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Jose Napolean Duarte

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NEWS
February 5, 1988
President Jose Napoleon Duarte must decide if three men charged in the killings of four U.S. Marines and two other Americans at a cafe in San Salvador in 1985 should be freed under an amnesty, the country's highest military court ruled. Rene Valdivieso, secretary of the three-member court, said the panel has rejected the government's appeal of a decision that would free the men and had sent the case to Duarte.
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NEWS
December 3, 1988 | From Reuters
President Jose Napoleon Duarte of El Salvador, who is suffering from terminal cancer, was taken to a hospital here late Thursday with an intestinal infection, but his condition has improved and he is due to be released today, Salvadoran Foreign Minister Ricardo Acevedo Peralta said Friday. "He is well; he overcame an infection that was detected," Acevedo said. "He does not have a temperature now, and they gave him antibiotics."
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NEWS
December 3, 1988 | From Reuters
President Jose Napoleon Duarte of El Salvador, who is suffering from terminal cancer, was taken to a hospital here late Thursday with an intestinal infection, but his condition has improved and he is due to be released today, Salvadoran Foreign Minister Ricardo Acevedo Peralta said Friday. "He is well; he overcame an infection that was detected," Acevedo said. "He does not have a temperature now, and they gave him antibiotics."
NEWS
February 5, 1988
President Jose Napoleon Duarte must decide if three men charged in the killings of four U.S. Marines and two other Americans at a cafe in San Salvador in 1985 should be freed under an amnesty, the country's highest military court ruled. Rene Valdivieso, secretary of the three-member court, said the panel has rejected the government's appeal of a decision that would free the men and had sent the case to Duarte.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has quietly shelved a plea by El Salvador's President Jose Napoleon Duarte for temporary refuge in the United States for as many as 500,000 Salvadorans who are living illegally in this country, according to Administration officials. The officials said that Duarte's request has not been rejected formally and may never be. Nevertheless, they said, there is virtually no chance it ever will be approved.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Balaguer, a conservative historian and poet, was sworn in as president of this Caribbean island republic for the fifth time Saturday with a pledge to fight poverty and official corruption. Balaguer, who first served as president in the early 1960s by appointment of longtime Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo, accepted the presidential sash again just two weeks short of his 79th birthday, denouncing the Trujillo Era as "30 years of darkness." Trujillo was assassinated in 1961.
OPINION
March 27, 1988 | SUSAN KAUFMAN PURCELL, Susan Kaufman Purcell is director of the Latin American project at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.
The unexpected cease-fire agreement between the Sandinistas and the Contras could produce both peace and democracy in Nicaragua. It could also lead to the destruction of the Contras and the consolidation of Sandinista control. Given the balance of power between the two sides, an undemocratic outcome is more probable unless the United States explicitly links future economic assistance for Nicaragua and its neighbors to the implementation of democratic reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1986 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
A leading U.S. expert on the justice system in El Salvador says that "the rule of law has broken down" in the embattled Central American country and that "it is not possible at any level for human rights victims to look to the legal system for protection." The assessment came last week in the closing stages of a major class-action lawsuit in Los Angeles federal court accusing U.S. immigration officials of systematically denying Salvadoran refugees their rights to apply for political asylum.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration has quietly shelved a plea by El Salvador's President Jose Napoleon Duarte for temporary refuge in the United States for as many as 500,000 Salvadorans who are living illegally in this country, according to Administration officials. The officials said that Duarte's request has not been rejected formally and may never be. Nevertheless, they said, there is virtually no chance it ever will be approved.
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