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Jose Ramos Horta

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos de Abreu, the founder and president of the Hollywood Film Festival, which opens Thursday, was reviewing this year's submissions when his attention was drawn to an Australian documentary called "The Diplomat." There on the screen was exiled Portuguese freedom fighter Jose Ramos-Horta, who in 1996 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Roman Catholic Bishop Carlos Belo for their work on behalf of the oppressed people of East Timor.
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WORLD
May 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Jose Ramos-Horta took the presidential oath at a simple ceremony in Dili, the capital, as fresh violence erupted in the troubled country. Ramos-Horta succeeds Jose Alexandre Gusmao after winning nearly 70% of the votes in a May 9 runoff. He spent years abroad as a spokesman for East Timor's struggle for independence from Indonesia, a goal it achieved in 2002 after a 1999 referendum.
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WORLD
May 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Jose Ramos-Horta took the presidential oath at a simple ceremony in Dili, the capital, as fresh violence erupted in the troubled country. Ramos-Horta succeeds Jose Alexandre Gusmao after winning nearly 70% of the votes in a May 9 runoff. He spent years abroad as a spokesman for East Timor's struggle for independence from Indonesia, a goal it achieved in 2002 after a 1999 referendum.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos de Abreu, the founder and president of the Hollywood Film Festival, which opens Thursday, was reviewing this year's submissions when his attention was drawn to an Australian documentary called "The Diplomat." There on the screen was exiled Portuguese freedom fighter Jose Ramos-Horta, who in 1996 was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize along with Roman Catholic Bishop Carlos Belo for their work on behalf of the oppressed people of East Timor.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | From the Washington Post
After the Indonesian government dropped its long-standing ban against him, East Timorese independence leader Jose Ramos-Horta returned to Indonesia on Saturday for the first time in 24 years. Ramos-Horta arrived on an afternoon flight from Singapore and was immediately whisked to an airport hotel where he and another prominent independence leader, Jose Alexandre "Xanana" Gusmao, participated briefly in talks aimed at bringing peace to their troubled homeland.
OPINION
May 25, 1997 | Nancy Yoshihara, Nancy Yoshihara is an editorial writer for The Times
In 1975, Jose Ramos-Horta fled his beloved homeland, East Timor, when Indonesia invaded and annexed the small island between Java and Australia. Since then, he has worked tirelessly so the world will not forget East Timor under the closed and brutal rule of Indonesia.
WORLD
April 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Voters in East Timor lined up today to choose a new president, hoping the election would end bitter political rivalries and widespread poverty threatening Asia's youngest nation. With a runoff predicted, some people fear the fledgling democracy could be facing months of political instability. Prime Minister Jose Ramos-Horta, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, leads the race. Preliminary results are expected Wednesday.
WORLD
June 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
East Timor's defense minister met with a leader of rebel soldiers to discuss the country's security and political crisis, the ministry said. The announcement came after mobs set fire to houses and looted a warehouse, and President Jose Alexandre Gusmao tearfully pleaded with his countrymen to stop burning their capital. Defense Minister Jose Ramos-Horta met Alfredo Reinado, a former military police commander, at his camp in Maubisse, the ministry said.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia has started taking measures to improve security in West Timor province's squalid refugee camps and appears willing to discuss ways to clear them out entirely, senior U.N. and East Timorese officials said.
WORLD
May 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nobel Peace Prize winner Jose Ramos-Horta was headed for a landslide victory in East Timor's presidential elections, provisional results showed. "I will honor what I told the people in the campaign: I will work for the poor, with the entire country, to unite it, and heal its wounds," Ramos-Horta said. The 57-year-old prime minister had about 73% of the votes with almost 90% counted, election commission spokeswoman Maria Sarmento said.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | From the Washington Post
After the Indonesian government dropped its long-standing ban against him, East Timorese independence leader Jose Ramos-Horta returned to Indonesia on Saturday for the first time in 24 years. Ramos-Horta arrived on an afternoon flight from Singapore and was immediately whisked to an airport hotel where he and another prominent independence leader, Jose Alexandre "Xanana" Gusmao, participated briefly in talks aimed at bringing peace to their troubled homeland.
OPINION
May 25, 1997 | Nancy Yoshihara, Nancy Yoshihara is an editorial writer for The Times
In 1975, Jose Ramos-Horta fled his beloved homeland, East Timor, when Indonesia invaded and annexed the small island between Java and Australia. Since then, he has worked tirelessly so the world will not forget East Timor under the closed and brutal rule of Indonesia.
WORLD
March 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A former policeman suspected of wounding East Timor's president last month has surrendered to police, military officials said. Amaro da Costa turned himself in late Saturday, handing over two automatic weapons and some ammunition, Lt. Col. Filomeno Paixao said. President Jose Ramos- Horta is still recovering from the Feb. 11 shooting outside his home. Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao escaped unharmed from an ambush on his motorcade the same day. Da Costa told reporters that the suspect "was involved" but provided few other details.
WORLD
August 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
East Timor independence hero Xanana Gusmao was named prime minister, inciting violence a year after clashes between security forces drew the nation to the brink of civil war. The largest party, Fretilin, complained that it had been denied the right to form a government. Gangs of youths burned tires in the streets of Dili, the capital, and torched a tax office.
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