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Jose Guadalupe Saucedo

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February 3, 1991 | Robert Koehler, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to The Times.
If the cultural scene in Los Angeles is a great, multicultural experiment-in-the-making, then theater is the central laboratory. The experiment requires regular infusions of new blood. That is particularly true in the theater, where high costs and subscription audiences tend to force companies into safe, conservative choices. Yet those same companies know that without young artists with fresh perspectives, they will petrify and the new blood will flow to more lucrative veins.
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NEWS
October 13, 1995
Jose Guadalupe Saucedo, 42, the first Latino associate artist at the Mark Taper Forum. Saucedo was named to the influential post, as one of seven associate artists at the regional theater, in 1991. Born in Compton, he began his theatrical career while enrolled in UC Santa Barbara's Latin studies program. Encouraged by faculty member Jorge Huerta, Saucedo and others developed the Teatro Mecha and then took it beyond the campus to create Teatro de la Esperanza.
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NEWS
October 13, 1995
Jose Guadalupe Saucedo, 42, the first Latino associate artist at the Mark Taper Forum. Saucedo was named to the influential post, as one of seven associate artists at the regional theater, in 1991. Born in Compton, he began his theatrical career while enrolled in UC Santa Barbara's Latin studies program. Encouraged by faculty member Jorge Huerta, Saucedo and others developed the Teatro Mecha and then took it beyond the campus to create Teatro de la Esperanza.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | Robert Koehler, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to The Times.
If the cultural scene in Los Angeles is a great, multicultural experiment-in-the-making, then theater is the central laboratory. The experiment requires regular infusions of new blood. That is particularly true in the theater, where high costs and subscription audiences tend to force companies into safe, conservative choices. Yet those same companies know that without young artists with fresh perspectives, they will petrify and the new blood will flow to more lucrative veins.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY
Charles Dillingham's first challenge in his new job as managing director of Center Theatre Group may well be to save $1 million. The recent shortfall in fund raising for the Music Center's Unified Fund will lead to cutbacks at all of the center's resident groups, and the CTG--which programs the Mark Taper Forum and the Ahmanson seasons--is no exception. "We face a potential $1-million cut in this year's (planned $4.4-million) allocation," said the CTG's Gordon Davidson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY
Two shows just opened in the old Los Angeles Theatre Center building, and a number of other productions have made plans to use the municipal theater complex during the coming year. But will the city have enough money to keep the doors open? The city's Cultural Affairs Department has proposed using $750,000 in city funds to manage the building next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | Robert Koehler, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to The Times.
If the cultural scene in Los Angeles is a great, multicultural experiment-in-the-making, then theater is the central laboratory. The experiment requires regular infusions of new blood. That is particularly true in the theater, where high costs and subscription audiences tend to force companies into safe, conservative choices. Yet those same companies know that without young artists with fresh perspectives, they will petrify and the new blood will flow to more lucrative veins.
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