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Jose Azcona Hoyo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo will meet President Reagan and President-elect Bush in Washington next week ahead of a Central American summit, according to a government official. Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras said Wednesday that Azcona would meet the U.S. leaders next Tuesday. Azcona would likely discuss U.S. economic aid to Tegucigalpa and the future of Nicaraguan rebels living in bases in Honduras, he said.
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NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
The federal prosecutor's office announced Tuesday that it will charge a former president and other senior officials with illegally extraditing a drug trafficker to the United States. Never before has a former Honduran president faced similar charges. The case grew out of the kidnapping, torture and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985.
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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | From Reuters
Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo was quoted Tuesday as saying he wants U.S.-backed Contras to leave his country early next year. "This problem will have to be solved in some way in the first months of next year," he told the Spanish newspaper El Pais when asked when the Contras, who fight Nicaragua's Sandinista government from bases in Honduras, would leave. "If they receive military aid, they will have to go fight in Nicaragua.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The presidents of five Central American countries, ignoring direct appeals from President Bush to go slow, agreed in principle Sunday to start dismantling the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebel army within weeks. "The presidents have reached a consensus that this plan should go forward right away," President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua said during a break in the talks in this Caribbean banana port.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Reuters
This Central American nation will forge ahead with a plan for the disbanding of U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras despite President Bush's insistence that the rebel army not be demobilized until there is democracy in Nicaragua, a senior official said Friday. "We respect the point of view of the U.S. government, but President (Jose) Azcona (Hoyo) has expressed very clearly that he will follow his own interests," Honduran Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras told reporters.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
The federal prosecutor's office announced Tuesday that it will charge a former president and other senior officials with illegally extraditing a drug trafficker to the United States. Never before has a former Honduran president faced similar charges. The case grew out of the kidnapping, torture and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency agent Enrique Camarena in Mexico in 1985.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In what could be a breakthrough in Central America's stalled peace efforts, Honduras gave qualified support Friday to a Nicaraguan government proposal for disarming and resettling idled Nicaraguan rebels who want to leave their military camps in Honduras. Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo gave his response after hearing the proposal from Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and discussing it with Vice President Dan Quayle. Honduran and U.S.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The presidents of five Central American countries, ignoring direct appeals from President Bush to go slow, agreed in principle Sunday to start dismantling the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebel army within weeks. "The presidents have reached a consensus that this plan should go forward right away," President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua said during a break in the talks in this Caribbean banana port.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration has won support from Nicaragua's neighbors for a new American plan to keep anti-Sandinista rebels idled in Honduras, with only non-military aid, until after elections in Nicaragua next February.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Presidents of the five Central American nations agreed Tuesday to devise a plan within 90 days to demobilize the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebel army and remove its guerrillas from bases in Honduras. In return, Nicaragua's Sandinista government pledged to hold internationally supervised elections by next February, nine months earlier than scheduled, to free more than 1,600 political prisoners and to give opposition parties "equal access" to state-run broadcast media.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Reuters
This Central American nation will forge ahead with a plan for the disbanding of U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras despite President Bush's insistence that the rebel army not be demobilized until there is democracy in Nicaragua, a senior official said Friday. "We respect the point of view of the U.S. government, but President (Jose) Azcona (Hoyo) has expressed very clearly that he will follow his own interests," Honduran Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras told reporters.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration has won support from Nicaragua's neighbors for a new American plan to keep anti-Sandinista rebels idled in Honduras, with only non-military aid, until after elections in Nicaragua next February.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Presidents of the five Central American nations agreed Tuesday to devise a plan within 90 days to demobilize the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebel army and remove its guerrillas from bases in Honduras. In return, Nicaragua's Sandinista government pledged to hold internationally supervised elections by next February, nine months earlier than scheduled, to free more than 1,600 political prisoners and to give opposition parties "equal access" to state-run broadcast media.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
In what could be a breakthrough in Central America's stalled peace efforts, Honduras gave qualified support Friday to a Nicaraguan government proposal for disarming and resettling idled Nicaraguan rebels who want to leave their military camps in Honduras. Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo gave his response after hearing the proposal from Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and discussing it with Vice President Dan Quayle. Honduran and U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | From Reuters
Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo will meet President Reagan and President-elect Bush in Washington next week ahead of a Central American summit, according to a government official. Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras said Wednesday that Azcona would meet the U.S. leaders next Tuesday. Azcona would likely discuss U.S. economic aid to Tegucigalpa and the future of Nicaraguan rebels living in bases in Honduras, he said.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | From Reuters
Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo was quoted Tuesday as saying he wants U.S.-backed Contras to leave his country early next year. "This problem will have to be solved in some way in the first months of next year," he told the Spanish newspaper El Pais when asked when the Contras, who fight Nicaragua's Sandinista government from bases in Honduras, would leave. "If they receive military aid, they will have to go fight in Nicaragua.
NEWS
February 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer and
Emperor Hirohito, a man once despised by much of the world as the symbol of ruthless Japanese military aggression, was honored by the international community today as kings, presidents and other representatives of 163 countries attended his elaborate state funeral.
NEWS
March 25, 1987 | From Reuters
President Reagan's special envoy to Central America, Philip C. Habib, left Honduras on Tuesday after discussing a new regional peace initiative with President Jose Azcona Hoyo.
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