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Jorge Godoy

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December 9, 1992 | JIM NEWTON and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Top Mexican government officials met with drug traffickers to plan the kidnaping and murder of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena, a key prosecution witness testified Tuesday in the trial of two men charged with the crime. The witness, Jorge Godoy, told jurors of parties at which traffickers smoked crack cocaine and mingled with high-ranking officials, and he offered detailed descriptions of four meetings in which he said the Camarena abduction was discussed.
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NEWS
December 9, 1992 | JIM NEWTON and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Top Mexican government officials met with drug traffickers to plan the kidnaping and murder of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena, a key prosecution witness testified Tuesday in the trial of two men charged with the crime. The witness, Jorge Godoy, told jurors of parties at which traffickers smoked crack cocaine and mingled with high-ranking officials, and he offered detailed descriptions of four meetings in which he said the Camarena abduction was discussed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prosecution witness in the trial of two men charged in connection with the 1985 murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena admitted Monday that he had previously lied under oath but angrily denied that he is cooperating with the government in this case because of its payments to him. "I abandoned more than half a million dollars in property in Mexico so that I could get $130,000?" the witness, Lawrence Victor Harrison, asked sarcastically of a defense lawyer. "I don't see the profit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has refused to set aside the conviction of a Mexican businessman serving a life term for helping plan the 1985 kidnap and murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena in Guadalajara. U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie said in an opinion made public Wednesday that businessman Ruben Zuno Arce had failed to present sufficient evidence to warrant overturning the jury verdict.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | FREDRIC N. TULSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve years after a U.S. drug agent was kidnapped, tortured and murdered in Mexico, evidence has emerged that federal prosecutors relied on perjured testimony and false information, casting a cloud over the convictions of three men now serving life sentences. The evidence suggests that the U.S. government, in its zeal to solve the heinous killing of Enrique Camarena, induced corrupt former Mexican police to implicate top officials there in a conspiracy to plan his kidnapping.
OPINION
December 27, 1992 | JORGE CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda, a graduate professor of political science at the National University of Mexico, is a visiting professor at Princeton University this year. DEA's hand in the Camarena case was shameful, but the Salinas government confirmed America's fears
As Judge Roy Bean might have said, it was a strange week for truth and justice in Los Angeles. Whatever else may be said about the trial (and tribulations) of Humberto Alvarez Machain and Ruben Zuno Arce, it has certainly given Mexicans much to talk about. But it has not done much for the cause of due process and stable bilateral relations.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for Mexican businessman Ruben Zuno Arce, who is accused of helping plan the 1985 kidnaping of an American drug agent, requested a mistrial Wednesday because, they said, government documents that surfaced on the final day of the proceeding contained material that might have helped their case. The motion was denied by U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie, but he added that the new information was "very disturbing."
WORLD
March 6, 2004 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
For more than 20 years, the imposing buildings on this capital's Liberator Avenue have stood as a conspicuous monument to denial. As many as 5,000 people were killed inside the notorious Navy Mechanics School, used as a concentration camp by Argentina's military junta. The letters above the columned facade still announce Escuela Mecanica de la Armada -- words that to many Argentines carry sickening connotations.
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