Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJose P Balmaceda
IN THE NEWS

Jose P Balmaceda

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A committee of University of California regents this week will consider a proposal to stop paying the salaries of two doctors implicated in the UC Irvine fertility scandal, according to a confidential document. Ricardo H. Asch and Jose P. Balmaceda, accused by the university of stealing eggs and embryos from patients and giving them to others, would lose annual salaries of $95,800 and $63,700 respectively, according to the staff proposal. A third physician accused in the scandal, Sergio C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UC Irvine fertility doctor arrested last month in Argentina after eluding authorities for five years did not appear for a court hearing Friday following his release on $10,000 bail, raising concerns among federal prosecutors that he has fled once again. U.S. Justice Department officials said the whereabouts of Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, one of three doctors suspected in a fertility clinic scandal at UCI, is unknown and said they have asked Argentine authorities to search for him.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since his internationally acclaimed fertility practice at UC Irvine became entwined in suspicions of egg-stealing and record-hiding, Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda took the offensive Wednesday, denying any wrongdoing and seeking to restore a once-golden reputation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The UC Irvine fertility doctor who was arrested last month in Argentina after eluding authorities for five years did not appear for a court hearing Friday after his release on $10,000 bail, raising concerns among federal prosecutors that he has fled once again. U.S. Justice Department officials said the whereabouts of Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, one of three doctors suspected in a notorious fertility clinic scandal at UC Irvine, are unknown. They have asked Argentine authorities to search for him. U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities Monday said it may take a year to extradite from Argentina a fugitive Orange County doctor wanted for alleged crimes in connection with the 1994 UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal. Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, 53, who was captured Thursday after being spotted by customs officials at a Buenos Aires airport, is expected to fight extradition in an Argentine court proceeding aimed at determining whether the U.S. government has sufficient evidence against him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal broke, a UCI doctor offered a former employee what she thought was a bribe to keep quiet about what had gone on within clinic walls, the employee testified Wednesday. Toula Batshoun, a former office supervisor, testified that in late May or early June of last year--more than two years after she quit her job at the clinic--an attorney for Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda asked her in a meeting, "how deep are your wounds?"
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a dozen lawsuits and a criminal probe in the biggest ethical scandal to hit reproductive medicine, Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda sold his Corona del Mar home last summer and boarded a plane to his native Chile, calling the trip a visit to his ailing mother. But the besieged fertility expert--who escaped the Chilean military junta as an exile two decades ago--has come home. And despite his bruised U.S. reputation, his presence in this city of 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
Regarding the recent UCI cancer research controversy: A pattern is emerging which started with Drs. Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone [at UCI's now defunct fertility clinic]. UCI is willing to forge any revenue-producing relationship, as well as encourage its professional staff to forge these relationships, to enhance its own wealth and the personal wealth of its academicians and medical staff. Through the abuse of federal and state funds, taxpayers are funding the personal wealth of physicians and businessmen who form alliances in the name of "scientific research," only to promote their own wealth and the wealth of their shareholders.
NEWS
June 28, 1996
Two of the three physicians accused of stealing eggs and implanting them in unsuspecting women at UC Irvine's now-defunct fertility clinic were each indicted Thursday on 30 counts of federal mail fraud for allegedly submitting false claims to insurance companies. The indictments handed down by a federal grand jury accuse Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, 47, and Dr. Sergio C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state auditor has sued the three doctors embroiled in the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, accusing them of failing to comply with subpoenas for financial and other records needed in his investigation. Drs. Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone have refused to hand over personal income-tax returns, clinic billing records and monthly financial statements, and patient logs and personnel records, according to the suit filed Friday in Orange County Superior Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities Monday said it may take a year to extradite from Argentina a fugitive Orange County doctor wanted for alleged crimes in connection with the 1994 UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal. Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, 53, who was captured Thursday after being spotted by customs officials at a Buenos Aires airport, is expected to fight extradition in an Argentine court proceeding aimed at determining whether the U.S. government has sufficient evidence against him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities on Monday said it may take a year to extradite a fugitive Orange County doctor arrested in Argentina in connection with the 1994 UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal. Dr. Jose Balmaceda, 53, who was captured on Thursday after being spotted by customs officials at a Buenos Aires airport, is expected to fight extradition in an Argentine court proceeding to determine whether the U.S. government has sufficient evidence to warrant extradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2001 | JACK LEONARD and STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A doctor fleeing fraud charges stemming from the 1994 scandal at UC Irvine's now-defunct fertility clinic was captured this week as he tried to slip into Argentina, U.S. officials said Friday. Dr. Jose Balmaceda, 53, who had eluded federal agents monitoring his activities for more than two years, was arrested Thursday after customs officials at Buenos Aires Airport recognized him as a fugitive, authorities said.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | JACK LEONARD and STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A doctor fleeing fraud charges stemming from the 1994 scandal at UC Irvine's now-defunct fertility clinic was captured this week as he tried to slip into Argentina, U.S. officials said Friday. Dr. Jose P. Balmaceda, 53, who had eluded federal agents monitoring his activities for more than two years, was arrested Thursday after customs officials at Buenos Aires Airport recognized him as a fugitive, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to recoup millions of dollars spent on legal settlements, the UC Board of Regents voted Friday to sue the doctors who ran the scandal-ridden fertility clinic at UC Irvine. The regents want Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio Stone to reimburse them for more than $19 million the university has agreed to pay infertile couples who sought help at the now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to recoup millions of dollars spent on legal settlements, the UC Board of Regents voted Friday to sue the doctors who ran the scandal-ridden fertility clinic at UC Irvine. The regents want Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone to reimburse them for more than $19 million that the university has agreed to pay infertile couples who sought help at the once acclaimed but now defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996 | From Associated Press
Two more UC Irvine fertility clinic patients filed lawsuits alleging egg and embryo theft. Helen and Gregory Taylor and Paula and Jeffrey Richman filed their lawsuits in Orange County Superior Court on Friday, accusing the UCI regents and fertility surgeons Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio Stone of taking their eggs or embryos without permission. The couples also alleged negligence, fraud, intentional infliction of emotional distress and allowing evidence to be destroyed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1995
The attorney for a couple alleging that doctors at UC Irvine's fertility clinic gave their embryos to other couples without their permission said Saturday that he would be filing seven lawsuits against the university on behalf of couples making similar allegations. Theodore S. Wentworth said the allegations in the lawsuits would resemble those made in June by Debbie and John Challender of Newport Beach. In that suit, which names the university, the fertility center and doctors Ricardo H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
Regarding the recent UCI cancer research controversy: A pattern is emerging which started with Drs. Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone [at UCI's now defunct fertility clinic]. UCI is willing to forge any revenue-producing relationship, as well as encourage its professional staff to forge these relationships, to enhance its own wealth and the personal wealth of its academicians and medical staff. Through the abuse of federal and state funds, taxpayers are funding the personal wealth of physicians and businessmen who form alliances in the name of "scientific research," only to promote their own wealth and the wealth of their shareholders.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The three UC Irvine doctors who allegedly stole eggs harvested from women undergoing fertility treatments at four Southern California clinics owe the university $2.47 million, mostly from unreported revenue, according to a state auditor's investigation released Wednesday. The auditor found that the three once-acclaimed fertility experts, Ricardo Asch, Jose Balmaceda and Sergio Stone, failed to report $7.83 million in revenue from their partnership with the university.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|