate how much remains to be done to eliminate official corruption in Mexico five years after President Miguel de la Madrid launched his "moral renovation" campaign. There have been small but significant victories, to be sure. It is now reportedly possible to obtain a driver's license in Mexico without bribing low-level clerks, for example.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since he left office in 1982, former Mexican President Jose Lopez Portillo defended himself Wednesday against widespread charges that he grew rich during his term in office. For more than three years, both the Mexican and foreign press have chronicled numerous charges of bribery, kickbacks and nepotism during his six years of rule. Until now Lopez Portillo has not publicly responded to this image of his regime as one that was rife with corruption.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Arturo (Blackie) Durazo seemed like a natural target for prosecution in a campaign against high-level corruption in Mexico--natural but, as it turns out, not easy. Durazo was an obscure federal policeman whose career suddenly blossomed in 1977 when a childhood friend, Jose Lopez Portillo, became president of Mexico. Lopez Portillo named Durazo--a portly man with bulldog jowls and, some say, bulldog instincts--as Mexico City's police chief.
OPINION
March 19, 1995 | M. Delal Baer, M. Delal Baer is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and director of the Mexico Project there. She is writing a book on Mexico during the Salinas years
"There is no room in Mexico for ex-presidents," former President Jose Lopez Portillo (1976-1982) was said to have warned former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari. He should know. Lopez Portillo quietly moved to Rome after leaving office. Loyal to the unwritten rules of the Mexican political game, he endured his political lynching in silence until years later, when he published his memoirs. His hyperactive predecessor, Luis Echeverria (1970-1976), wanted to be U.N.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1985 | Associated Press
The borrowing spree launched a decade ago to modernize Latin America has come to a painful halt with many of the largest projects unfulfilled and the region $350 billion in debt. The burden of paying the money back to lenders has risen to 65 cents of every dollar earned from exports. For the past two years, virtually all new loans from banks have gone to pay interest owed to these same banks. Meanwhile, huge public-works projects started with earlier loans have failed to pay off.
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