Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJose Figueres
IN THE NEWS

Jose Figueres

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Costa Rican President Jose Figueres, considered the father of peaceful modern democracy in his country and one of the most colorful elder statesmen of the Western Hemisphere, died Friday. He was 82. Don Pepe, as he was affectionately known, died at his home 10 miles east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Presidential spokesman Ana Lorena Vargas did not disclose the cause of death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending the most bitter election in modern Costa Rican history, voters Sunday chose as their next president the 39-year-old son of a national hero who had to overcome old murder allegations to stay in the race. Opposition candidate Jose Maria Figueres appeared well on his way to defeating businessman Miguel Angel Rodriguez of the ruling Social Christian Unity Party, early returns showed. Rodriguez conceded Sunday night, pledging to heal the deep wounds opened by the acrimonious campaign.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The mountaintop chalet of Jose Figueres is a suitably Olympian setting for the one-time rebel who fathered modern Costa Rica's democracy. From the front step, Figueres can look for miles across the land he helped pacify 40 years ago, and, like a pint-sized Zeus in a gray wool suit, thunder at the folly of the mortals below.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Costa Rican President Jose Figueres, considered the father of peaceful modern democracy in his country and one of the most colorful elder statesmen of the Western Hemisphere, died Friday. He was 82. Don Pepe, as he was affectionately known, died at his home 10 miles east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Presidential spokesman Ana Lorena Vargas did not disclose the cause of death.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending the most bitter election in modern Costa Rican history, voters Sunday chose as their next president the 39-year-old son of a national hero who had to overcome old murder allegations to stay in the race. Opposition candidate Jose Maria Figueres appeared well on his way to defeating businessman Miguel Angel Rodriguez of the ruling Social Christian Unity Party, early returns showed. Rodriguez conceded Sunday night, pledging to heal the deep wounds opened by the acrimonious campaign.
OPINION
December 15, 2013 | By David P. Barash
On Dec. 1, 1948 - 65 years ago this month - Jose Figueres, then president of Costa Rica, made a fiery and eloquent speech, after which he took a sledgehammer and bashed a hole in a huge stone wall at the nation's military headquarters, Cuartel Bellavista. Its imposing towers and massive gates had loomed over the capital city of San Jose since 1917, the country's premier symbol of military power and the home of the "Tico" military establishment. Figueres was not just being a showman; he was announcing something truly extraordinary: Henceforth, Costa Rica would take the almost unheard-of step of renouncing its military.
WORLD
October 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Costa Rican President Jose Maria Figueres has resigned as chief executive of the World Economic Forum after confirming that he received more than $900,000 for consulting services to the French telecommunications company Alcatel, the forum said. Former President Miguel Angel Rodriguez resigned this month as head of the Organization of American States over alleged payments from Alcatel.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1993 | Christopher Reynolds
Costa Rica's name, like much of American civilization, can be traced back to one of Christopher Columbus's mistakes. He arrived on the Caribbean coast in 1502, met some friendly indigenous people and surmised that there was gold to be had, and an empire to be vanquished. A rich coast, he figured. Costa Rica . Instead, subsequent Spaniards found, the land was not particularly mineral-rich, and the indigenous population was small, widely scattered and reluctant to be colonized.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Voters who blamed the president for ruining the economy chose a conservative economist from the main opposition party Sunday as their next president. "It's a big responsibility," Miguel Angel Rodriguez said after early results indicated he had won the presidency. "We have to take Costa Rica onto the bridge toward progress." According to early results, Rodriguez of the Social Christian Unity Party had 47.9% of the vote, compared with 45.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say it loud or say it soft, it's never going to roll off anyone's tongue: FTAA, pronounced "ftaah." That's the acronym for the name U.S. and other negotiators came up with for the trading zone they plan to build among the nations of the Western Hemisphere: the Free Trade Area of the Americas. Earlier, officials had expected the new pact to be dubbed the Americas Free Trade Area, which produces a more mellifluous AFTA.
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The mountaintop chalet of Jose Figueres is a suitably Olympian setting for the one-time rebel who fathered modern Costa Rica's democracy. From the front step, Figueres can look for miles across the land he helped pacify 40 years ago, and, like a pint-sized Zeus in a gray wool suit, thunder at the folly of the mortals below.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National University of Mexico.
Not often do the internal and sometimes Byzantine debates of Latin American politics acquire an international dimension. It is all the more surprising, then, to see how the political dispute over President Alan Garcia's nationalization of the banking system in Peru has extended well beyond that country's borders.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect
A side effect of the end of the Cold War has been a perverse escalation in arms sales to the Third World. U.S. arms makers are by far the leading weapons merchants, accounting for nearly half of all such sales. Oscar Arias, the former president of Costa Rica who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1987 for brokering peace in Central America, is currently in the United States, giving lectures and trying to shift U.S. policy. But with American arms makers seeking new customers and U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|