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Jose Mauricio Angulo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1989 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Twelve protesters demanding the ouster of El Salvador's new consul general in Los Angeles were arrested Monday after they refused a police order to clear the Salvadoran consulate's lobby. The 12 were among an estimated 100 demonstrators who descended on the consulate just west of Civic Center to protest the naming of Jose Mauricio Angulo--on his first day on the job--as El Salvador's representative.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1989 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Twelve protesters demanding the ouster of El Salvador's new consul general in Los Angeles were arrested Monday after they refused a police order to clear the Salvadoran consulate's lobby. The 12 were among an estimated 100 demonstrators who descended on the consulate just west of Civic Center to protest the naming of Jose Mauricio Angulo--on his first day on the job--as El Salvador's representative.
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NEWS
November 22, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the civil war in El Salvador took a dramatic twist Tuesday, opponents of the Central American nation's government stepped up their activity in Los Angeles. Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy, during a news conference with actor Ed Asner and a coalition of labor leaders and clergy, called for a boycott of Salvadoran coffee and a suspension of all U.S. aid to the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of Salvadoran refugee groups called Thursday for a boycott of a Los Angeles-based international overnight delivery firm owned by Carlos Rene Mata, a businessman named by Los Angeles police as a suspect in "death squad" threats against Salvadoran refugees living in Southern California. Mata's business, Pipil Express, has 80 offices in El Salvador, Guatemala and California, including six in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The real battles are being fought with AK-47s and helicopter gunships in the mountain jungles of El Salvador and the working-class suburbs of its capital city. But with anywhere from 350,000 to 500,000 Salvadorans living in Southern California, some skirmishes from El Salvador's intensified civil war have inevitably spilled over into the Central American barrios of Pico-Union and Westlake.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 12 years, the civil war in El Salvador echoed loudly in Los Angeles and transformed the city. Tens of thousands of Salvadorans took up residence in the Los Angeles area during the last decade, converting a tiny refugee enclave into a huge, thriving community. From pupusas to political activism, Salvadoran influence became known in wide circles, often mirroring here the conflict at home.
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