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Jose Behar

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July 27, 1995 | CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selena's dream of crossing over strongly from Latin-music stardom to the U.S. pop charts was realized last week when her posthumous "Dreaming of You" became the nation's best-selling album in its first week in the stores, SoundScan reported Wednesday. By selling 331,000 copies, the collection not only became the biggest first-week seller by a female artist since SoundScan began monitoring U.S. sales in 1992, but also became the first album by a Latin artist to debut at No.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez is a Times staff writer
Maybe he's not quite as hunky as Ricky Martin. And no one really knows if he can sing. But that doesn't matter. Jose Behar is still one of the two most powerful men in the U.S. Latin music industry--and by far the most powerful Latin music executive in Los Angeles. Indeed, nationally, the only other person to wield as much power is producer Emilio Estefan. Behar, 42, is president and CEO of EMI Latin, the nation's second-largest Latin music label.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez is a Times staff writer
Maybe he's not quite as hunky as Ricky Martin. And no one really knows if he can sing. But that doesn't matter. Jose Behar is still one of the two most powerful men in the U.S. Latin music industry--and by far the most powerful Latin music executive in Los Angeles. Indeed, nationally, the only other person to wield as much power is producer Emilio Estefan. Behar, 42, is president and CEO of EMI Latin, the nation's second-largest Latin music label.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1995 | CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selena's dream of crossing over strongly from Latin-music stardom to the U.S. pop charts was realized last week when her posthumous "Dreaming of You" became the nation's best-selling album in its first week in the stores, SoundScan reported Wednesday. By selling 331,000 copies, the collection not only became the biggest first-week seller by a female artist since SoundScan began monitoring U.S. sales in 1992, but also became the first album by a Latin artist to debut at No.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999
Recording academy President Michael Greene will moderate "Road to the Latin Grammy Awards," an Oct. 21 panel discussion about the nascent Latin Grammy Awards program and the rising profile of Latin music. Scheduled panelists include music producer Emilio Estefan, EMI Latin President Jose Behar and Mauricio Abaroa, executive director of the Latin Recording Academy. The panel will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, 3402 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1995 | STEVE BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Things seem normal at Q Productions, a former body shop turned recording facility near the airport of this South Texas coastal city. Big semis loaded with musical equipment churn up dust in the chalky parking lot. Over the roar of the engines, men yell at each other in Spanish. A tejano band is in the studio, putting final touches on an album of the accordion-based music that dominates the region. In the front office, the phone rings constantly.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
The dispute over a Chicago Teachers Union election widened Friday as the national teachers union said the winner should take over as president, while the incumbent refused to relinquish the keys to the office. The American Federation of Teachers said Friday that Marilyn Stewart should assume the presidency while the dispute over her 566-vote election victory was resolved.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language television network, will announce today the formation of its own record label and its multimillion-dollar purchase of a 50% stake in one of Mexico's hottest labels. The move immediately should make Univision chief Jerry Perenchio a player in the nation's $600-million Latin music market. Perenchio will try to boost sales by providing Univision network air time to advertise albums from the two labels, sources said.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | Lisa Girion
A suburban Chicago assembly-line worker who was fired for saying "good day" in Spanish, and eight others dismissed or disciplined for violating the company's English-only rule, won $192,500 in a court-approved settlement. "This was a plant and an assembly line where most people worked independently of each other, so we don't believe there was a legitimate purpose for this rule," said Jose J. Behar of the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1999 | MARTHA IRVIN, Martha Irvine writes for Associated Press
Carlos Solero couldn't believe his ears when his bosses started reprimanding him for speaking Spanish. "Even if I was singing to myself or just mumbling, I would get a warning," the 31-year-old said of the English-only policy his bosses instituted at a suburban Chicago manufacturing plant two years ago. The company said the policy was needed to improve communication on its assembly line. Eventually Solero was asked to sign a work agreement that included the policy, but he refused.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | JESSE KATZ and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Latin music sensation Selena, a 23-year-old Grammy winner who delighted audiences with her unpretentious blend of bouncy pop and tender ballads, died Friday afternoon after being shot twice at a Days Inn hotel here, allegedly by the former president of her fan club. In a bizarre standoff with police, the woman suspected of shooting Selena locked herself inside a red pickup truck in the hotel parking lot for more than nine hours, threatening to commit suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | ALISA VALDES-RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin music, already labeled the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. market, may be even more popular than is widely recognized, according to a new study by the Recording Industry Assn. of America. The study--the association's first on the music-buying habits of U.S.
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