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Jorge Serrano

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NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The eight-member Supreme Electoral Tribunal unanimously rejected as unconstitutional President Jorge Serrano's request to call elections for a new Congress to replace the 116-member body he dissolved when he declared a state of emergency Tuesday. Tribunal President Arturo Herbruger said the tribunal cannot legally schedule such an election because of Serrano's suspension of 46 articles of the constitution.
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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jorge Serrano was forced from office Tuesday under intense pressure from military commanders and civilian business leaders, one week after he suspended democratic rule and dissolved government institutions. Ending an explosive political crisis that had isolated Guatemala and spawned a furor here and abroad, the army ousted Serrano and said it was turning the government over to civilian leaders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991
In response to your editorial "Don't Hold Your Breath: New Guatemalan government may not be the answer to decades of repression" (Jan. 21): Since the military discovered that the easy way to keep Guatemala under its control is to permit a civilian to be the president of the country--as a facade, naturally--the choice for voters is not a democratic decision, because the authorized candidates are from right-wing parties only, accepted for their...
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Roman Catholic Church on Monday joined a growing clamor aimed at forcing President Jorge Serrano to resign so that constitutional rule can be restored in Guatemala. Archbishop Prospero Penados del Barrio, Catholic primate for Guatemala, said that Serrano must resign. "There is no government, only anti-government," he declared.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Roman Catholic Church on Monday joined a growing clamor aimed at forcing President Jorge Serrano to resign so that constitutional rule can be restored in Guatemala. Archbishop Prospero Penados del Barrio, Catholic primate for Guatemala, said that Serrano must resign. "There is no government, only anti-government," he declared.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day last month, Guatemalan President Jorge Serrano flew to the Pacific coast port of San Jose Escuintla to have lunch with the commander of that city's naval base and the captain of a visiting American warship. By all accounts, Serrano was relaxed and jovial, the center of attention. Two hours after his helicopter had returned him to the capital, Serrano ordered the arrest of the amiable base commander, Navy Capt. Anibal Giron Arriola, and six of his men, for the Aug.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tightening his grip on Guatemala, President Jorge Serrano on Wednesday shut down local newspapers and, despite mounting opposition, refused to back down from his decision to suspend the constitution and dissolve Congress.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Jorge Serrano was forced from office Tuesday under intense pressure from military commanders and civilian business leaders, one week after he suspended democratic rule and dissolved government institutions. Ending an explosive political crisis that had isolated Guatemala and spawned a furor here and abroad, the army ousted Serrano and said it was turning the government over to civilian leaders.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It never seems to end. Day after day, year after year, Guatemala is awash in murder, torture, kidnaping and fear, whether the government is in the hands of power-grabbing generals or elected civilians. The statistics are appalling. As of the end of August, at least 548 people had been killed this year in political violence and 114 others had been kidnaped. Another 124 people had been attacked, tortured or threatened for political reasons.
NEWS
December 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guatemalan opposition groups cheered the U.S. State Department's decision to freeze military aid to the Central American government, but President Vinicio Cerezo Arevalo called the move "drastic." The opposition attributed the decision to the government's slow response to human rights abuses and called it a "warning to the new government," scheduled to be chosen in a runoff election Jan. 6 between conservative opposition party candidates Jorge Carpio and Jorge Serrano.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The eight-member Supreme Electoral Tribunal unanimously rejected as unconstitutional President Jorge Serrano's request to call elections for a new Congress to replace the 116-member body he dissolved when he declared a state of emergency Tuesday. Tribunal President Arturo Herbruger said the tribunal cannot legally schedule such an election because of Serrano's suspension of 46 articles of the constitution.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tightening his grip on Guatemala, President Jorge Serrano on Wednesday shut down local newspapers and, despite mounting opposition, refused to back down from his decision to suspend the constitution and dissolve Congress.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day last month, Guatemalan President Jorge Serrano flew to the Pacific coast port of San Jose Escuintla to have lunch with the commander of that city's naval base and the captain of a visiting American warship. By all accounts, Serrano was relaxed and jovial, the center of attention. Two hours after his helicopter had returned him to the capital, Serrano ordered the arrest of the amiable base commander, Navy Capt. Anibal Giron Arriola, and six of his men, for the Aug.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It never seems to end. Day after day, year after year, Guatemala is awash in murder, torture, kidnaping and fear, whether the government is in the hands of power-grabbing generals or elected civilians. The statistics are appalling. As of the end of August, at least 548 people had been killed this year in political violence and 114 others had been kidnaped. Another 124 people had been attacked, tortured or threatened for political reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1991
In response to your editorial "Don't Hold Your Breath: New Guatemalan government may not be the answer to decades of repression" (Jan. 21): Since the military discovered that the easy way to keep Guatemala under its control is to permit a civilian to be the president of the country--as a facade, naturally--the choice for voters is not a democratic decision, because the authorized candidates are from right-wing parties only, accepted for their...
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A conservative businessman and evangelist who promises clean and frugal government and an end to rampant crime claimed victory over a newspaper publisher in a presidential runoff. Incomplete results showed Jorge Serrano Elias with a huge lead over publisher Jorge Carpio Nicole in a race that inspired little excitement among voters. In the capital, preliminary returns three hours after the polls closed showed Serrano leading by 232,036 to 91,548 votes with 98% of the ballots counted.
NEWS
February 23, 1993
Guatemalan government and rebel leaders are scheduled to resume peace talks today in Mexico's capital after a six-month stalemate. The discussions are aimed at ending the 33-year-old civil war that has killed about 120,000 people in Central America's largest country. Previous talks, initiated when President Jorge Serrano took office in 1991, broke down over human rights enforcement. Currently, the sides are divided over a rebel proposal to negotiate conditions for a cease-fire.
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