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NEWS
December 15, 1988
The commander of Argentina's army said that he made no deal with rebel troops to end a four-day mutiny earlier this month and declared that both sides have agreed on the need to preserve Argentine democracy. Gen. Jose Dante Caridi said he was annoyed by persistent reports suggesting that the resolution of the rebellion had compromised the army command and the central government. "Nothing of the sort happened," Caridi said.
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NEWS
December 15, 1988
The commander of Argentina's army said that he made no deal with rebel troops to end a four-day mutiny earlier this month and declared that both sides have agreed on the need to preserve Argentine democracy. Gen. Jose Dante Caridi said he was annoyed by persistent reports suggesting that the resolution of the rebellion had compromised the army command and the central government. "Nothing of the sort happened," Caridi said.
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NEWS
December 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Surrounded by tanks poised to attack, hundreds of mutinous Argentine soldiers gave up their three-day insurrection Sunday without winning a single concession, the government said. Officials vehemently denied an array of reports that the right-wing leader of the uprising, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, had surrendered in return for the resignation of the army's top commander, Gen. Jose Dante Caridi.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Surrounded by tanks poised to attack, hundreds of mutinous Argentine soldiers gave up their three-day insurrection Sunday without winning a single concession, the government said. Officials vehemently denied an array of reports that the right-wing leader of the uprising, Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, had surrendered in return for the resignation of the army's top commander, Gen. Jose Dante Caridi.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | Associated Press
The chiefs of Argentina's army, air force and navy resigned Tuesday, the army high command said in a statement. The moves came amid charges that the army commander made a deal with military rebels to end a four-day revolt earlier this month. The resignations appeared to be concessions to the mutineers and pose military and political problems for President Raul Alfonsin as he campaigns for May 14 presidential elections.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentina's army commander, Gen. Jose Dante Caridi, submitted his resignation Tuesday just two weeks after an army mutiny, deepening a serious conflict between the Argentine armed forces and the civilian government. In return for ending their four-day insurrection in early December, the 500 rebellious officers and troops claimed to have won Caridi's pledge to step down before Christmas.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin, who suppressed the third Argentine army uprising in less than two years earlier this month, on Wednesday challenged the armed forces to respect the constitution and "play by the rules of the democratic system." In an address to a rare joint session of Congress, the president directly criticized the military's past failures to subordinate itself to civilian rule, feeding a cycle of coups and instability.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
President Raul Alfonsin said Tuesday that by refusing to negotiate with army mutineers, the Argentine government repulsed "an attack against the sovereignty of the people and the institutions of the nation." The leader of the four-day revolt, right-wing Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin, was taken into custody earlier in the day after surrendering control of his several hundred rebels, most of whom were allowed to return to their units.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Thirty hours after capitulating, the leader of an army uprising finally delivered control of his troops to a loyalist general Monday night, calming fears that the insurrection had not yet been quelled. A rebel officer at the army base told reporters that Col. Mohamed Ali Seineldin "put himself at the disposition of the competent military judge" and will be transferred this morning to a place designated for his formal arrest. Gen.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Loyalist troops used mortars and rifle fire Friday to crush the third mutiny against the civilian Argentine government in 19 months, leaving one officer dead and at least two wounded, officials said. Vice President Victor Martinez declared late Friday night that the uprising had been suppressed and that the mutineers would be prosecuted. But the rebels remained in the army infantry school where they revolted early in the day, and it was unclear why they were not taken into custody.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A two-day-old army uprising escalated Saturday, belying the government's claim to have crushed it, and Argentine officials spoke openly for the first time of a nascent coup attempt. Hundreds of rebels, led by a Falklands War veteran demanding amnesty for human rights abuses and other crimes by the military, moved from a huge army base to a munitions base closer to the center of Buenos Aires.
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