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Jose Alfredo Jimenez

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ask UCLA ethnomusicology professor Steve Loza, "Que pasa?," the initial answer is simple: The late Jose Alfredo Jimenez is being pimped. Jimenez is the most famous and beloved singer-songwriter Mexico has ever known--a man equal parts genius and romantic whose tear 'n' tequila-stained lyrics were drenched in a tragic reality. He spent his short life scribbling hundreds of brilliant ranchera and mariachi standards onto soggy bar napkins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001
I'd like to thank Agustin Gurza for his insightful and accurate description of mariachi music today and its increasing and unfortunate movement toward embracing pop music--especially American Top 40 ("Mariachi on the Downbeat," June 21). The awful truth is that mariachi music, which once represented a culture and people to the whole world, has begun to lose its art and soul in an effort to make it more palatable to the masses who have come to expect and prefer the druglike fast high from predigested semi-art over the nourishment that can only come from true heartfelt creativity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1999
Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez states that Jose Alfredo Jimenez "is the most famous and beloved singer-songwriter Mexico has ever known" ("Mining the Mariachi King," Feb. 19). Really? Valdes-Rodriguez seems to have forgotten that Jimenez represents only one genre of Mexican music. As a daughter of Mexican parents, my earliest memories are not of ranchera / folkloric music. I was raised on the music and voice of Agustin Lara, who was around decades before Jimenez and is revered by Mexicans on both sides of the border.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1999
Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez states that Jose Alfredo Jimenez "is the most famous and beloved singer-songwriter Mexico has ever known" ("Mining the Mariachi King," Feb. 19). Really? Valdes-Rodriguez seems to have forgotten that Jimenez represents only one genre of Mexican music. As a daughter of Mexican parents, my earliest memories are not of ranchera / folkloric music. I was raised on the music and voice of Agustin Lara, who was around decades before Jimenez and is revered by Mexicans on both sides of the border.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001
I'd like to thank Agustin Gurza for his insightful and accurate description of mariachi music today and its increasing and unfortunate movement toward embracing pop music--especially American Top 40 ("Mariachi on the Downbeat," June 21). The awful truth is that mariachi music, which once represented a culture and people to the whole world, has begun to lose its art and soul in an effort to make it more palatable to the masses who have come to expect and prefer the druglike fast high from predigested semi-art over the nourishment that can only come from true heartfelt creativity.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Authorities identified a 19-year-old man stabbed to death Saturday night as Jose Alfredo Jimenez. Police are searching for Mario Luganas Flores, 27, for questioning. The attack occurred at 9:30 p.m. Saturday in the 12600 block of Sunswept Avenue. Flores also uses the names Mario Gonzalez Villa and Mario Villa Gonzalez, said Police Lt. John Woods. Anyone with information is asked to call investigators at (714) 741-5704.
NEWS
April 18, 1986
Three Salvadoran military officers have been accused of carrying out the abductions of prominent businessmen between 1982 and 1986. Two men arrested in connection with two right-wing kidnaping rings told a military judge that Col. Roberto Mauricio Staben, Col. Joaquin Zacapa and Maj. Jose Alfredo Jimenez were involved in at least five abductions. Staben, who has since been removed as commander of the elite, U.S.-trained Arce battalion, and Jimenez are being held in San Salvador.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | ERNESTO LECHNER
*** Various artists, "Y Sigue Siendo el Rey," BMG. A tacky concept with unexpectedly beautiful results. As a tribute to Jose Alfredo Jimenez, a marvelous composer of rancheras who died 25 years ago, a handful of Latin stars recorded "duets" with recordings of the late musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | VICTOR VALLE
After starting out with a harsh, warbling vibrato, Vicente Fernandez quickly put his powerful tenor aright Friday evening to prove why he's still the king of rancheras , a Mexican ballad style roughly akin to country music. But to say that Fernandez sang well in the first of his two evenings at Anaheim's Celebrity Theatre isn't enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ask UCLA ethnomusicology professor Steve Loza, "Que pasa?," the initial answer is simple: The late Jose Alfredo Jimenez is being pimped. Jimenez is the most famous and beloved singer-songwriter Mexico has ever known--a man equal parts genius and romantic whose tear 'n' tequila-stained lyrics were drenched in a tragic reality. He spent his short life scribbling hundreds of brilliant ranchera and mariachi standards onto soggy bar napkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | VICTOR VALLE
Sometimes an artist can subvert a carefully crafted image with a sudden change in repertoire. Consider Venezuelan heartthrob singer-actor Jose Luis Rodriguez's performance on Friday at the Universal Amphitheatre. Maybe it was because the half-empty, 6,250-seat house failed to inspire Rodriguez. Maybe it was because the Spanish-language soap and film star has matured too much to be taken for the ravenous, lovesick Puma for which he is nicknamed.
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