Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJose Antonio Burciaga
IN THE NEWS

Jose Antonio Burciaga

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1996
Jose Antonio Burciaga, 56, author and artist who was an expert on Chicanismo. For the past decade a resident fellow at Stanford University, Burciaga was born in El Paso and studied at the University of Texas, Corcoran School of Art, Juarez-Lincoln Center of Antioch University and San Francisco Art Institute. After service in the Air Force, he settled in Northern California, where he founded a publishing company, Disenos Literarios.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009
My family and I have followed the work of Culture Clash since their beginnings and enjoyed the article on their development and current projects ["Shadow Play," Oct. 25]. Their themes and approaches appear to mirror the social-political journey of the varied Latino groups in the U.S., and interestingly enough one starts to see in the specific stories the universality of the struggles, joys and humor that characterizes all people who have been "outsiders." My only disappointment in this article was the omission of Jose Antonio Burciaga's contributions and influence on Culture Clash.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | RICHARD MONTOYA HERBERT SIGUENZA and RIC SALINAS (aka CULTURE CLASH), SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jose Antonio Burciaga was an iconoclastic artist--a strong-willed essayist, poet, writer, humorist and muralist. He also was a founding member of Culture Clash, active with us from 1984 to 1989. At a memorial recently at the small Mission Carmel church near his home in Monterey, he was remembered by the family priest as, first and foremost, "a great Chicano," and that he was. On Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006 | By Richard Montoya, Special to The Times
I have a responsibility to my audience. Lou Dobbs has a responsibility to his. Of course, I would like to think the comparisons stop here. But, alas, we're both in the entertainment biz, and we both veer into the political. When Culture Clash was born in 1984, we did not know who our audience would be. We had entered the rough-and-tumble world of performance art and stand-up comedy. The political Chicano Teatro Movement — a genre born of out of the rural farmworker struggle and its city cousin, the early student protests during the Vietnam War — had already seen its best, most urgent days, and that movement now left us off somewhere between the art galleries of the Mission District and the comedy clubs of the suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009
My family and I have followed the work of Culture Clash since their beginnings and enjoyed the article on their development and current projects ["Shadow Play," Oct. 25]. Their themes and approaches appear to mirror the social-political journey of the varied Latino groups in the U.S., and interestingly enough one starts to see in the specific stories the universality of the struggles, joys and humor that characterizes all people who have been "outsiders." My only disappointment in this article was the omission of Jose Antonio Burciaga's contributions and influence on Culture Clash.
MAGAZINE
December 9, 1990
Besides the sexist title, "The Cowboy and the Good Ol' Girl" (by J. Michael Kennedy, Oct. 21), about the Texas gubernatorial race between Ann Richards and Clayton Williams Jr., your Houston correspondent, J. Michael Kennedy, presents two very telling references to the heavily Mexican-American populated state of Texas. In the first reference, Kennedy tells about Clayton Williams singing his "Spanish favorites." They are either Spanish-language favorites or Mexican, not Spanish. As the late, former Los Angeles Times columnist Ruben Salazar wrote, "the word Mexican has been dragged through the mud of racism since the Anglos arrived in the Southwest," so that not many Anglos want to use it. Kennedy's only reference to "Mexican" is when he mentions Clayton Williams "as a teen-ager had gone to Mexican border towns to be 'serviced' by hookers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006 | By Richard Montoya, Special to The Times
I have a responsibility to my audience. Lou Dobbs has a responsibility to his. Of course, I would like to think the comparisons stop here. But, alas, we're both in the entertainment biz, and we both veer into the political. When Culture Clash was born in 1984, we did not know who our audience would be. We had entered the rough-and-tumble world of performance art and stand-up comedy. The political Chicano Teatro Movement — a genre born of out of the rural farmworker struggle and its city cousin, the early student protests during the Vietnam War — had already seen its best, most urgent days, and that movement now left us off somewhere between the art galleries of the Mission District and the comedy clubs of the suburbs.
BOOKS
February 28, 1993 | Luis J. Rodriguez, Rodriguez is an award-winning poet, journalist and critic. His latest book, "Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A." (Curbstone Press, 1993) is about growing up Chicano in Watts and East Los Angeles.
I wrote a poem once in which a nun asks a Mexican immigrant girl, "Who is God?" Nervous and fearful, the girl stands up and replies: "God is a string bean." The class erupts into an uproar. The nun gasps in horror. Armed with a ruler, she rushes up to the girl and whacks the inside of the girl's hand. Unfortunately, it is some time before the nun realizes that the girl has said, "God is a supreme being."
BOOKS
April 12, 1987 | Alejandro Morales, Morales recently finished his fourth novel, "Suns of Morning."
Roland Hinojosa's writings have put him in the forefront of contemporary Chicano narrative. He was the first Chicano to be awarded the prestigious Casa de las Americas international literary award (in 1976, for his novel "Klail city y sus alrededores"). Writing in Spanish (though most of his works have been translated to English), he has created in his "Klail City Death Trip" series a fictional Chicano community in the Rio Grande Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | RICHARD MONTOYA HERBERT SIGUENZA and RIC SALINAS (aka CULTURE CLASH), SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jose Antonio Burciaga was an iconoclastic artist--a strong-willed essayist, poet, writer, humorist and muralist. He also was a founding member of Culture Clash, active with us from 1984 to 1989. At a memorial recently at the small Mission Carmel church near his home in Monterey, he was remembered by the family priest as, first and foremost, "a great Chicano," and that he was. On Oct.
NEWS
October 11, 1996
Jose Antonio Burciaga, 56, author and artist who was an expert on Chicanismo. For the past decade a resident fellow at Stanford University, Burciaga was born in El Paso and studied at the University of Texas, Corcoran School of Art, Juarez-Lincoln Center of Antioch University and San Francisco Art Institute. After service in the Air Force, he settled in Northern California, where he founded a publishing company, Disenos Literarios.
BOOKS
February 28, 1993 | Luis J. Rodriguez, Rodriguez is an award-winning poet, journalist and critic. His latest book, "Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A." (Curbstone Press, 1993) is about growing up Chicano in Watts and East Los Angeles.
I wrote a poem once in which a nun asks a Mexican immigrant girl, "Who is God?" Nervous and fearful, the girl stands up and replies: "God is a string bean." The class erupts into an uproar. The nun gasps in horror. Armed with a ruler, she rushes up to the girl and whacks the inside of the girl's hand. Unfortunately, it is some time before the nun realizes that the girl has said, "God is a supreme being."
MAGAZINE
December 9, 1990
Besides the sexist title, "The Cowboy and the Good Ol' Girl" (by J. Michael Kennedy, Oct. 21), about the Texas gubernatorial race between Ann Richards and Clayton Williams Jr., your Houston correspondent, J. Michael Kennedy, presents two very telling references to the heavily Mexican-American populated state of Texas. In the first reference, Kennedy tells about Clayton Williams singing his "Spanish favorites." They are either Spanish-language favorites or Mexican, not Spanish. As the late, former Los Angeles Times columnist Ruben Salazar wrote, "the word Mexican has been dragged through the mud of racism since the Anglos arrived in the Southwest," so that not many Anglos want to use it. Kennedy's only reference to "Mexican" is when he mentions Clayton Williams "as a teen-ager had gone to Mexican border towns to be 'serviced' by hookers.
BOOKS
April 12, 1987 | Alejandro Morales, Morales recently finished his fourth novel, "Suns of Morning."
Roland Hinojosa's writings have put him in the forefront of contemporary Chicano narrative. He was the first Chicano to be awarded the prestigious Casa de las Americas international literary award (in 1976, for his novel "Klail city y sus alrededores"). Writing in Spanish (though most of his works have been translated to English), he has created in his "Klail City Death Trip" series a fictional Chicano community in the Rio Grande Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1995
Many complaints are expressed regarding illegal immigrants attending the California state universities. Most of these illegal immigrants are taxpaying (residents) of the State of California. They also contribute to the Social Security fund but will never receive these benefits, since this is generally done with an illegal Social Security number. One never hears complaints about out-of-state students, many of whom come here, establish bogus residency, and then benefit from the lower tuition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Famous people who donate their papers to university libraries are usually older than 43, 44 or 45. But those are the ages of the members of Culture Clash, the comedy trio that just donated two decades of memorabilia to Cal State Northridge. No, they're not retiring. "We're not ready to put it into mothballs yet," said Culture Clash member Richard Montoya.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|