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Jorge G Castaneda

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BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | Abraham F. Lowenthal, Lowenthal, a professor of international relations at USC and executive director of the Washington-based organization Inter-American Dialogue, is author of "Partners in Conflict: The United States and Latin America" (Johns Hopkins University Press). and
No country affects the United States as much as Mexico. No other country is more pervasively influenced by the United States, in turn. Few bilateral relationships in the world are more complex, or more difficult to manage. Millions of persons engage in an intricate web of transactions between Mexico and the United States, most of them legal, but many not. U.S. corporations and banks have invested billions of dollars in Mexico; Mexicans have stashed billions in U.S. bank accounts and real estate; and Mexican workers in the United States send $2 billion a year to relatives at home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 17, 2007
Re "Immigration's lost voices," Opinion, June 13 Jorge G. Castaneda, former foreign minister of Mexico, writes: "The collapse of the bipartisan immigration deal in the Senate last week sends a terrible message." How would Castaneda feel if government officials in other countries made similar statements in response to Mexico's efforts to control its borders? Would he and other Mexican leaders feel OK if foreign governments interfered with and tried to impose their will on Mexico? Mexican citizen Carlos Slim Helu is now the world's second wealthiest person.
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OPINION
June 17, 2007
Re "Immigration's lost voices," Opinion, June 13 Jorge G. Castaneda, former foreign minister of Mexico, writes: "The collapse of the bipartisan immigration deal in the Senate last week sends a terrible message." How would Castaneda feel if government officials in other countries made similar statements in response to Mexico's efforts to control its borders? Would he and other Mexican leaders feel OK if foreign governments interfered with and tried to impose their will on Mexico? Mexican citizen Carlos Slim Helu is now the world's second wealthiest person.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly two decades, leftist academic Jorge Castaneda was one of the most influential analysts of power in Mexico. Now, as foreign minister, he's putting his theories to work as he exercises power himself. "I'm a person of ideas--that's what I've been doing for the last 20 years," said the longtime columnist, prolific author and political advisor. "I write stuff and I say, 'This is what should be done, blah, blah, blah.' And all of a sudden, I have a chance to put them into practice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1989
In response to "Castro's Revolution at 30," by Jorge G. Castaneda, Op-Ed Page, Dec. 29: While a group of distinguished intellectuals and artists that include Federico Fellini, Yves Montand and Jack Nicholson has written an open letter to Cuba's Fidel Castro requesting a public referendum, similar to the one that recently took place in Chile, Castaneda laments a revolution that's gone out of fashion. It's simply cruel and outrageous to read that "the accounts of a Cuban gulag were greatly exaggerated."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1987
Whoever reads "The Flip Side of Democracy" by Jorge G. Castaneda (Editorial Pages, May 3) will get the impression that in order to appear completely independent from their northern neighbor the nations of Latin America must oppose any and all causes promoted by the United States. The rejection of the Cuban case by most Latin American members at the U.N. Commission of Human Rights was an offense to all decent human beings. Despite Castaneda's suggestion that the human rights violations in Cuba have been concocted by the U.S. Department of State, the abuses perpetrated on the Cuban people by the Castro regime are well documented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994
For The Times, a major American newspaper, to hail the PRI's autocratic nomination of a presidential candidate ("A Vote for Continuity," editorial, March 30) in the name of building a "modern economy" is disgusting. Under President Porfirio Diaz (1871-1880), the finances of Mexico were stabilized and the country experienced an unprecedented economic development. Foreign capital, especially, American, was invested in the exploitation of the country's mineral resources;: mining, textile and other industries were expanded; railroad, ports, telegraph lines were constructed, and foreign trade increased about 300%.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that Mexico's propaganda war may be turning violent, a prominent critic of the government has received two death threats in less than a week, according to police reports. The first threat was made by a man tentatively identified as a Mexico City police investigator. The threats against Jorge G. Castaneda, a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, have caused an uproar in Mexican political and intellectual circles.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The summer of 1980 was dry in Mexico. Crops and livestock died. Pressured to explain the disaster, Mexico's weather forecasting service chief suggested a U.S. hurricane-tracking aircraft might be the culprit. Checking on that idea, a university researcher reported the only explanation for Mexico's stolen rain was "the deliberate and effective program carried out by the United States." Newspapers across Mexico went on a three-week spree of anti-American attacks.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly two decades, leftist academic Jorge Castaneda was one of the most influential analysts of power in Mexico. Now, as foreign minister, he's putting his theories to work as he exercises power himself. "I'm a person of ideas--that's what I've been doing for the last 20 years," said the longtime columnist, prolific author and political advisor. "I write stuff and I say, 'This is what should be done, blah, blah, blah.' And all of a sudden, I have a chance to put them into practice.
BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Why, Jorge Castaneda asks at the start of "Companero," did the Bolivian army wash the bullet-ridden corpse of Che Guevara and pose it, open-eyed, seemingly unmarked and serene? The image, flashed around the world in 1967, became an icon: a revolutionary Deposition from the Cross for the generational insurgencies that were breaking out in such different places as the United States, Paris, Prague and Latin America.
BOOKS
February 11, 1996 | Benjamin Alire Saenz, Benjamin Alire Saenz's most recent book is "Carry Me Like Water" (Hyperion)
It is something of an understatement to say that the United States has never understood Mexico. Nor have this country's policymakers ever come to terms with a country that operates within a cultural and political framework so radically different from our own. Unfortunately, the United States' relationship with Mexico has always relied on myths that were either romantic representations of a colorful people inhabiting a paradise or xenophobic suspicions of a people incapable of enlightenment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994
For The Times, a major American newspaper, to hail the PRI's autocratic nomination of a presidential candidate ("A Vote for Continuity," editorial, March 30) in the name of building a "modern economy" is disgusting. Under President Porfirio Diaz (1871-1880), the finances of Mexico were stabilized and the country experienced an unprecedented economic development. Foreign capital, especially, American, was invested in the exploitation of the country's mineral resources;: mining, textile and other industries were expanded; railroad, ports, telegraph lines were constructed, and foreign trade increased about 300%.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | Tina Rosenberg, Tina Rosenberg, author of "Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America," is working on a book on how Eastern Europe is dealing with its Communist past
Latin American politics has always swayed with the winds from abroad, but in the late 1980s, these winds took on hurricane force. The spread of the free-market gospel and the fall of Communism have brought to Latin America the discrediting of most Leninist groups, the widespread institution of austerity plans and the election of presidents--Alberto Fujimori in Peru, Carlos Andres Perez in Venezuela, Carlos Menem in Argentina--who ran on the left but governed from the right.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign that Mexico's propaganda war may be turning violent, a prominent critic of the government has received two death threats in less than a week, according to police reports. The first threat was made by a man tentatively identified as a Mexico City police investigator. The threats against Jorge G. Castaneda, a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, have caused an uproar in Mexican political and intellectual circles.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The summer of 1980 was dry in Mexico. Crops and livestock died. Pressured to explain the disaster, Mexico's weather forecasting service chief suggested a U.S. hurricane-tracking aircraft might be the culprit. Checking on that idea, a university researcher reported the only explanation for Mexico's stolen rain was "the deliberate and effective program carried out by the United States." Newspapers across Mexico went on a three-week spree of anti-American attacks.
BOOKS
November 2, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Why, Jorge Castaneda asks at the start of "Companero," did the Bolivian army wash the bullet-ridden corpse of Che Guevara and pose it, open-eyed, seemingly unmarked and serene? The image, flashed around the world in 1967, became an icon: a revolutionary Deposition from the Cross for the generational insurgencies that were breaking out in such different places as the United States, Paris, Prague and Latin America.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | Tina Rosenberg, Tina Rosenberg, author of "Children of Cain: Violence and the Violent in Latin America," is working on a book on how Eastern Europe is dealing with its Communist past
Latin American politics has always swayed with the winds from abroad, but in the late 1980s, these winds took on hurricane force. The spread of the free-market gospel and the fall of Communism have brought to Latin America the discrediting of most Leninist groups, the widespread institution of austerity plans and the election of presidents--Alberto Fujimori in Peru, Carlos Andres Perez in Venezuela, Carlos Menem in Argentina--who ran on the left but governed from the right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1989
In response to "Castro's Revolution at 30," by Jorge G. Castaneda, Op-Ed Page, Dec. 29: While a group of distinguished intellectuals and artists that include Federico Fellini, Yves Montand and Jack Nicholson has written an open letter to Cuba's Fidel Castro requesting a public referendum, similar to the one that recently took place in Chile, Castaneda laments a revolution that's gone out of fashion. It's simply cruel and outrageous to read that "the accounts of a Cuban gulag were greatly exaggerated."
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | Abraham F. Lowenthal, Lowenthal, a professor of international relations at USC and executive director of the Washington-based organization Inter-American Dialogue, is author of "Partners in Conflict: The United States and Latin America" (Johns Hopkins University Press). and
No country affects the United States as much as Mexico. No other country is more pervasively influenced by the United States, in turn. Few bilateral relationships in the world are more complex, or more difficult to manage. Millions of persons engage in an intricate web of transactions between Mexico and the United States, most of them legal, but many not. U.S. corporations and banks have invested billions of dollars in Mexico; Mexicans have stashed billions in U.S. bank accounts and real estate; and Mexican workers in the United States send $2 billion a year to relatives at home.
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