Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJose Guadalupe Posada
IN THE NEWS

Jose Guadalupe Posada

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is tall, always elegantly dressed in sophisticated French couture from the turn of the century. She is sexy, confident and the object of desire. Nevermind that she's dead. Nevermind that she's actually, literally, a skeleton. Catrina was the name given to this skeleton figure now popularized in Mexican Day of the Dead folkloric art. She has become such an integrated part of Mexican culture that she has nearly eclipsed her creator.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2004 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Skeletons poured from the closet of Jose Guadalupe Posada's imagination. Cigar-chomping skeleton oligarchs and bloodied skeleton soldiers. Skeleton street sweepers and bowler-hatted businessmen, skeleton artists and skeleton musicians, plucking and banging their instruments in a hellish impromptu. In one of Posada's macabre engravings, a bony Catholic clergyman ominously tolls a bell.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2004 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Skeletons poured from the closet of Jose Guadalupe Posada's imagination. Cigar-chomping skeleton oligarchs and bloodied skeleton soldiers. Skeleton street sweepers and bowler-hatted businessmen, skeleton artists and skeleton musicians, plucking and banging their instruments in a hellish impromptu. In one of Posada's macabre engravings, a bony Catholic clergyman ominously tolls a bell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She is tall, always elegantly dressed in sophisticated French couture from the turn of the century. She is sexy, confident and the object of desire. Nevermind that she's dead. Nevermind that she's actually, literally, a skeleton. Catrina was the name given to this skeleton figure now popularized in Mexican Day of the Dead folkloric art. She has become such an integrated part of Mexican culture that she has nearly eclipsed her creator.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dancing skeletons, ruthless bandits, serene saints and rapacious politicians populate the raucous, multifaceted world depicted in the cheap broadsheets by Jose Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913) at Bryce Bannatyne Gallery. Before photography satisfied (and stimulated) modern society's appetite for sensational images of the news, Posada's prints illustrated stories, conveyed the gory details of natural disasters and outlined the back-stabbing viciousness of frontier politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2001 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
According to Gema M. Sandoval, artistic director of Danza Floricanto/USA, the Mexican holiday that honors the deceased, Dia de los Muertos , is little understood. Not so in her hands. On Friday at El Camino College's Marsee Auditorium, the company breathed jubilant life into the Los Angeles premiere of their nine-part suite, "Dia de los Muertos at the Local Cemetery."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2000
Today is the traditional celebration of Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), theMexican remembrance of those who have passed away. Here is a list of related public events: * Self-Help Graphics, 3802 Cesar Chavez Ave.; (323) 881-6444: Today, 5 p.m. gathering at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Lorena Street for 6 p.m. procession to Self-Help Graphics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1995
On the day when many Americans are thinking of goblins and the topical mask of the season--this year the face of Judge Lance A. Ito--there's also a tradition speaking from the history of Southern California and our neighbor, Mexico. This week marks the initial celebrations of Dia de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, a solemn yet festive occasion when the Latin culture remembers its dead while celebrating the joy of living.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
If you stand in a central spot in "The World of Agustin Victor Casasola, Mexico: 1900-1938," an exhibition of documentary photographs at UCLA's Frederick S. Wight Gallery, you get a capsule view of the Mexican photojournalist's expansive vision. Facing you is a photo mural of pre-revolution Mexican dignitaries, formally dressed and lined up for an official portrait.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2001
The Contemporary Crafts Market in Santa Monica will feature wares of more than 250 artists including decorative, functional and wearable art, home furnishings, jewelry and glassware. * Contemporary Crafts Market, Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 1855 Main St., Santa Monica, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Also Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. $6; children 12 and under are free. (310) 285-3655.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dancing skeletons, ruthless bandits, serene saints and rapacious politicians populate the raucous, multifaceted world depicted in the cheap broadsheets by Jose Guadalupe Posada (1852-1913) at Bryce Bannatyne Gallery. Before photography satisfied (and stimulated) modern society's appetite for sensational images of the news, Posada's prints illustrated stories, conveyed the gory details of natural disasters and outlined the back-stabbing viciousness of frontier politics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1985 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
KGTV's Nov. 2 live broadcast of the gala inaugural concert at Symphony Hall scored top marks in the ratings for that Saturday night, according to the television industry's November Arbitron figures. The three-hour program won or tied in every time slot but one. "We were pleasantly surprised," said Don Lundy, Channel 10's director of programming. The show drew an overall 11 for most of the program, or about 25% of the viewing audience that night. At 9:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Mexico's indigenous art was ferociously intense--from its pre-Columbian temples to its heroic revolutionary muralists and satirical popular artists. Mexican American artists inherited this heartfelt engagement with the realities of the spirit but gave it their own twist. The resulting aesthetic is seen in the Laguna Art Museum exhibition "Across the Street: Self-Help Graphics and Chicano Art in Los Angeles."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|