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NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports and
Jose Razo, the former Harvard University student charged with 10 armed robberies in Orange County, said this morning that a 26-year-old friend from La Habra actually committed the crimes. On Monday Razo, on trial in Orange County Superior Court, repeatedly refused to identify the man that he simply called "the robber." But under pressure from Judge Jean Rheinheimer, Razo this morning identified the man as a former La Habra High School student. But the prosecutor, Deputy Dist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1999
Re "Pit Bulls Maul Mother, 2 Others," May 10: A person should never try to separate a dog fight, not even the owner. A dog with the taste of blood can attack a person or anything else in sight. When people hear the name "pit bull," they fear it, but there is nothing to fear from a well-bred pit bull because it will never attack if the dog was brought up properly since it was a puppy. A pit bull is a nice and kind breed if brought up right. JOSE RAZO Santa Ana What thought process compels someone to purchase a dog that has a reputation for assaulting not just people, but other dogs, cats and anything else that they can get their jaws on?
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NEWS
May 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Jose Razo, the Harvard University student accused of a dozen armed robberies in 1987, told a hushed courtroom in Santa Ana this morning that he feigned confessions to the crimes because he was high on drugs and believed that he was Jesus Christ. Razo, 22, an honors student and athlete, became the first defense witness in his trial in Orange County Superior Court. His attorney, John Barnett, earlier told jurors that the defense would counter Razo's confessions by showing that he had been using the mind-altering drug PCP. The defense attorney also told jurors that Razo was fascinated with the criminal mind, which he had studied at college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to hear an appeal from convicted armed-robber Jose Luis Razo Jr., dealing another legal setback to the one-time Harvard University student/athlete. Razo, whose rise from a modest La Habra barrio made him a symbol of hope for youth in his community, had argued that two Latinos were unfairly excluded as jurors on racial grounds at his 1989 trial in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1999
Re "Pit Bulls Maul Mother, 2 Others," May 10: A person should never try to separate a dog fight, not even the owner. A dog with the taste of blood can attack a person or anything else in sight. When people hear the name "pit bull," they fear it, but there is nothing to fear from a well-bred pit bull because it will never attack if the dog was brought up properly since it was a puppy. A pit bull is a nice and kind breed if brought up right. JOSE RAZO Santa Ana What thought process compels someone to purchase a dog that has a reputation for assaulting not just people, but other dogs, cats and anything else that they can get their jaws on?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Former Harvard University student Jose Razo maintained Tuesday that a childhood friend was the real "ski mask bandit" who carried out a string of holdups that Razo is charged with committing while home in Orange County on school breaks. Razo's claim, which came as he took the stand for the second day at his trial in an attempt to repudiate an earlier confession, drew skepticism from the prosecutor, who said Razo was doing nothing more than "reaching out and naming a scapegoat." On Monday, Razo had testified that a friend from his hometown of La Habra, whom he refused to name, was the actual criminal whom police had dubbed the "ski mask bandit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
A Harvard University basketball player testified Wednesday that Jose Razo, his former roommate, was on the Cambridge, Mass., campus the day that one of the 10 Orange County holdups that Razo is accused of committing occurred. However, under cross-examination, Neil Patrick Phillips acknowledged that he could not be positive that Razo, the alleged Ski Mask Bandit, was at Harvard on Feb. 1, 1987. Phillips testified in Superior Court in Santa Ana that to "his best recollection," Razo was still in Massachusetts on the date in question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Former Harvard University student Jose Razo on Tuesday identified a childhood friend as the real Ski Mask Bandit accused of a string of holdups that Razo is charged with committing while home in Orange County on break. Razo's revelation, which came as he took the stand for the second day in an attempt to repudiate earlier confessions to the crimes, drew skepticism from the trial prosecutor, who said Razo was doing nothing more than "reaching out and naming a scapegoat." On Monday, Razo testified that a friend from his hometown of La Habra was the actual criminal, whom police had dubbed the Ski Mask Bandit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Jose Razo, who emerged from a modest La Habra neighborhood to win an academic scholarship at Harvard University, denied Monday that he was the Ski Mask Bandit and testified that he was high on drugs and thought he was God when he confessed to a string of holdups. Razo, 22, told Orange County Superior Court jurors in Santa Ana that the confessions he gave to both police and reporters in 1987 were based on the exploits of a real armed robber who had been a friend. He also testified that his Harvard studies intensified his interest in crime, but he refused to divulge the alleged real robber's name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989
A judge Wednesday threw out some of Jose Luis Razo's confessions to a series of armed robberies but said that she would allow the former Harvard College student's most damaging statements to be used as evidence in his trial next week. The ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Jean Rheinheimer ended a week of pretrial testimony in which Razo's attorney, John D. Barnett, attempted to suppress his client's 1987 confessions to 13 armed robberies in five cities. Deputy Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
A Harvard University basketball player testified Wednesday that Jose Razo, his former roommate, was on the Cambridge, Mass., campus the day that one of the 10 Orange County holdups that Razo is accused of committing occurred. However, under cross-examination, Neil Patrick Phillips acknowledged that he could not be positive that Razo, the alleged Ski Mask Bandit, was at Harvard on Feb. 1, 1987. Phillips testified in Superior Court in Santa Ana that to "his best recollection," Razo was still in Massachusetts on the date in question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Former Harvard University student Jose Razo maintained Tuesday that a childhood friend was the real "ski mask bandit" who carried out a string of holdups that Razo is charged with committing while home in Orange County on school breaks. Razo's claim, which came as he took the stand for the second day at his trial in an attempt to repudiate an earlier confession, drew skepticism from the prosecutor, who said Razo was doing nothing more than "reaching out and naming a scapegoat." On Monday, Razo had testified that a friend from his hometown of La Habra, whom he refused to name, was the actual criminal whom police had dubbed the "ski mask bandit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Former Harvard University student Jose Razo on Tuesday identified a childhood friend as the real Ski Mask Bandit accused of a string of holdups that Razo is charged with committing while home in Orange County on break. Razo's revelation, which came as he took the stand for the second day in an attempt to repudiate earlier confessions to the crimes, drew skepticism from the trial prosecutor, who said Razo was doing nothing more than "reaching out and naming a scapegoat." On Monday, Razo testified that a friend from his hometown of La Habra was the actual criminal, whom police had dubbed the Ski Mask Bandit.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports and
Jose Razo, the former Harvard University student charged with 10 armed robberies in Orange County, said this morning that a 26-year-old friend from La Habra actually committed the crimes. On Monday Razo, on trial in Orange County Superior Court, repeatedly refused to identify the man that he simply called "the robber." But under pressure from Judge Jean Rheinheimer, Razo this morning identified the man as a former La Habra High School student. But the prosecutor, Deputy Dist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Jose Razo, who emerged from a modest La Habra neighborhood to win an academic scholarship at Harvard University, denied Monday that he was the Ski Mask Bandit and testified that he was high on drugs and thought he was God when he confessed to a string of holdups. Razo, 22, told Orange County Superior Court jurors in Santa Ana that the confessions he gave to both police and reporters in 1987 were based on the exploits of a real armed robber who had been a friend. He also testified that his Harvard studies intensified his interest in crime, but he refused to divulge the alleged real robber's name.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Jose Razo, the Harvard University student accused of a dozen armed robberies in 1987, told a hushed courtroom in Santa Ana this morning that he feigned confessions to the crimes because he was high on drugs and believed that he was Jesus Christ. Razo, 22, an honors student and athlete, became the first defense witness in his trial in Orange County Superior Court. His attorney, John Barnett, earlier told jurors that the defense would counter Razo's confessions by showing that he had been using the mind-altering drug PCP. The defense attorney also told jurors that Razo was fascinated with the criminal mind, which he had studied at college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to hear an appeal from convicted armed-robber Jose Luis Razo Jr., dealing another legal setback to the one-time Harvard University student/athlete. Razo, whose rise from a modest La Habra barrio made him a symbol of hope for youth in his community, had argued that two Latinos were unfairly excluded as jurors on racial grounds at his 1989 trial in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
Jose Luis Razo, a former football star at Anaheim Servite High Club, a Boys Club boy of the year and former Harvard University scholarship student, was convicted in Santa Ana of committing six ski-mask armed robberies while on his college vacations. Razo, 22, was convicted by an Orange County Superior Court jury that rejected his claims he had confessed to the crimes in a state of PCP-induced schizophrenia. Razo, who displayed no obvious emotion as the verdict was read, was charged with a string of 10 armed robberies between December 1985 and June 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1989
A judge Wednesday threw out some of Jose Luis Razo's confessions to a series of armed robberies but said that she would allow the former Harvard College student's most damaging statements to be used as evidence in his trial next week. The ruling by Orange County Superior Court Judge Jean Rheinheimer ended a week of pretrial testimony in which Razo's attorney, John D. Barnett, attempted to suppress his client's 1987 confessions to 13 armed robberies in five cities. Deputy Dist.
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