Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJorge Rafael Videla
IN THE NEWS

Jorge Rafael Videla

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BUENOS AIRES - Former Argentine dictator Jorge Rafael Videla, who presided over that country's so-called dirty war in which up to 30,000 dissidents were murdered or disappeared, died Friday while serving a 50-year prison sentence. He was 87. He died of natural causes at Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires state, according to official announcements. Videla led a rebel military group that in 1976 overthrew president Isabel Peron and then installed a reign of terror lasting seven years in which thousands of leftist politicians and activists were taken from their homes and workplaces, often in the dead of night, tortured and killed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2013 | By Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BUENOS AIRES - Former Argentine dictator Jorge Rafael Videla, who presided over that country's so-called dirty war in which up to 30,000 dissidents were murdered or disappeared, died Friday while serving a 50-year prison sentence. He was 87. He died of natural causes at Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires state, according to official announcements. Videla led a rebel military group that in 1976 overthrew president Isabel Peron and then installed a reign of terror lasting seven years in which thousands of leftist politicians and activists were taken from their homes and workplaces, often in the dead of night, tortured and killed.
Advertisement
WORLD
March 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Andres D'Alessandro
Los Angeles Times BUENOS AIRES - Mercedes Alvarez is among the many here who will never believe that Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Argentine chosen to be pope, did anything unsavory during the dark days of this country's "dirty war. " She is aware of the allegations against him. And she has written them off as political gamesmanship. "What's happening," the homemaker said the day before Pope Francis was inaugurated in Rome last week, "is that our president had been fighting with him, and she is trying to hurt his reputation.
WORLD
March 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Andres D'Alessandro
Los Angeles Times BUENOS AIRES - Mercedes Alvarez is among the many here who will never believe that Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Argentine chosen to be pope, did anything unsavory during the dark days of this country's "dirty war. " She is aware of the allegations against him. And she has written them off as political gamesmanship. "What's happening," the homemaker said the day before Pope Francis was inaugurated in Rome last week, "is that our president had been fighting with him, and she is trying to hurt his reputation.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | Reuters
The Spanish judge behind the arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet issued international arrest warrants Tuesday for Argentina's former military rulers, charging them with "dirty war" atrocities. Judge Baltasar Garzon accused 98 military and police officers, including nearly a dozen junta members, of genocide, torture and terrorism during Argentina's 1976-83 dictatorship.
WORLD
July 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
A federal judge ordered the detention Thursday of 45 former officers accused by a Spanish prosecutor of human rights abuses during Argentina's 1976-83 dictatorship. Judge Rodolfo Canicoba Corral said the detentions are an initial move toward extradition. Local reports said he acted on a request by Spanish Judge Baltasar Garzon, who once indicted former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet and has filed similar charges against dozens of former members of the Argentine military.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | From Reuters
A retired Argentine army general was detained Thursday as part of a widening investigation into the theft of babies from women held in secret torture chambers during this country's dictatorship. Former Gen. Juan Bautista Sasiain became the 11th officer to be detained in the investigation into one of the most horrific chapters of Argentina's 1976-83 military rule. Sasiain headed an army brigade in the "dirty war" against leftist guerrillas and suspected sympathizers.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jorge Rafael Videla, Argentina's former dictator, was arrested Tuesday as part of an investigation into one of the most brutal crimes of this nation's military regime in the 1970s and '80s: the systematic kidnapping of children. Federal police arrested Videla, 72, at his suburban apartment shortly after 6 p.m. on orders of a judge investigating a case brought by relatives of "disappeared" children, authorities said. Few details were available.
NEWS
April 23, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Amid tensions that spilled from a packed courtroom into the streets, three former Argentine military presidents and six members of juntas they commanded went on public trial here Monday on charges of massive human rights violations. A dramatic accusation by President Raul Alfonsin on the eve of the trial that right-wing politicians have conspired to destabilize his government fueled disquiet and national controversy.
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man who once terrorized Argentina has become the newest inmate in the VIP cellblock of a prison that opened during his dictatorship and bears a plaque with his name on it. At 72, former Gen. Jorge Rafael Videla looks gaunt and haunted, a solitary shadow of a tyrant whose jailers in Caseros Prison still address him as "my general."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2009 | Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul
Former Argentine President Raul Alfonsin, who was given credit for restoring democracy to his country after years of coups, dictators and "dirty war," died of lung cancer Tuesday at his home in Buenos Aires. He was 82. A human rights attorney before entering politics, Alfonsin took a courageous stand by criticizing the junta that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. In the so-called dirty war against dissidents, military officers ordered the torture and murder of thousands.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2006 | Sam Adams, Special to The Times
The opening minutes of "Cautiva" (Captive), set in Buenos Aires in 1994, couldn't be more unremarkable. Cristina Quadri (Barbara Lombardo), the daughter of a retired police officer, celebrates her 15th birthday, visits the doctor and attends school, where a classmate is dismissed for questioning the teacher.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|