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Jorn Utzon

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April 7, 2003 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
Jorn Utzon, the Danish-born Modernist best known for his design of the much-celebrated Sydney Opera House, has won the 2003 Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor. Over a 40-plus year career, Utzon created a range of significant works whose bold abstract aesthetic was often tempered by a subtle understanding of more ancient precedents. The exquisite, undulating concrete roof of the Bagsvaerd Church near Copenhagen, for example, was inspired by Chinese pagodas.
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November 7, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
The last time Danish architect Jorn Utzon set eyes on his most famous creation, the Sydney Opera House, it was 1966, and workers were affixing the last ceramic tiles to its giant white sails. Utzon, who conceived the building's striking design, was forced out of the project by officials who wanted Australian architects to finish the job. The new architects discarded his design for the interior, ripping out work that had already begun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
The last time Danish architect Jorn Utzon set eyes on his most famous creation, the Sydney Opera House, it was 1966, and workers were affixing the last ceramic tiles to its giant white sails. Utzon, who conceived the building's striking design, was forced out of the project by officials who wanted Australian architects to finish the job. The new architects discarded his design for the interior, ripping out work that had already begun.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2003 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
Jorn Utzon, the Danish-born Modernist best known for his design of the much-celebrated Sydney Opera House, has won the 2003 Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor. Over a 40-plus year career, Utzon created a range of significant works whose bold abstract aesthetic was often tempered by a subtle understanding of more ancient precedents. The exquisite, undulating concrete roof of the Bagsvaerd Church near Copenhagen, for example, was inspired by Chinese pagodas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1994
Re "Great Cities, Great Public Works," Commentary, Aug. 30: Richard Weinstein's column regarding the role of great architecture in defining great cities eloquently expressed the need for public support for monumental structures such as the proposed Disney Hall. Responsible citizens should gather behind this effort. One caveat, however. Not only was the cited example, Jorn Utzon's Sydney Opera House, over cost, its final price tag was almost 15 times the 1959 original projection of $5.6 million dollars (U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Hawthorne is a Times staff writer.
Jorn Utzon, the Danish architect whose eye-catching, nautically inspired design for the Sydney Opera House overcame a series of controversies surrounding its budget and acoustics to become one of the most recognizable landmarks of the 20th century, helping to usher in the current era of buildings beloved for their daring and photogenic forms, has died. He was 90.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1992 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is an urban designer and writer whose books include "L.A. Lost & Found" (Crown Books) and "L.A. Follies" (Cityscape).
Ground was broken recently for the Walt Disney Concert Hall, which--based on a heralded design process and resulting fanciful plans--is being acclaimed as a bold attempt to create an idiosyncratic architectural icon. In this respect, the concept is not unlike the spirit that spurred the construction of the Sydney Opera House, which opened 20 years ago to mark the emergence of that Australian city.
TRAVEL
November 21, 1993 | CATHERINE FOSTER, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
The Sydney Opera House. That soaring, white-winged palace of the arts, which has been likened to everything from nun's caps to sails to sections of an orange, is 20 years old. The gleaming shells, jutting out of sparkling-blue Sydney Harbour, are recognized around the world. More than 36 million people have visited since its opening.
TRAVEL
August 25, 2002 | DALE M. BROWN
Unlike some of our friends, we are lukewarm shoppers, particularly when it comes to household furnishings. We don't like the overstuffed items we see in the popular stores around the Washington, D.C., area, where we live. But whenever we are in design-conscious Denmark, where furniture is exquisitely made and unpretentious, we confront temptation at every turn. Inevitably we end up coveting far more than we can buy.
REAL ESTATE
July 17, 1988 | Sam Hall Kaplan
On this fatal shore to discern design trends down under, review the new Parliament building and attend a touted architecture conference, I, of course, wandered off, convinced that the only way to experience antipodean architecture was serendipitously. To be sure, I did take guided tours of celebrated new projects, in particular the Parliament building, which was favorably reviewed here July 3.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
When an architect enters a design competition, he enters a realm that mixes risk and opportunity. The competition may be open to anyone who wishes to enter, attracting hundreds of jostling hopefuls. Or it may be by invitation only, limited to a select few. Either way, the designer tests his mettle against his peers in naked contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2005 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
Thom Mayne, the Santa Monica architect known for hard-edged, aggressively unconventional designs, today will be named the winner of the 2005 Pritzker Prize, the field's most prestigious honor. Mayne, whose most prominent completed projects include the new Caltrans District 7 Headquarters in downtown Los Angeles and Diamond Ranch High School in Pomona, is the first American architect to win the prize since Robert Venturi in 1991 and the first from Southern California since Frank O. Gehry in 1989.
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