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January 19, 1988 | JULIA PRESTON, The Washington Post
Strongman Manuel A. Noriega is facing unprecedented political isolation in Panama after a stormy break this month with one of his oldest and closest advisers, according to Panamanian and American participants in the events. The firing Thursday of the Panamanian consul general in New York, Jose I. Blandon, brought to light a three-month, behind-the-scenes effort by Blandon to negotiate a political settlement involving Gen. Noriega, the Panamanian opposition and the United States.
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NEWS
December 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Manuel A. Noriega's taped prison conversations were apparently leaked to CNN by a person assisting the Drug Enforcement Administration, a federal source said. The Miami Herald on Saturday identified the source of the leak as Jose I. Blandon, a longtime political opponent of the former Panamanian leader and a potential witness against him. The FBI is trying to determine who gave the tapes to the network, which aired some of them over the last month.
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NEWS
December 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Manuel A. Noriega's taped prison conversations were apparently leaked to CNN by a person assisting the Drug Enforcement Administration, a federal source said. The Miami Herald on Saturday identified the source of the leak as Jose I. Blandon, a longtime political opponent of the former Panamanian leader and a potential witness against him. The FBI is trying to determine who gave the tapes to the network, which aired some of them over the last month.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Manuel A. Noriega are privately encouraging a move by five of his co-defendants to obtain a separate, earlier trial on grounds that they should not suffer from the adverse publicity that has surrounded the deposed Panamanian dictator.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Graphic details of Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega's alleged participation in drug deals and money laundering have been obtained by congressional investigators from a major American marijuana trafficker, who described delivering $300,000 in a briefcase to Noriega. The permanent investigations subcommittee of the Senate Government Operations Committee will hear testimony today from Steven Michael Kalish, a principal witness in an investigation by the U.S. Customs Service in Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega heads "an evil empire, one that moves faster than the United States" and that nets millions of dollars each year from domestic graft, international drug running and arms smuggling to leftist guerrillas, his one-time adviser told a Senate panel Tuesday. In sometimes impassioned testimony, Jose I.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for Manuel A. Noriega are privately encouraging a move by five of his co-defendants to obtain a separate, earlier trial on grounds that they should not suffer from the adverse publicity that has surrounded the deposed Panamanian dictator.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Concern among high-ranking officers in Panama's army that their chief, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, was abandoning them to legal prosecution and the wrath of a disgusted populace helped sink a 4-month, U.S.-backed effort to ease Noriega out of office, Panamanian and U.S. sources say. Agitation within Noriega's officer corps also forced Noriega to cut short a vacation visit to the Dominican Republic on Jan.
NEWS
February 28, 1988
Cuban President Fidel Castro, in an interview to be broadcast today, emphatically denied any links to alleged drug trafficking by Panama's military strongman Manuel A. Noriega. "It's absurd, it's a complete lie," he told NBC News in an interview taped last week. Castro was responding to charges made at a U.S. Senate hearing earlier this month by former Noriega aide Jose I. Blandon.
NEWS
September 23, 1988
Officials of Vice President George Bush's presidential campaign on Thursday denied allegations, contained in a British television documentary, that Bush knew of a drug money-laundering operation run by Panamanian strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega when he met with Noriega in 1983. Bush has said that he met with Panamanian officials, including then-President Ricardo de la Espriella and Noriega, during a refueling stop in Panama. In the documentary, two former aides to Noriega, Col.
NEWS
February 11, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Concern among high-ranking officers in Panama's army that their chief, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, was abandoning them to legal prosecution and the wrath of a disgusted populace helped sink a 4-month, U.S.-backed effort to ease Noriega out of office, Panamanian and U.S. sources say. Agitation within Noriega's officer corps also forced Noriega to cut short a vacation visit to the Dominican Republic on Jan.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega heads "an evil empire, one that moves faster than the United States" and that nets millions of dollars each year from domestic graft, international drug running and arms smuggling to leftist guerrillas, his one-time adviser told a Senate panel Tuesday. In sometimes impassioned testimony, Jose I.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Graphic details of Panama strongman Manuel A. Noriega's alleged participation in drug deals and money laundering have been obtained by congressional investigators from a major American marijuana trafficker, who described delivering $300,000 in a briefcase to Noriega. The permanent investigations subcommittee of the Senate Government Operations Committee will hear testimony today from Steven Michael Kalish, a principal witness in an investigation by the U.S. Customs Service in Tampa, Fla.
NEWS
January 19, 1988 | JULIA PRESTON, The Washington Post
Strongman Manuel A. Noriega is facing unprecedented political isolation in Panama after a stormy break this month with one of his oldest and closest advisers, according to Panamanian and American participants in the events. The firing Thursday of the Panamanian consul general in New York, Jose I. Blandon, brought to light a three-month, behind-the-scenes effort by Blandon to negotiate a political settlement involving Gen. Noriega, the Panamanian opposition and the United States.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Nicaraguan rebel officials confirmed Saturday that Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega arranged the training of Contras in Panama at the request of Reagan Administration officials during the period when Congress prohibited U.S. military aid to the rebels. A former aide to Gen. Noriega, Jose I. Blandon, has said the training program was set up in 1985 at the request of then-White House aide Lt. Col. Oliver L.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Eric Arturo Delvalle today proclaimed he is still Panama's president, hours after the legislature voted to oust him for trying to fire the nation's military chief and de facto ruler, Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. Delvalle called the move "legally despicable" and told reporters, "I am the president of Panama this morning." In a 10-minute session after midnight 38 legislators in the National Assembly voted Delvalle out of office and accused him of promoting U.S.
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