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Jose Cruz Gonzalez

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
South Coast Repertory is the first of seven Southern California arts organizations to detail its plans for its share of $3.65 million in grants that the James Irvine Foundation issued this month in hopes of prodding arts groups to go to the people rather than waiting for the people to come to them. The San Francisco-based foundation is a leading force in the funding of California nonprofit arts groups, funneling more than $16.5 million to them annually. It recently tweaked its grant-making strategy to encourage new approaches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
South Coast Repertory is the first of seven Southern California arts organizations to detail its plans for its share of $3.65 million in grants that the James Irvine Foundation issued this month in hopes of prodding arts groups to go to the people rather than waiting for the people to come to them. The San Francisco-based foundation is a leading force in the funding of California nonprofit arts groups, funneling more than $16.5 million to them annually. It recently tweaked its grant-making strategy to encourage new approaches.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, South Coast Repertory's sincere youth production of Jose Cruz Gonzalez's new seasonal play, "Marisol's Christmas," achieved surprising depth to deliver a heartfelt, universal message of a loving family's struggle to stay together and reach for the American Dream. That message doesn't reach as deeply at the Falcon Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1992, South Coast Repertory's sincere youth production of Jose Cruz Gonzalez's new seasonal play, "Marisol's Christmas," achieved surprising depth to deliver a heartfelt, universal message of a loving family's struggle to stay together and reach for the American Dream. That message doesn't reach as deeply at the Falcon Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2001 | IRENE LACHER, Irene Lacher is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In the mind of Jose Cruz Gonzalez, comets wear roller skates, suitcases hold butterflies and men levitate to the sky after making love to a woman who cannot love them in return. In the plays of Gonzalez, those wonders actually take place before your eyes. Well, perhaps not actually, but, then, that's where the art of theater shows its hand. "If you find the right collaborators," says the soft-spoken Gonzalez, "anything is possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996 | Jan Herman, Jan Herman is a Times staff writer
Jose Cruz Gonzalez, a Mexican American, has been crossing borders all his life. "I always feel like I'm on one side of the fence or the other," he says, "or I'm on the fence about to cross over." The soft-spoken writer-director--looking earnest yet casual in wire-frame glasses, jeans and a collarless shirt--was sitting on an office sofa at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, talking about his upcoming departure from the nationally recognized Latino play-development program he founded here.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1988 | JAN HERMAN
At South Coast Repertory, the pen is mightier than the colors. The theater in Costa Mesa plans to take on Orange County gangs with a 30-minute play to be written by Roy Conboy of Garden Grove. The production will tour junior and senior high schools countywide. "We're thinking about doing it in February or March," says Jose Cruz Gonzalez, who heads SCR's Hispanic Playwrights Project. "We want to give children the idea that they don't have to join a gang for self-esteem."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2001
It is rare to come across such an inspirational story as that of acclaimed playwright and professor Jose Cruz Gonzalez ("Conjuring Up Immigrant Dreams," by Irene Lacher, Nov. 25). This brilliant artist has transcended the label "Hispanic playwright." His story is universal and relevant. As a teacher and fellow Latino writer-director, I know how difficult it is to make it in the entertainment world. It is refreshing to read that Gonzalez has gained well-deserved prominence as a playwright and director while remaining true to his Chicano roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1998
7pm / Theater A.S.K. Theatre Project's free "Common Ground Festival '98" offers new works, theater labs and a theater fair, featuring such noted performers, directors and playwrights as John Fleck, Rachel Rosenthal, Maria Irene Fornes and Jose Cruz Gonzalez. * "Common Ground Festival '98," UCLA, North Campus, (parking lot 3), Westwood. Today, 7 p.m. and Saturday, 9 p.m.: "The Unexpurgated Virgin," with the Rachel Rosenthal Co. and Amy Knowles. Today, 9 p.m. and Friday, 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2001 | IRENE LACHER, Irene Lacher is an occasional contributor to Calendar
In the mind of Jose Cruz Gonzalez, comets wear roller skates, suitcases hold butterflies and men levitate to the sky after making love to a woman who cannot love them in return. In the plays of Gonzalez, those wonders actually take place before your eyes. Well, perhaps not actually, but, then, that's where the art of theater shows its hand. "If you find the right collaborators," says the soft-spoken Gonzalez, "anything is possible."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1996 | Jan Herman, Jan Herman is a Times staff writer
Jose Cruz Gonzalez, a Mexican American, has been crossing borders all his life. "I always feel like I'm on one side of the fence or the other," he says, "or I'm on the fence about to cross over." The soft-spoken writer-director--looking earnest yet casual in wire-frame glasses, jeans and a collarless shirt--was sitting on an office sofa at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, talking about his upcoming departure from the nationally recognized Latino play-development program he founded here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1987
"Buscando America/Seeking America," a play about America as a multicultural society, is being given a premiere run this week at Rancho Santiago College in Santa Ana. The play, developed by members of the community college's theater workshop, centers on the modern-day encounters of the ancient Mexican god, Quetzalcoatl, with immigrant families, war refugees and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1990
Broadway and television actress Carmen Zapata will open the 1990 Orange County Latino Performing Arts Festival at Cal State Fullerton on April 21. Zapata, a three-time Emmy nominee, will deliver a keynote address at 10 a.m. to open a free symposium entitled, "Latinos and Mainstream Theater: An Analytical and Futuristic Perspective." The symposium, which will run until 12:30 p.m., will be at the University Center Theater.
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