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Jose Eduardo Dos Santos

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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel leader Jonas Savimbi said he would take part in a runoff election against President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who he said failed to win the needed 50% of the votes in the Sept. 29-30 election. Under pressure from Savimbi, officials have not released final results; partial returns showed Dos Santos with about 50%. Savimbi has charged vote fraud and hinted that his rebel group would renew the long civil war.
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NEWS
May 19, 1993 | From The Washington Post
President Clinton has been advised by the State Department and the National Security Council to recognize the Angolan government headed by Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who is under sharp military challenge by rebel forces formerly backed by the United States, Administration officials said Tuesday night.
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NEWS
July 9, 1989
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos said his government will resume direct talks with the UNITA rebel movement as soon as a cease-fire between the two sides is restored. The government suspended peace talks with the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola a week ago, saying the rebels led by Jonas Savimbi had violated a cease-fire agreed to June 22 in Zaire. Savimbi has denied violating the truce. The U.S.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | Times Wire Services
President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi are expected to meet Monday to try to resolve the political crisis that has threatened to revive Angola's civil war. The outlook is for a runoff election. The crisis arose when Savimbi challenged the tentative results of the Sept. 29-30 election, which showed Dos Santos getting more than half the vote.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | Times Wire Services
President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi are expected to meet Monday to try to resolve the political crisis that has threatened to revive Angola's civil war. The outlook is for a runoff election. The crisis arose when Savimbi challenged the tentative results of the Sept. 29-30 election, which showed Dos Santos getting more than half the vote.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | From The Washington Post
President Clinton has been advised by the State Department and the National Security Council to recognize the Angolan government headed by Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who is under sharp military challenge by rebel forces formerly backed by the United States, Administration officials said Tuesday night.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
A committee of African leaders Tuesday asked President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire to try to put faltering Angolan peace efforts back on track. The special eight-member peace committee on Angola also called for Mobutu to work toward mediating an end to military operations by the rebel National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III met Tuesday with Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and reported substantial progress toward bringing an end to the long-running civil war between U.S. and Soviet-backed armies there. Dos Santos told Baker he is ready to drop preconditions and agree to an early cease-fire in the war that has pitted the Angolan government, backed by the Soviets, against U.S.-backed insurgents of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic accord signed Friday to end the 16-year civil war in Angola is no ticket to peace and prosperity, but it offers the first glimmer of hope for democracy and economic recovery in what has been one of Africa's most troubled nations. "There are a lot of things that can still go wrong," said Gerald J. Bender, an international expert on Angola at USC. "But, basically, it's going to be surprisingly smooth for a country that just fought a long civil war."
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen years of civil war, central planning, corruption and salt air have turned this seaside capital of 2.5 million into Africa's most awesome ruins. Water taps often run dry. Sewage overflows into street gutters. Power outages are endemic. And tens of thousands of the destitute and hopeless camp in crumbling, abandoned buildings and beg for food.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel leader Jonas Savimbi said he would take part in a runoff election against President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who he said failed to win the needed 50% of the votes in the Sept. 29-30 election. Under pressure from Savimbi, officials have not released final results; partial returns showed Dos Santos with about 50%. Savimbi has charged vote fraud and hinted that his rebel group would renew the long civil war.
NEWS
October 16, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen years of civil war, central planning, corruption and salt air have turned this seaside capital of 2.5 million into Africa's most awesome ruins. Water taps often run dry. Sewage overflows into street gutters. Power outages are endemic. And tens of thousands of the destitute and hopeless camp in crumbling, abandoned buildings and beg for food.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic accord signed Friday to end the 16-year civil war in Angola is no ticket to peace and prosperity, but it offers the first glimmer of hope for democracy and economic recovery in what has been one of Africa's most troubled nations. "There are a lot of things that can still go wrong," said Gerald J. Bender, an international expert on Angola at USC. "But, basically, it's going to be surprisingly smooth for a country that just fought a long civil war."
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III met Tuesday with Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and reported substantial progress toward bringing an end to the long-running civil war between U.S. and Soviet-backed armies there. Dos Santos told Baker he is ready to drop preconditions and agree to an early cease-fire in the war that has pitted the Angolan government, backed by the Soviets, against U.S.-backed insurgents of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
A committee of African leaders Tuesday asked President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire to try to put faltering Angolan peace efforts back on track. The special eight-member peace committee on Angola also called for Mobutu to work toward mediating an end to military operations by the rebel National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA).
NEWS
July 9, 1989
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos said his government will resume direct talks with the UNITA rebel movement as soon as a cease-fire between the two sides is restored. The government suspended peace talks with the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola a week ago, saying the rebels led by Jonas Savimbi had violated a cease-fire agreed to June 22 in Zaire. Savimbi has denied violating the truce. The U.S.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Angola's two most powerful leaders ended their first meeting in four years Saturday by embracing and pledging to work together to end 20 years of civil war. President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi repeated a ritual that twice previously had failed to halt fighting.
WORLD
September 10, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos' ruling MPLA party won a landslide parliamentary election victory with nearly 82% of the vote, provisional results showed. UNITA, a former rebel group which is now the largest opposition party, won just over 10%, election officials said.
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