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Jose Ignacio Lopez

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BUSINESS
November 9, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
German prosecutors are expected to indict Volkswagen purchasing chief Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua this month as they conclude their three-year probe of alleged industrial espionage, Lopez's attorney said. Frankfurt attorney Juergen Taschke said in a statement that he "expects an indictment" later in November. Prosecutors in Frankfurt said the investigation of charges filed by General Motors Corp. regarding Lopez's switch to VW in 1993 will be concluded by year-end.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jose Ignacio Lopez, a former top General Motors executive in Europe who was involved in one of the auto industry's biggest industrial espionage cases, was ordered Monday to pay $225,000 to charity in exchange for dropping criminal charges against him. The state court in Darmstadt also levied smaller fines totaling $105,000 against three of Lopez's former GM colleagues to settle the case.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jose Ignacio Lopez, a former top General Motors executive in Europe who was involved in one of the auto industry's biggest industrial espionage cases, was ordered Monday to pay $225,000 to charity in exchange for dropping criminal charges against him. The state court in Darmstadt also levied smaller fines totaling $105,000 against three of Lopez's former GM colleagues to settle the case.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Volkswagen and General Motors Corp. reached an out-of-court settlement of their bitter, high-stakes civil dispute Thursday, abruptly defusing one of the most sensational cases of alleged industrial espionage in recent memory. Until now, observers had been warning that if things reached a worst-case scenario for Volkswagen--if the colorful case went to trial, and GM prevailed--the big German auto maker's financial damages could run well into the billions of dollars.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent move toward settling one of the most celebrated claims of industrial espionage in decades, German automotive giant Volkswagen said Friday that it has accepted the resignation of its controversial purchasing chief, Jose Ignacio Lopez.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A German state prosecutor said Friday that despite a 3 1/2-year investigation, he has found "no sufficient clues" of an industrial espionage conspiracy between senior managers at Volkswagen and its former purchasing chief, Jose Ignacio Lopez. But, as expected, Gerhard Andres, the senior public prosecutor for the state of Hessen, confirmed that he has indicted Lopez and three of his former Volkswagen colleagues on charges of embezzlement and misappropriation of trade secrets.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Volkswagen and General Motors Corp. reached an out-of-court settlement of their bitter, high-stakes civil dispute Thursday, abruptly defusing one of the most sensational cases of alleged industrial espionage in recent memory. Until now, observers had been warning that if things reached a worst-case scenario for Volkswagen--if the colorful case went to trial, and GM prevailed--the big German auto maker's financial damages could run well into the billions of dollars.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua, the eccentric automotive purchasing chief and self-proclaimed corporate warrior who made a religion out of cost-cutting, fell on his sword Friday. The resignation of Lopez, 55, from the top ranks of Volkswagen came amid the swirl of international corporate scandal and made his fall as dramatic as his unlikely meteoric rise.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
How Volkswagen Lured Lopez: The idea of becoming a director at Volkswagen and seeing a new plant built in his Basque homeland apparently lured Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriotua away from his cost-cutting mission at General Motors. Volkswagen made official what had been rumored for more than a month, that Lopez, 52, would join Europe's largest auto maker and be voted to a board seat. Lopez resigned Thursday from GM, where he had worked since 1979.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
VW's Lopez Files Statement With German Prosecutors: Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua filed the report with the prosecutors investigating whether he illegally took secret documents when he quit General Motors Corp. in March. The state prosecutor's office in Darmstadt said Lopez filed the report Friday, the same day Volkswagen's supervisory board admitted that former GM employees possessed sensitive documents after defecting to VW with Lopez.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A German state prosecutor said Friday that despite a 3 1/2-year investigation, he has found "no sufficient clues" of an industrial espionage conspiracy between senior managers at Volkswagen and its former purchasing chief, Jose Ignacio Lopez. But, as expected, Gerhard Andres, the senior public prosecutor for the state of Hessen, confirmed that he has indicted Lopez and three of his former Volkswagen colleagues on charges of embezzlement and misappropriation of trade secrets.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent move toward settling one of the most celebrated claims of industrial espionage in decades, German automotive giant Volkswagen said Friday that it has accepted the resignation of its controversial purchasing chief, Jose Ignacio Lopez.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1996 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua, the eccentric automotive purchasing chief and self-proclaimed corporate warrior who made a religion out of cost-cutting, fell on his sword Friday. The resignation of Lopez, 55, from the top ranks of Volkswagen came amid the swirl of international corporate scandal and made his fall as dramatic as his unlikely meteoric rise.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
German prosecutors are expected to indict Volkswagen purchasing chief Jose Ignacio Lopez de Arriortua this month as they conclude their three-year probe of alleged industrial espionage, Lopez's attorney said. Frankfurt attorney Juergen Taschke said in a statement that he "expects an indictment" later in November. Prosecutors in Frankfurt said the investigation of charges filed by General Motors Corp. regarding Lopez's switch to VW in 1993 will be concluded by year-end.
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