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Jose Greco

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER
If the name Jose Greco brings to mind the intricate, stern stomping you first learned to call flamenco while watching "The Ed Sullivan Show," you're only halfway to imagining the appeal of his son, Jose Greco II. Guest-starring Saturday night with Angelita and her company, Concierto Flamenco, in "Flamenco Fever" at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Taking flamenco out of intimate venues, where improvisational sparks fly, and putting it into a more lyrical, less spontaneous form for larger stages tends to wring the life out of it. Except on those rare occasions when it doesn't. Jose Greco II Flamenco Dance Company had a distinct advantage for "Gitanerias," its sold-out concert Sunday afternoon at the Robert B. Moore Theatre at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa--Greco himself.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Jose Greco, the Italian-born American dance star and choreographer who brought traditional Spanish culture to unprecedented popularity in the 1950s and '60s, has died. Greco died Sunday at his home in Lancaster, Pa. He was 82. A representative of Franklin and Marshall College, where Greco was an adjunct professor, attributed his death to heart failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still grieving over the death of his father in December, Jose Greco II sounds somber and a bit alone. "It's a lot more responsibility now," he said. "I'm the one that carries the name totally, the male." As for running the company his father created in 1988 for him, that too has changed. "Now I'm the boss. Things are not as easy as when I was just an employee. I'm much more mature and older, but not weaker, perhaps even stronger." Greco, 38, was speaking from Hampton, Va.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition
For nearly five generations of Americans, the name Jose Greco has been synonymous with Spanish dance. But when Greco comes to the Irvine Barclay Theatre tonight through Saturday, Orange County audiences will also see a second generation of family dancers. The 72-year-old patriarch will be joined by daughters Carmela, Lola and Alessandra, and son Jose Greco II. Jose Luis Greco, the eldest of his three sons, will serve as musical director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2001 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still grieving over the death of his father in December, Jose Greco II sounds somber and a bit alone. "It's a lot more responsibility now," he said. "I'm the one that carries the name totally, the male." As for running the company his father created in 1988 for him, that too has changed. "Now I'm the boss. Things are not as easy as when I was just an employee. I'm much more mature and older, but not weaker, perhaps even stronger." Greco, 38, was speaking from Hampton, Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1988 | EILEEN SONDAK
The adage that "the show must go on" applies as much to ballet as it does to Broadway. Rayna, the leader and lead dancer of Rayna's Spanish Ballet, was in an automobile accident about a week before her scheduled performances at SDSU's Studio Theatre, but she was on stage Friday and Saturday, doing a flamenco that seemed more intent on cracking a couple of ribs than nursing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
At 67, Jose Greco is no longer Jose Greco. One of the great bodies in dance--sinewy, resilient, nobly proportioned--has become top-heavy and tightly corseted, incapable of the elegant line and expressive freedom that used to define Greco as an artist. At the Wilshire Ebell Theatre on Tuesday, there weren't even the fleeting vestiges of greatness that marked Greco's dancing five years ago at the Greek Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | WALTER PRICE
"Some day the legs will just have to give out." That almost off-hand comment comes from Jose Greco, the Italian boy from Brooklyn who was possibly the greatest Spanish dancer of two generations. In the words of Arlene Croce, dance critic of the New Yorker magazine, "he may have been the greatest of all dance stars until the advent of Rudolf Nureyev."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER
The Jose Greco Company of Spanish dancers, singers and musicians looks and feels like a family, which is no surprise: Greco has brought together his two sons and his daughter, and combined them with other artists in a multifaceted performance troupe. His ensemble includes Miguel Cara Estaca, a compact man of a certain age who dances as if to keep demons at bay, his face alive with memories and dreams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Jose Greco, the Italian-born American dance star and choreographer who brought traditional Spanish culture to unprecedented popularity in the 1950s and '60s, has died. Greco died Sunday at his home in Lancaster, Pa. He was 82. A representative of Franklin and Marshall College, where Greco was an adjunct professor, attributed his death to heart failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER
If the name Jose Greco brings to mind the intricate, stern stomping you first learned to call flamenco while watching "The Ed Sullivan Show," you're only halfway to imagining the appeal of his son, Jose Greco II. Guest-starring Saturday night with Angelita and her company, Concierto Flamenco, in "Flamenco Fever" at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its only current Southern California appearance, the Jose Greco Spanish Dance Company made a mixed impression when it opened a three-day run Thursday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. The 11-member troupe replaced the originally scheduled Maria Benitez Spanish Dance Company, which withdrew from the dates because Benitez suffered a "temporary physical impairment," according to her manager.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition
For nearly five generations of Americans, the name Jose Greco has been synonymous with Spanish dance. But when Greco comes to the Irvine Barclay Theatre tonight through Saturday, Orange County audiences will also see a second generation of family dancers. The 72-year-old patriarch will be joined by daughters Carmela, Lola and Alessandra, and son Jose Greco II. Jose Luis Greco, the eldest of his three sons, will serve as musical director.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
The children of famous artists usually have to fight for their own place in the sun. Consider Jose Greco II, the son of probably the most well-known flamenco dancer of our time. "It never is a help to be the son of a famous person," Greco II, 29, said recently. "It's a very big obstacle. We have to fight people within the profession--and struggle with ourselves--to demonstrate how far we can go. "When your father is one of the best dancers in the world, you have to be 100 times better than him.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1991 | ELIZABETH ZIMMER
The Jose Greco Company of Spanish dancers, singers and musicians looks and feels like a family, which is no surprise: Greco has brought together his two sons and his daughter, and combined them with other artists in a multifaceted performance troupe. His ensemble includes Miguel Cara Estaca, a compact man of a certain age who dances as if to keep demons at bay, his face alive with memories and dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Taking flamenco out of intimate venues, where improvisational sparks fly, and putting it into a more lyrical, less spontaneous form for larger stages tends to wring the life out of it. Except on those rare occasions when it doesn't. Jose Greco II Flamenco Dance Company had a distinct advantage for "Gitanerias," its sold-out concert Sunday afternoon at the Robert B. Moore Theatre at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa--Greco himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
The children of famous artists usually have to fight for their own place in the sun. Consider Jose Greco II, the son of probably the most well-known flamenco dancer of our time. "It never is a help to be the son of a famous person," Greco II, 29, said recently. "It's a very big obstacle. We have to fight people within the profession--and struggle with ourselves--to demonstrate how far we can go. "When your father is one of the best dancers in the world, you have to be 100 times better than him.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1988 | EILEEN SONDAK
The adage that "the show must go on" applies as much to ballet as it does to Broadway. Rayna, the leader and lead dancer of Rayna's Spanish Ballet, was in an automobile accident about a week before her scheduled performances at SDSU's Studio Theatre, but she was on stage Friday and Saturday, doing a flamenco that seemed more intent on cracking a couple of ribs than nursing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
At 67, Jose Greco is no longer Jose Greco. One of the great bodies in dance--sinewy, resilient, nobly proportioned--has become top-heavy and tightly corseted, incapable of the elegant line and expressive freedom that used to define Greco as an artist. At the Wilshire Ebell Theatre on Tuesday, there weren't even the fleeting vestiges of greatness that marked Greco's dancing five years ago at the Greek Theatre.
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