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Jose Armand

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"People have been dismissing (Los Angeles' Spanish-speaking) population as uneducated or perhaps culturally insensitive--we think that is a myth," said Jose Armand, director of the unprecedented Festival Latino L.A., as he announced the more than 20 scheduled programs for the May 2-27 arts festival at a Wednesday press conference. "The idea is to promote Latino culture and make it part of the mainstream . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"People have been dismissing (Los Angeles' Spanish-speaking) population as uneducated or perhaps culturally insensitive--we think that is a myth," said Jose Armand, director of the unprecedented Festival Latino L.A., as he announced the more than 20 scheduled programs for the May 2-27 arts festival at a Wednesday press conference. "The idea is to promote Latino culture and make it part of the mainstream . . .
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1989 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
It's midnight in Tijuana, and the border town is hopping. Jose Armand, a Los Angeles theater producer, is guiding a cadre of associates through the touristy Avenida Revolucion, a boulevard about to vroom into high gear. Drunk American jocks tote six packs; donkey-cart drivers offer Polaroids and the promise of immortality; and lost suburbanites who've been separated from tour groups whine helplessly. "It's T.J.," Armand comments to his L.A. compadres . "And anything can happen."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1989 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
It's midnight in Tijuana, and the border town is hopping. Jose Armand, a Los Angeles theater producer, is guiding a cadre of associates through the touristy Avenida Revolucion, a boulevard about to vroom into high gear. Drunk American jocks tote six packs; donkey-cart drivers offer Polaroids and the promise of immortality; and lost suburbanites who've been separated from tour groups whine helplessly. "It's T.J.," Armand comments to his L.A. compadres . "And anything can happen."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1989
Who is Jose Armand? I am a visual artist and I have been active in the Latino community and art community for more than 12 years. Neither I nor my colleagues have ever heard of Mr. Armand. So you can imagine my surprise to see him referred to as "the most vocal spokesman for Latino arts and multicultural dialogue in Los Angeles." DANIEL J. MARTINEZ Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A standing-room-only crowd of 300 Latino artists assembled in East Los Angeles on Monday night to voice their hopes for how money from the new $20-million Los Angeles Endowment for the Arts is spent. The throng, like recent gatherings of musicians and Skid Row and black artists, expressed a variety of needs for the municipal cultural plan whose spending guidelines are still being developed.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea of Festival Latino L.A., says director Jose Armand, is to make Latino culture part of the mainstream, "to provide an umbrella for the different Latin American communities that are here and to provide a visibility for Latino culture." Those goals are being carried out with a flourish in more than 20 programs in the Latino art festival, which ends May 27.
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