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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Conjoined twins from Guatemala who were separated last year were undergoing tests Friday at the UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital after both experienced health problems. Maria Teresa and Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez arrived Thursday from Guatemala. The 22-month-olds will be examined over the next few days, according to a statement from the hospital. "Many of us ... developed a real attachment to the girls over the seven months they were here," Dr.
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MAGAZINE
January 11, 2004 | Miles Beller, Miles Beller last wrote for the magazine about Los Angeles police commissioner and real estate developer Rick Caruso. "True to Life," Beller's novel about translation set in 1940s Italy, is due next year from CM Publishing.
''You wouldn't want me to be late for the man who saved my life, would you?" My 13-year-old son, Eli, puckishly smiled, urging my wife, Laurette, and me into the car. Six years ago on a clear night in January, a compact fellow with confident hands had sliced out a tumor and a cyst--together the size of a tennis ball--from Eli's brain. Now, on a recent Saturday evening, we were heading for dinner with Jorge Antonio Lazareff, the UCLA pediatric neurosurgeon who had operated on Eli.
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HEALTH
August 12, 2002 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story of the high-risk surgery to separate 1-year-old conjoined twins from Guatemala captured the hearts of many around the world last week. As of Friday, Maria Teresa and Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez, who shared a skull and several important blood vessels, were faring well. Doctors say their road to full recovery will be a long one. During the 22-hour surgery at Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA, a team of reconstructive and neurosurgeons cut through their skull, redirected veins and covered their exposed brains with skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Conjoined twins from Guatemala who were separated last year were undergoing tests Friday at the UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital after both experienced health problems. Maria Teresa and Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez arrived Thursday from Guatemala. The 22-month-olds will be examined over the next few days, according to a statement from the hospital. "Many of us ... developed a real attachment to the girls over the seven months they were here," Dr.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 2004 | Miles Beller, Miles Beller last wrote for the magazine about Los Angeles police commissioner and real estate developer Rick Caruso. "True to Life," Beller's novel about translation set in 1940s Italy, is due next year from CM Publishing.
''You wouldn't want me to be late for the man who saved my life, would you?" My 13-year-old son, Eli, puckishly smiled, urging my wife, Laurette, and me into the car. Six years ago on a clear night in January, a compact fellow with confident hands had sliced out a tumor and a cyst--together the size of a tennis ball--from Eli's brain. Now, on a recent Saturday evening, we were heading for dinner with Jorge Antonio Lazareff, the UCLA pediatric neurosurgeon who had operated on Eli.
WORLD
February 8, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An 8-week-old girl died seven hours after surgery to remove her partially formed twin, her parents and doctors said. Doctors who removed the undeveloped second head from Rebeca Martinez had warned that she would be at great risk of infection or hemorrhaging. UCLA's Dr. Jorge Lazareff said the Dominican infant lost a lot of blood and had a heart attack.
WORLD
February 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Surgeons led by UCLA's Jorge Lazareff successfully removed a partially formed twin from a Dominican baby in a complex operation that doctors believed was the first of its kind. The medical team said the nearly 11-hour operation on 7-week-old Rebeca Martinez went smoothly. She will remain in the hospital for at least 10 days. "We are super-happy. This is what we hoped for, and it happened," said her father, Franklin Martinez.
WORLD
February 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A team of surgeons led by UCLA's Dr. Jorge Lazareff planned to operate today on a Dominican infant to remove a partially formed conjoined twin, a risky surgery believed to be the first of its kind. Rebeca Martinez was born Dec. 17 with only the undeveloped head of her twin attached to the crown of her head, a condition known as craniopagus parasiticus. She is only the eighth documented case and most are stillborn, doctors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The formerly conjoined twins from Guatemala are both improving, and one of them, Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez, has been moved from intensive care to a regular room, doctors at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital said Friday. The 14-month-old also was upgraded to good condition, and while her sister, Maria Teresa, remains in intensive care, her condition has been upgraded to fair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2003 | Monte Morin, Times Staff Writer
A team of UCLA physicians flew to Guatemala on Monday night to help treat one of two formerly conjoined twins who fell critically ill with an infection this month, medical officials said. In a prepared statement released Monday, officials at UCLA's Mattel Children's Hospital said 21-month-old Maria Teresa Quiej Alvarez had "improved significantly" since she was hospitalized two weeks ago in Guatemala City with E. coli meningitis.
HEALTH
August 12, 2002 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The story of the high-risk surgery to separate 1-year-old conjoined twins from Guatemala captured the hearts of many around the world last week. As of Friday, Maria Teresa and Maria de Jesus Quiej Alvarez, who shared a skull and several important blood vessels, were faring well. Doctors say their road to full recovery will be a long one. During the 22-hour surgery at Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA, a team of reconstructive and neurosurgeons cut through their skull, redirected veins and covered their exposed brains with skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
An operation Friday on a formerly conjoined twin from Guatemala went well, according to her neurosurgeon, but it will take time to determine its effectiveness. The surgery replaced a shunt in the 22-month-old's head to drain fluid after the previous one became infected. "The surgery went as planned," said Dr. Jorge Lazareff, lead neurosurgeon for the twins. "However, it will be at least a week before we will see the results of the surgery and its impact on Maria Teresa's medical condition."
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