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Jose Luis Razo

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June 10, 1989
Jose Luis Razo, a former football star at Anaheim Servite High Club, a Boys Club boy of the year and former Harvard University scholarship student, was convicted in Santa Ana of committing six ski-mask armed robberies while on his college vacations. Razo, 22, was convicted by an Orange County Superior Court jury that rejected his claims he had confessed to the crimes in a state of PCP-induced schizophrenia. Razo, who displayed no obvious emotion as the verdict was read, was charged with a string of 10 armed robberies between December 1985 and June 1987.
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NEWS
August 26, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
A former Harvard student from La Habra convicted of committing a series of armed robberies in Orange County during vacation breaks from his studies was sentenced Friday to serve 10 years and four months in prison. Jose Luis Razo Jr., convicted in Santa Ana in June of six robberies and an attempted escape from police, had been a star athlete and scholar at Servite High School in Anaheim and received scholarship offers from several colleges.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1987
Unlike Ollie North, Jose Luis Razo will not be looked upon as an all-American hero. However, Razo is a very good example of how peer pressure can turn a good person around. From the picture in the newspaper, he looks like a very handsome young man. Being graduated from a Catholic educational institution and attending college shows he had good brains. He was even an agile athlete. His "friends," the homeboys, probably had none of the aforementioned qualities. There is where peer pressure comes in under the cloak of jealousy.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Jose Luis Razo, who left a La Habra barrio to become a scholar and athlete at Harvard College, was found guilty Friday of six armed robberies almost two years after he shocked his family and friends by confessing to the crimes. An Orange County Superior Court jury acquitted Razo of four other robberies but also convicted him of trying to escape from police officers after his arrest in July, 1987. The case attracted national attention in 1987 because of its hard-to-answer questions: Why would a young man who had battled the ethnic odds and seemed to have such a bright future suddenly become, in the words of his former attorney, "a con . . . an inmate, just another Mexican armed robber?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1987 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The preliminary hearing for a Harvard University student from La Habra who is charged with 14 armed robberies bogged down Thursday when a witness changed his testimony regarding a summary he wrote of one of the crimes. Deputy Public Defender James S. Egar, representing Jose Luis Razo, questioned the witness for nearly an hour about a report he said he filled out following the robbery in July, 1986, of the Taco Bell restaurant in La Habra where he worked. Both Egar and Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys called their last witnesses in the robbery trial of former Harvard student Jose Luis Razo on Thursday, capping a week of testimony in which a state parole officer contradicted Razo's claim that a neighborhood friend actually committed all of the crimes. Razo, 22, emigrated with his parents from Mexico to La Habra while still a young boy and became a symbol of academic and athletic success at Servite High School in Anaheim, where he was a football standout. He received thousands of dollars in aid from Harvard, and had just completed his second year at the prestigious college when he confessed to police in July, 1987, that, on more than a dozen occasions, he had donned a ski mask, grabbed a gun and robbed stores and restaurants in Orange and Los Angeles counties during school breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
An attorney for Jose Luis Razo, the former Harvard University student who confessed to a string of armed robberies, charged Thursday that La Habra police officers delayed his arraignment in July of 1987 so that he would keep talking to authorities before he obtained a lawyer. "They intentionally delayed it to get him to speak," said John D. Barnett, Razo's court-appointed attorney, on the second day of pretrial motions in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana. The motions are expected to continue through next week, with jury selection tentatively scheduled for May 1. Razo, now 22, emerged from a modest La Habra neighborhood to become a standout athlete and student at Servite High School in Anaheim and a recognized youth leader in the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ and STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writers
When Jose Luis Razo confessed to a series of robberies two years ago, he gave details of the crimes to La Habra police that only the perpetrator or victims could have known, prosecutor Ravi Mehta said Thursday. "The evidence will show that Razo committed those robberies," Mehta said in his opening statement in Superior Court in Santa Ana. "No one put a lamp over his head . . . or hit him with a rubber hose." The former Harvard University student's trial got under way Thursday with Razo's court-appointed attorney, John D. Barnett, declining to give an opening statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The 10 holdups that former Harvard student Jose Luis Razo is accused of were committed by two or three different robbers, one of whom may be Razo's younger brother, the defendant's attorney said Monday during closing arguments of his trial. Razo, 22, told police and newspaper reporters in 1987 that he committed the string of armed robberies of stores and fast-food restaurants during breaks from his studies at Harvard. But during his monthlong trial in Superior Court in Santa Ana, Razo has testified that Richard Longoria, a neighborhood friend with an extensive criminal record, actually committed the crimes and then told him the details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
The Harvard University sophomore suspected of committing a string of armed robberies in Los Angeles and Orange counties over the last two years described himself in a Friday interview as "very confused" and torn between a rarefied academic life and the streets of his lower-middle-class neighborhood in La Habra. "I needed the money, man, and that was a way to get it," said Jose Luis Razo Jr. at the Orange County Jail. "I did 15 robberies, averaged $2,000 each, and I gave most of the money away."
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
Jose Luis Razo, a former football star at Anaheim Servite High Club, a Boys Club boy of the year and former Harvard University scholarship student, was convicted in Santa Ana of committing six ski-mask armed robberies while on his college vacations. Razo, 22, was convicted by an Orange County Superior Court jury that rejected his claims he had confessed to the crimes in a state of PCP-induced schizophrenia. Razo, who displayed no obvious emotion as the verdict was read, was charged with a string of 10 armed robberies between December 1985 and June 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The 10 holdups that former Harvard student Jose Luis Razo is accused of were committed by two or three different robbers, one of whom may be Razo's younger brother, the defendant's attorney said Monday during closing arguments of his trial. Razo, 22, told police and newspaper reporters in 1987 that he committed the string of armed robberies of stores and fast-food restaurants during breaks from his studies at Harvard. But during his monthlong trial in Superior Court in Santa Ana, Razo has testified that Richard Longoria, a neighborhood friend with an extensive criminal record, actually committed the crimes and then told him the details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Attorneys called their last witnesses in the robbery trial of former Harvard student Jose Luis Razo on Thursday, capping a week of testimony in which a state parole officer contradicted Razo's claim that a neighborhood friend actually committed all of the crimes. Razo, 22, emigrated with his parents from Mexico to La Habra while still a young boy and became a symbol of academic and athletic success at Servite High School in Anaheim, where he was a football standout. He received thousands of dollars in aid from Harvard, and had just completed his second year at the prestigious college when he confessed to police in July, 1987, that, on more than a dozen occasions, he had donned a ski mask, grabbed a gun and robbed stores and restaurants in Orange and Los Angeles counties during school breaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ and STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writers
When Jose Luis Razo confessed to a series of robberies two years ago, he gave details of the crimes to La Habra police that only the perpetrator or victims could have known, prosecutor Ravi Mehta said Thursday. "The evidence will show that Razo committed those robberies," Mehta said in his opening statement in Superior Court in Santa Ana. "No one put a lamp over his head . . . or hit him with a rubber hose." The former Harvard University student's trial got under way Thursday with Razo's court-appointed attorney, John D. Barnett, declining to give an opening statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
An attorney for Jose Luis Razo, the former Harvard University student who confessed to a string of armed robberies, charged Thursday that La Habra police officers delayed his arraignment in July of 1987 so that he would keep talking to authorities before he obtained a lawyer. "They intentionally delayed it to get him to speak," said John D. Barnett, Razo's court-appointed attorney, on the second day of pretrial motions in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana. The motions are expected to continue through next week, with jury selection tentatively scheduled for May 1. Razo, now 22, emerged from a modest La Habra neighborhood to become a standout athlete and student at Servite High School in Anaheim and a recognized youth leader in the community.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
It has been more than three years since Jose Luis Razo crouched in a trash bin outside a La Habra dairy and made a decision that changed the course of his life. The Harvard University freshman had just returned home from Cambridge to spend the holidays with his family. Now, the day after Christmas, he hid behind the Driftwood Dairy, down the street from the Catholic church where, as a precocious grammar school pupil, he first demonstrated the academic and athletic abilities that would take him out of the barrio.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
A former Harvard student from La Habra convicted of committing a series of armed robberies in Orange County during vacation breaks from his studies was sentenced Friday to serve 10 years and four months in prison. Jose Luis Razo Jr., convicted in Santa Ana in June of six robberies and an attempted escape from police, had been a star athlete and scholar at Servite High School in Anaheim and received scholarship offers from several colleges.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Jose Luis Razo, who left a La Habra barrio to become a scholar and athlete at Harvard College, was found guilty Friday of six armed robberies almost two years after he shocked his family and friends by confessing to the crimes. An Orange County Superior Court jury acquitted Razo of four other robberies but also convicted him of trying to escape from police officers after his arrest in July, 1987. The case attracted national attention in 1987 because of its hard-to-answer questions: Why would a young man who had battled the ethnic odds and seemed to have such a bright future suddenly become, in the words of his former attorney, "a con . . . an inmate, just another Mexican armed robber?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1987 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The preliminary hearing for a Harvard University student from La Habra who is charged with 14 armed robberies bogged down Thursday when a witness changed his testimony regarding a summary he wrote of one of the crimes. Deputy Public Defender James S. Egar, representing Jose Luis Razo, questioned the witness for nearly an hour about a report he said he filled out following the robbery in July, 1986, of the Taco Bell restaurant in La Habra where he worked. Both Egar and Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1987
Unlike Ollie North, Jose Luis Razo will not be looked upon as an all-American hero. However, Razo is a very good example of how peer pressure can turn a good person around. From the picture in the newspaper, he looks like a very handsome young man. Being graduated from a Catholic educational institution and attending college shows he had good brains. He was even an agile athlete. His "friends," the homeboys, probably had none of the aforementioned qualities. There is where peer pressure comes in under the cloak of jealousy.
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