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Jose Funes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995 | KAREN D'SOUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Funes left his native El Salvador for the United States at 15, arriving lost and alone without his family. Funes almost joined a gang just to belong to something. But five years later, he realizes he belongs to something much larger: a whole culture. "I know I have Indian blood inside me. I feel part of that culture and every time I pick up an Indian flute or a drum--I feel that connection and I feel proud," he said. "I know who I am."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995 | KAREN D'SOUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Funes left his native El Salvador for the United States at 15, arriving lost and alone without his family. Funes almost joined a gang just to belong to something. But five years later, he realizes he belongs to something much larger: a whole culture. "I know I have Indian blood inside me. I feel part of that culture and every time I pick up an Indian flute or a drum--I feel that connection and I feel proud," he said. "I know who I am."
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WORLD
August 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Pope Benedict XVI has appointed a new director of the Vatican Observatory, replacing the Rev. George Coyne, a vocal opponent of "intelligent design" theory who had held the post since 1978. It was unclear whether the move reflected disapproval over Coyne's opposition to the theory that the world is too complex to have been created by natural events alone. He has attacked the theory as a "religious movement" lacking scientific merit. He could not be reached for comment.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Believing that the universe may contain alien life does not contradict a faith in God, the Vatican's chief astronomer said in an interview published Tuesday. The Rev. Jose Gabriel Funes, the Jesuit director of the Vatican Observatory, was quoted as saying the vastness of the universe means it is possible there could be other forms of life outside Earth, even intelligent ones. "How can we rule out that life may have developed elsewhere?" Funes said. "Just as we consider earthly creatures as 'a brother' and 'sister,' why should we not talk about an 'extraterrestrial brother'?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2003 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Jose Funes, an Altadena deliveryman who works nights, awoke early Wednesday afternoon to a phone call from his fiancee, Julie Sundt. A landscape designer, she had a business meeting on the Westside and was going to pass the Santa Monica Farmers' Market on her way home. The couple had just visited the farmers market Saturday, and Sundt, a fan of the peaches and apricots, asked her husband-to-be Wednesday: You want something to eat? "It's up to you," Funes recalled saying.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | Marc Kaufman, Washington Post
In 1996, a meteorite from Mars found in Antarctica was reported to contain what could be fossilized remains of living organisms. That led then-Vice President Al Gore to convene a meeting of scientists, religious leaders and journalists to discuss the implications of a possible discovery of extraterrestrial life. Gore walked into the room armed with questions on notecards but, according to MIT physicist and associate provost Claude R. Canizares, he put them down and asked this first question: What would such a discovery mean to people of faith?
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Believing that there may be extraterrestrial life does not contradict a faith in God, the Vatican's chief astronomer said in a recent interview. Father Jose Gabriel Funes, the Jesuit director of the Vatican Observatory was quoted as saying the vastness of the universe means it is possible that there could be other forms of life outside Earth, even intelligent ones. "How can we rule out that life may have developed elsewhere?" Funes said. "Just as we consider earthly creatures as 'a brother,' and 'sister,' why should we not talk about an 'extraterrestrial brother'?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2008 | Steve Padilla, Times Staff Writer
The ongoing debate over whether religion and science comfortably coexist got more ammunition this month, and on both sides of the argument. This ammunition took thought-provoking forms -- a foundation dedicated to exploring provocative questions, a letter written in 1954 by Albert Einstein and a Vatican astronomer who said it's OK to believe in space aliens. Let's start with Einstein. The letter was sold at auction in London on May 15 for $404,000. Einstein, writing a year before his death to philosopher Eric Gutkind, said, "The word God is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honorable but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish."
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