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Jose Garcia De Lara

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October 28, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the nation's largest and oldest Latino civil rights organization wrested control of its charitable foundation from the foundation's board of directors Friday in a continuing dispute over the failure to account for up to $88,000 in donations. "This should be a lesson to all of us that we shouldn't be so loose with public money and the public trust," said Ruben Sandoval, special legal counsel to the president of the 140,000-member League of United Latin American Citizens.
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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the nation's largest and oldest Latino civil rights organization wrested control of its charitable foundation from the foundation's board of directors Friday in a continuing dispute over the failure to account for up to $88,000 in donations. "This should be a lesson to all of us that we shouldn't be so loose with public money and the public trust," said Ruben Sandoval, special legal counsel to the president of the 140,000-member League of United Latin American Citizens.
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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the nation's largest and oldest Latino civil rights organization wrested control of its charitable foundation from the foundation's board of directors Friday in a continuing dispute over a failure to account for as much as $88,000 in donations.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the nation's largest and oldest Latino civil rights organization wrested control of its charitable foundation from the foundation's board of directors Friday in a continuing dispute over a failure to account for as much as $88,000 in donations.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | DAVID SEDENO, Associated Press
More than 150 years ago, legend has it, William B. Travis, commander at the Alamo, drew a line across the grounds of the old Spanish mission. He asked his men to step over it and defend Texas against thousands of Mexican troops. Today, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, keepers of the Alamo for 84 years, are emulating Travis' legendary gesture as they battle with legislators and Latino leaders who want to wrest control of the historic battle site from the 6,000-member group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Harold Ezell, the top immigration official in the West, may have gained scores of new Latino friends with his sombrero-toting support of the amnesty program last year. But he probably could not find too many amigos within the League of United Latin American Citizens--or LULAC--some of whose members have been calling for Ezell's ouster. Unless, that is, the western regional commissioner of the U.S.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The Bellflower chapter of a national Latino organization has drawn heavy criticism from other members of the group for planning a reception to honor the West's top immigration official. The League of United Latin American Citizens in Bellflower announced plans to pay tribute to Harold W. Ezell, Western regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, for "outstanding service in 'bridging the gap' between the Hispanic community and the INS."
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, the tragedy. Then life's seamier side crept into this impoverished dot of a town on the Texas border. Enter the ambulance-chasers. This was the site of one of the worst school bus crashes in history. As a bright yellow bus, packed with about 80 students, was making its way to the nearby town of Mission last September, it was hit by a soft drink truck and plunged into a water-filled gravel pit. Twenty-one students were killed and dozens more were injured.
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