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Jorge Mas Canosa

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1997
Walter Russell Mead's piece on Jorge Mas Canosa (Opinion, Nov. 30) is an insult to this departed patriot and his family. Mas Canosa was a great leader who struggled tirelessly for many years to liberate Cuba from Fidel Castro. He believed in democracy and wanted Cuba to enjoy its benefits. He did tremendous humanitarian work through the Cuban American National Foundation. Being the Cuban American with the highest profile in the fight against communism made him a constant target of liberals in this country, as well as Castro.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. Web site: http://www.robertscheer.com
When is it all right to blow up restaurants and kill tourists? Anytime, according to Luis Posada Carriles, who masterminded last year's attacks on Cuba's booming tourist industry, terrorizing disco dancers and diners alike. In a startling revelation this week, the 70-year-old Posada revealed that key Cuban American lobbyists in this country financed his activities, in apparent violation of U.S. law, while the FBI and CIA looked the other way. Once again, history won't keep its mouth shut.
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NEWS
November 24, 1997 | From Reuters
Cuban exile leader Jorge Mas Canosa, who died Sunday, lived the American immigrant's dream but never saw his dearest wish realized: the overthrow of his nemesis, Cuban President Fidel Castro. The face and voice of Miami's hard-line Cuban exile community for nearly 20 years, Mas amassed a huge fortune and vast political influence in Washington even as Communist Havana reviled him as little more than a fascist gangster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1997
Walter Russell Mead's piece on Jorge Mas Canosa (Opinion, Nov. 30) is an insult to this departed patriot and his family. Mas Canosa was a great leader who struggled tirelessly for many years to liberate Cuba from Fidel Castro. He believed in democracy and wanted Cuba to enjoy its benefits. He did tremendous humanitarian work through the Cuban American National Foundation. Being the Cuban American with the highest profile in the fight against communism made him a constant target of liberals in this country, as well as Castro.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jorge Mas Canosa, a wealthy Cuban American businessman who rose from exile to wield enormous influence in shaping this nation's hard-line policy toward Cuba, died Sunday of lung cancer. He was 58. Mas Canosa fled Cuba less than two years after Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. From his home in Miami, he became the Cuban president's most prominent and feisty foe.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Mas Canosa was gesticulating wildly, working his audience into a fever, when a solitary figure slowly emerged from the crowd and made his way toward the podium. The bent old man finally teetered to a stop a few feet from Mas Canosa and pulled out a camera. Without missing a beat, Mas Canosa turned and made brief eye contact at the instant the flash went off, sending the photographer back to his seat with a personal photo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. Web site: http://www.robertscheer.com
When is it all right to blow up restaurants and kill tourists? Anytime, according to Luis Posada Carriles, who masterminded last year's attacks on Cuba's booming tourist industry, terrorizing disco dancers and diners alike. In a startling revelation this week, the 70-year-old Posada revealed that key Cuban American lobbyists in this country financed his activities, in apparent violation of U.S. law, while the FBI and CIA looked the other way. Once again, history won't keep its mouth shut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1997 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist
Years ago I came to the sad conclusion that this country's fundamentally flawed policy toward Communist Cuba would not change until the Cuban strongman whose rigid politics helped create it was dead. Unfortunately, the stubborn Cuban political leader I had in mind was Fidel Castro--not Jorge Mas Canosa, the controversial Miami businessman who was Castro's archnemesis. The founder and chairman of the Cuban American National Foundation, Mas Canosa died last weekend of lung cancer.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992 | PAT JORDAN, Pat Jordan is a Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., writer.
JORGE MAS CANOSA, 52, IS A MIAMI BEEKEEPER AND former milkman who made his fortune planting telephone cable and has a very busy-looking passport. It is stamped with the names of far-flung ports-of-call: Brazil. Nicaragua. Czechoslovakia. Argentina. El Salvador. Panama. Hungary. Honduras. Chile. Costa Rica. Guatemala. Portugal. Angola. The Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Mas Canosa, a Cuban immigrant who made a fortune selling tractors and stringing telephone cables in Florida, is peddling something new these days: opportunities in a "free Cuba" after President Fidel Castro is gone. For $10,000 a year, he tells business people, you can become a "director" of his Cuban American National Foundation, which has drafted a new constitution for the island and a 430-page blueprint for converting its economy from socialism to consumerism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1997 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist
Years ago I came to the sad conclusion that this country's fundamentally flawed policy toward Communist Cuba would not change until the Cuban strongman whose rigid politics helped create it was dead. Unfortunately, the stubborn Cuban political leader I had in mind was Fidel Castro--not Jorge Mas Canosa, the controversial Miami businessman who was Castro's archnemesis. The founder and chairman of the Cuban American National Foundation, Mas Canosa died last weekend of lung cancer.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | From Reuters
Cuban exile leader Jorge Mas Canosa, who died Sunday, lived the American immigrant's dream but never saw his dearest wish realized: the overthrow of his nemesis, Cuban President Fidel Castro. The face and voice of Miami's hard-line Cuban exile community for nearly 20 years, Mas amassed a huge fortune and vast political influence in Washington even as Communist Havana reviled him as little more than a fascist gangster.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jorge Mas Canosa, a wealthy Cuban American businessman who rose from exile to wield enormous influence in shaping this nation's hard-line policy toward Cuba, died Sunday of lung cancer. He was 58. Mas Canosa fled Cuba less than two years after Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. From his home in Miami, he became the Cuban president's most prominent and feisty foe.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Mas Canosa was gesticulating wildly, working his audience into a fever, when a solitary figure slowly emerged from the crowd and made his way toward the podium. The bent old man finally teetered to a stop a few feet from Mas Canosa and pulled out a camera. Without missing a beat, Mas Canosa turned and made brief eye contact at the instant the flash went off, sending the photographer back to his seat with a personal photo.
MAGAZINE
May 3, 1992 | PAT JORDAN, Pat Jordan is a Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., writer.
JORGE MAS CANOSA, 52, IS A MIAMI BEEKEEPER AND former milkman who made his fortune planting telephone cable and has a very busy-looking passport. It is stamped with the names of far-flung ports-of-call: Brazil. Nicaragua. Czechoslovakia. Argentina. El Salvador. Panama. Hungary. Honduras. Chile. Costa Rica. Guatemala. Portugal. Angola. The Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Mas Canosa, a Cuban immigrant who made a fortune selling tractors and stringing telephone cables in Florida, is peddling something new these days: opportunities in a "free Cuba" after President Fidel Castro is gone. For $10,000 a year, he tells business people, you can become a "director" of his Cuban American National Foundation, which has drafted a new constitution for the island and a 430-page blueprint for converting its economy from socialism to consumerism.
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1992
Who has given Jorge Mas Canosa and the Cuban-American National Foundation the right to decide the fate of Cuba after Castro? We who left Cuba because of our dislike of the present government have no right to dictate what the Cuban people should do once the present regime is out of the picture. Cubans living in Cuba are the ones who should decide how they want to be governed. SANDRA MARTIN ARNOLD Van Nuys
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