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Jose Luis Cuevas

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January 5, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jose Luis Cuevas is prone to exaggeration. In fact, he's a slave to its power to catch a jaded eye, drill home a point and fix a viewer's attention. In his drawings, a large selection of which goes on view today at the Tasende Gallery (820 Prospect St., through March 2), he makes knotted, lumpy figures with expressions as freakish as they are frank. In his writings, he dwells on the extreme, the theatrical, relishing the crudest of impressions and showing only contempt for the refined.
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January 5, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jose Luis Cuevas is prone to exaggeration. In fact, he's a slave to its power to catch a jaded eye, drill home a point and fix a viewer's attention. In his drawings, a large selection of which goes on view today at the Tasende Gallery (820 Prospect St., through March 2), he makes knotted, lumpy figures with expressions as freakish as they are frank. In his writings, he dwells on the extreme, the theatrical, relishing the crudest of impressions and showing only contempt for the refined.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Televisa, Mexico's leading television network, has yanked a series of controversial ads in which a group of leading Mexican artists and intellectuals demand the government do something about Mexico City's severe air pollution. The health risks were publicized for more than three weeks in one-minute spots aired on Televisa and delivered by such eminent artists and writers as painter Jose Luis Cuevas and novelist Carlos Fuentes.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
SHAPERO: "Symphony for Classical Orchestra"; "Nine-Minute Overture." Andre Previn conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. New World Records NW 373-2 (compact disc). Previn created a stir with the 1947 symphony when he revived it here in December, 1986. He then reprogrammed the work for the following season and took it on tour. Enthusiasm for the classically informed, stunningly scored and spirited work was certainly justified. It is a conservative's delight, firmly tonal and traditionally shaped, yet still remarkably fresh.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Mexican artist Jose Luis Cuevas is at work in a studio at Pasadena City College as about 50 students, a couple of photographers and a television crew watch and record. Straight-backed, intense, his dancing blue eyes seeing nothing but the picture taking shape, Cuevas draws a pair of large male heads. Like most of Cuevas' work, there is only a passing resemblance to observable reality. The heads seem to take on the qualities of masks, heavy browed and snout-nosed. One displays a long seam with cross-hatching, like a sutured scar, the other seems to sprout another face from his ear. Distinctive Signature Cuevas, surpassed only by 89-year-old Rufino Tamayo as Mexico's most widely acclaimed living artist, dabs with ink-soaked cotton, slashes with brush and grease pencil, then applies the distinctive Cuevas signature.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
SHAPERO: "Symphony for Classical Orchestra"; "Nine-Minute Overture." Andre Previn conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. New World Records NW 373-2 (compact disc). Previn created a stir with the 1947 symphony when he revived it here in December, 1986. He then reprogrammed the work for the following season and took it on tour. Enthusiasm for the classically informed, stunningly scored and spirited work was certainly justified. It is a conservative's delight, firmly tonal and traditionally shaped, yet still remarkably fresh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | Andrew Wainer, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 15
The Fine Arts Gallery at Golden West College is presenting "Imagenes de Mexico," an exhibit featuring modern Mexican artists, through March 3. Artists include Rafael Coronel, Jose Luis Cuevas, Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siquieros, Rufino Tamayo and Francisco Zuniga. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Wednesday, the gallery is also open 6 to 9 p.m. Admission is free. The Fine Arts Gallery is at Golden West College, 15744 Goldenwest St. Information: (714): 895-8356.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
BILLED as "the most important Latin American art auction ever held on the West Coast," a fundraiser for the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach next weekend will offer 182 works donated by artists, collectors and galleries. Oil paintings, sculptures, graphics, photography and works on paper by 153 artists -- including widely recognized masters such as Fernando Botero, Rafael Coronel and Jose Luis Cuevas -- will go on the block.
SPORTS
July 13, 1986 | STEVEN FLEISCHMAN
Despite controlling the ball for most of the game, the Hollywood Kickers settled for a 0-0 tie with the San Diego Nomads for the second time this season in a Western Soccer Alliance match Saturday at Birmingham High. The Kickers were unable to capitalize on a 23-6 advantage in shots on goal, and their closest brush with an offense came when a San Diego defender almost headed the ball into his own goal 28 minutes into the match.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2002 | From Associated Press
As many as 11 badly decomposed bodies, possibly belonging to immigrants who were being smuggled into the country, were found in a Union Pacific rail car parked at a grain elevator outside of town, authorities said Monday. All the victims boarded the train in Mexico, but their nationality was unconfirmed, said Jerry Heinauer, district director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service for Nebraska and Iowa.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Mexican artist Jose Luis Cuevas is at work in a studio at Pasadena City College as about 50 students, a couple of photographers and a television crew watch and record. Straight-backed, intense, his dancing blue eyes seeing nothing but the picture taking shape, Cuevas draws a pair of large male heads. Like most of Cuevas' work, there is only a passing resemblance to observable reality. The heads seem to take on the qualities of masks, heavy browed and snout-nosed. One displays a long seam with cross-hatching, like a sutured scar, the other seems to sprout another face from his ear. Distinctive Signature Cuevas, surpassed only by 89-year-old Rufino Tamayo as Mexico's most widely acclaimed living artist, dabs with ink-soaked cotton, slashes with brush and grease pencil, then applies the distinctive Cuevas signature.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Televisa, Mexico's leading television network, has yanked a series of controversial ads in which a group of leading Mexican artists and intellectuals demand the government do something about Mexico City's severe air pollution. The health risks were publicized for more than three weeks in one-minute spots aired on Televisa and delivered by such eminent artists and writers as painter Jose Luis Cuevas and novelist Carlos Fuentes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lala Aguilar Sims, an art historian from Mexico City, loved the fact that the Los Angeles County Museum of Art planned to present a huge Mexican art retrospective. But she didn't think that the museum show, "Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries," went far enough. "They stopped in the '50s with Frida Kahlo," said Sims, who now lives in Los Angeles. "I wanted to show the more modern artists, the ones working now, and the influences on them from the past."
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