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Jose Gutierrez Rebollo

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NEWS
December 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate confirmed his nomination Tuesday over opposition protests, Mexico's new attorney general and his boss were cleaning house: replacing top law enforcement personnel with an unlikely mix of human rights and military officials to lead an intensified crackdown on drug trafficking and police corruption.
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NEWS
February 22, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Mexican government told the United States nothing of its suspicions about Mexico's anti-drug czar Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo until enough evidence was amassed to show that he had collaborated with drug traffickers for years, Foreign Minister Jose Angel Gurria conceded Friday. "If we had suggested something was afoot," then found the suspicions unfounded, Gurria told a news conference in Washington, "then we would have impaired and compromised our chief law enforcers."
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NEWS
February 21, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after he met his tough new Mexican counterpart here last December, President Clinton's top counter-narcotics official, Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, offered effusive praise. "This is a deadly serious guy," McCaffrey, himself a retired four-star general, said of the Mexican army general who had just taken over all federal drug enforcement here. Gen. Jose de Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, McCaffrey told several U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after he met his tough new Mexican counterpart here last December, President Clinton's top counter-narcotics official, Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, offered effusive praise. "This is a deadly serious guy," McCaffrey, himself a retired four-star general, said of the Mexican army general who had just taken over all federal drug enforcement here. Gen. Jose de Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo, McCaffrey told several U.S.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The army general who served as Mexico's anti-narcotics czar was jailed Wednesday on drug corruption charges, even as President Ernesto Zedillo launched a damage-control effort in the shellshocked armed forces, seeking to boost their image and preserve their expanding role in the U.S.-Mexican war on the multibillion-dollar narcotics trade. Zedillo, using an Army Day celebration as the stage, told thousands of officers and soldiers that the arrest of Gen.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's top counter-narcotics official was fired Tuesday after just 11 weeks on the job and accused of collaborating with the nation's top drug-trafficking cartel, striking a major blow to Mexico's promised crackdown on the multibillion-dollar cross-border drug trade. Career army Gen.
NEWS
February 22, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Mexican government told the United States nothing of its suspicions about Mexico's anti-drug czar Jesus Gutierrez Rebollo until enough evidence was amassed to show that he had collaborated with drug traffickers for years, Foreign Minister Jose Angel Gurria conceded Friday. "If we had suggested something was afoot," then found the suspicions unfounded, Gurria told a news conference in Washington, "then we would have impaired and compromised our chief law enforcers."
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Two federal agents who disappeared while tracking Mexico's most-wanted suspected cocaine baron have turned up dead in the trunk of a stolen car, authorities said Sunday. As Mexican law enforcement turns up the heat on alleged drug kingpins such as Amado Carrillo Fuentes, the drug traffickers are fighting back. And the list of slain Mexican drug agents is growing.
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican federal police and army agents seized three Lear jets, thousands of dollars in cash and more than two dozen suspected drug traffickers--including uniformed police officers--in a major blow to Mexico's most powerful drug cartel, authorities said Monday. The Mexican attorney general's office said it linked the jets and the 25 detained pilots, passengers and police officers--some of whom are federal agents--to the Juarez drug-trafficking cartel.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private jet appeared as a blip on military radar moments before it crash-landed in the mountains near Guadalajara in June 1995. But that radar speck started one of the most successful Mexican military operations in the war on powerful drug mafias that supply up to three-fourths of the cocaine sold in the United States. Gen.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The army general who served as Mexico's anti-narcotics czar was jailed Wednesday on drug corruption charges, even as President Ernesto Zedillo launched a damage-control effort in the shellshocked armed forces, seeking to boost their image and preserve their expanding role in the U.S.-Mexican war on the multibillion-dollar narcotics trade. Zedillo, using an Army Day celebration as the stage, told thousands of officers and soldiers that the arrest of Gen.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's top counter-narcotics official was fired Tuesday after just 11 weeks on the job and accused of collaborating with the nation's top drug-trafficking cartel, striking a major blow to Mexico's promised crackdown on the multibillion-dollar cross-border drug trade. Career army Gen.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Senate confirmed his nomination Tuesday over opposition protests, Mexico's new attorney general and his boss were cleaning house: replacing top law enforcement personnel with an unlikely mix of human rights and military officials to lead an intensified crackdown on drug trafficking and police corruption.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top U.S. and Mexican counter-narcotics officials agreed Wednesday to expand intelligence-sharing, joint operations and the delivery of sophisticated American high technology in the battle against the multibillion-dollar cross-border drug trade. They made their decisions at a two-day session led by Mexican Foreign Secretary Jose Angel Gurria Trevino and Clinton administration anti-drug czar Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the six months since President Ernesto Zedillo appointed a tough army general to crack down on corruption and incompetence in Mexico City's civilian police force, crime actually increased 10% over the record levels of the same period last year, official statistics show. And although the murder rate was down 13.8%, violent crime overall was up 8.
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