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Joris Ivens

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November 27, 1988 | MARY BLUME
A 13-film retrospective of Dutch documentary director Joris Ivens, in celebration of his 90th birthday, will be a part of the 66-film Anthropos 88 Festival sponsored by American Film Institute and the Discovery Channel. Ivens , accompanied by his wife, film maker Marceline Loridan, will be on his first visit to Los Angeles in decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The central image of the luminous, mesmerizing "A Tale of the Wind" (at the Nuart) is that of an elderly man sitting on a chair atop a sand dune in China's Gobi Desert. He is Joris Ivens, renowned 90-year-old Dutch-born documentarian, who is waiting for a wind to come so that he may tame it. This he cannot really do and knows it, but says, "Filming the impossible is what's best in life."
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NEWS
June 30, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Joris Ivens, noted documentary film maker whose self-described "dramatizations of daily life" vividly reflected a world in turmoil for more than 70 years, has died in Paris. He was 91, according to his wife, film maker Marceline Loridan Ivens, who often served as his co-director. Ivens, a founder of the Dutch film industry who made his first film, "Wigwam," a wistful look at cowboys and Indians, when he was only 13, died of a heart attack provoked by kidney failure at a Paris hospital Wednesday night.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Joris Ivens, noted documentary film maker whose self-described "dramatizations of daily life" vividly reflected a world in turmoil for more than 70 years, has died in Paris. He was 91, according to his wife, film maker Marceline Loridan Ivens, who often served as his co-director. Ivens, a founder of the Dutch film industry who made his first film, "Wigwam," a wistful look at cowboys and Indians, when he was only 13, died of a heart attack provoked by kidney failure at a Paris hospital Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paris-based film maker Joris Ivens has canceled his trip to Los Angeles for the Anthropos '88 Film Festival because of poor health. Because Ivens has requested that his new film, "Une Histoire du Vent (A Tale of the Wind)," not be screened on the opening night of the festival (the screening was to have been the film's American premiere), Anthropos organizers said Tuesday that the film will be replaced by the United States premiere of "Driving Me Crazy," by director Nick Broomfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The central image of the luminous, mesmerizing "A Tale of the Wind" (at the Nuart) is that of an elderly man sitting on a chair atop a sand dune in China's Gobi Desert. He is Joris Ivens, renowned 90-year-old Dutch-born documentarian, who is waiting for a wind to come so that he may tame it. This he cannot really do and knows it, but says, "Filming the impossible is what's best in life."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The rhythms of daily life captivate Danish film-maker Jorgen Leth, who brings acute, understated powers of observation to his just-completed works, "Moments of Play" and "Notebooks From China," which will screen Tuesday only at 7:30 p.m. at the Monica 4-Plex with Leth present. In the first film, Leth extends the notion of play to include all kinds of pleasurable activities--sports, dance, games--that he believes stimulate a "richness of thought" in its participants.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Think of PBS' ambitious new series, "States of Mind," as a sprawling collage encompassing contemporary U.S. cities and towns--places that become stages on which the American Dream careens head-on into the American Reality. Do not think of "States of Mind" as another production of slick info-documents or journalistic investigations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer and
The American Cinematheque and UCLA Film Archives' introductory week of "50 Years of Film From the Museum of Modern Art" tonight at 8 will present at the Doolittle (formerly Huntington Hartford) two of the 12 one-hour documentaries Joris Ivens made in China in 1972-73 as the Cultural Revolution was coming to its conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Anthropos, a certainly ambitious weeklong documentary festival presenting 100 films on a wide cross-section of subjects, will open tonight with a jolt in its scheduling. In celebration of the 90th birthday year of Joris Ivens, the noted Dutch-born documentary maker, his newest work, "A Tale of the Wind," was to open the proceedings with Ivens in attendance. Now word has come that Ivens cannot travel, "for reasons of health," and he does not want his newest film played without him.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Paris-based film maker Joris Ivens has canceled his trip to Los Angeles for the Anthropos '88 Film Festival because of poor health. Because Ivens has requested that his new film, "Une Histoire du Vent (A Tale of the Wind)," not be screened on the opening night of the festival (the screening was to have been the film's American premiere), Anthropos organizers said Tuesday that the film will be replaced by the United States premiere of "Driving Me Crazy," by director Nick Broomfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1988 | MARY BLUME
A 13-film retrospective of Dutch documentary director Joris Ivens, in celebration of his 90th birthday, will be a part of the 66-film Anthropos 88 Festival sponsored by American Film Institute and the Discovery Channel. Ivens , accompanied by his wife, film maker Marceline Loridan, will be on his first visit to Los Angeles in decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The rhythms of daily life captivate Danish film-maker Jorgen Leth, who brings acute, understated powers of observation to his just-completed works, "Moments of Play" and "Notebooks From China," which will screen Tuesday only at 7:30 p.m. at the Monica 4-Plex with Leth present. In the first film, Leth extends the notion of play to include all kinds of pleasurable activities--sports, dance, games--that he believes stimulate a "richness of thought" in its participants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
HBO's two-for-one biopic "Hemingway & Gellhorn," which would more appropriately reverse the order of those names, dramatizes the stormy coming together and falling apart of the famous novelist and his third wife, war correspondent Martha Gellhorn. The film, which premieres Monday, is a big-name affair, with Clive Owen and Nicole Kidman in the leads and Philip Kaufman directing a screenplay by Barbara Turner ("Pollock") and Jerry Stahl ("Bad Boys II"). But - though it is clearly based on research, with dialogue that scavenges the principals' own writing - it is never quite believable, either as history or drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Nothing Sacred" (1937) is one of the classic American film comedies, the one in which Fredric March and Carole Lombard trade punches so famously. If it's news to you that it was shot in gorgeous three-strip Technicolor, that's not surprising: Not since its original release has it been shown the way it was intended.
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