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Jose Rivera

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Jose Rivera is out of the kitchen sink and into magical realism. That's the term the playwright uses to describe "The Promise," a modern-day tale of love, death--and love beyond it, which opened Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. An alternately serious and bubbly 32, Rivera became hooked on magical realism reading the work of South American writers, principally that of Gabriel Garcia Marquez ("One Hundred Years of Solitude").
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
The deal Jose Rivera, Oscar-nominated screenwriter ("The Motorcycle Diaries"), options Micheline Marcom's "Three Apples Fell From Heaven," a powerful novel about the Armenian genocide. The players Marcom is represented on literary rights by Sandra Dijkstra at the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency and on film rights by Liza Wachter at the Rabineau, Wachter, Sanford & Harris Literary Agency. Rivera is represented by United Talent Agency and Rick Berg of Code Entertainment. The novel was published by Riverhead Books.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Jose Rivera is out of the kitchen sink and into magical realism. That's the term the playwright uses to describe "The Promise," a modern-day tale of love, death--and love beyond it. Developed at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa last summer as part of the company's second annual Hispanic Playwrights Project, it opened Friday at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LA JOLLA--Two stories are vying for control of Jose Rivera's new play, "Adoration of the Old Woman." The story that takes up most of the time at La Jolla Playhouse examines the quandary facing Puerto Rico: Should it become the 51st state, should it become an independent nation or should it retain its commonwealth status? This topic is seldom seen on stage, at least on the mainland. So it feels fresh, though Rivera sometimes uses it as a mere pretext for a situation out of a romance novel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Rivera, known for writing plays that are casseroles of the realistic and the fantastic, has neatly sliced the two into a reality sandwich on supernatural bread for his new play, "References to Salvador Dali Make Me Hot." The show's world premiere is this week at South Coast Repertory, giving the prolific Rivera an unusual twofer to start the year: His other new work, "Sonnets for an Old Century," received its premiere Jan. 14 in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Abandon all hope ye who enter here. Brooklyn is a war zone. Angels are warring in heaven. God is getting old. Men are having babies and every indication is that the world might be coming to an end. That is the premise of Jose Rivera's "Marisol," a comedy of terminal devastation that concentrates as many ideas as events into the time it takes to write off the world--and then write it back in.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1992 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Playwright Jose Rivera sits at a cluttered wooden desk in a vintage building near Hollywood and Cahuenga. A snapshot of himself in a casual moment with Gabriel Garcia Marquez, just brandished for a visitor's inspection, lies on top of a stack of papers, literally inches away from a script treatment for an ABC pilot.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Ahhh, a new year and so many unknowns: Will Jay, Dave and Johnny be genetically spliced to produce the Ultimate Talk Show Host? Will the Yuppie-in-Chief name Stevie Nicks to run the NEA? Who will Sinead pick as her tag team partner against Madonna and the Pope? Will the activist group AWOE (Actresses With One Eyebrow) demand that one of them be chosen to play Frida Kahlo? Oh well, frivolity aside, one thing is certain: You'll be hearing these names and seeing these faces in the next 365.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A la Gabriel Garcia Marquez, "Each Day Dies With Sleep" features strange acts of nature, such as oranges that turn black and spurt gasoline. But Jose Rivera's 1990 play takes its stately title from a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem and its darkly whimsical tone from Gregory Corso. And although Rivera bows to Marquez's magical realism in his use of exaggerated plot elements, the play is more overheated than magical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997 | AL MARTINEZ
I don't know how many plays and movies I've seen that try to define L.A., but I saw another one recently that also doesn't quite make it. It was a play at the Mark Taper called "Street of the Sun" by Jose Rivera, who came here from New York to get rich and presumably has done OK, but still writes about how much he hates the place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Rivera, known for writing plays that are casseroles of the realistic and the fantastic, has neatly sliced the two into a reality sandwich on supernatural bread for his new play, "References to Salvador Dali Make Me Hot." The show's world premiere is this week at South Coast Repertory, giving the prolific Rivera an unusual twofer to start the year: His other new work, "Sonnets for an Old Century," received its premiere Jan. 14 in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
With its inviting porch and lobby, the new 99-seat Greenway Court Theatre, on the campus of Fairfax High School, is remarkably homey and hospitable--very haimish, to use a familiar Fairfax district word. But the venue's first production, "Sonnets for an Old Century," is less appealing. Playwright Jose Rivera strung together monologues for 24 actors. Along with flimsy connective tissue and an intermission, this "Old Century" lasts three hours. That's about two hours too long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997 | AL MARTINEZ
I don't know how many plays and movies I've seen that try to define L.A., but I saw another one recently that also doesn't quite make it. It was a play at the Mark Taper called "Street of the Sun" by Jose Rivera, who came here from New York to get rich and presumably has done OK, but still writes about how much he hates the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Welcome to the thousand natural shocks Los Angeles is heir to--riots, fires, earthquakes, salacious television producers with hair plugs. In "The Street of the Sun," a new play by Jose Rivera, the city is chief protagonist among many characters, realistic and fantastic. Having its world premiere at the Mark Taper Forum as the second offering of the summer's New Theatre for Now series, the play is a hodgepodge that suffers more from uneven writing than from its funky mix of styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1997 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
Jose Rivera likes to examine Los Angeles from the high vantage points near the Griffith Observatory, not far from his Los Feliz home. "From here you can see a pattern," he said, during a conversation at the snack bar near the observatory. "The city seems more manageable." On this particular morning, however, no pattern was readily apparent. Smog obscured most of the vista beyond Griffith Park itself. How apt.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1995
The fact of the matter: Los Angeles is an industry town, and theater is not its industry. This fact affects the life and work of all who choose to make theater here. To assess the general state of the theater in Los Angeles today, Times Theater Critic Laurie Winer brought together a round-table discussion with five people whose experiences are utterly diverse but who are tied together by their passion for making theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1995
The fact of the matter: Los Angeles is an industry town, and theater is not its industry. This fact affects the life and work of all who choose to make theater here. To assess the general state of the theater in Los Angeles today, Times Theater Critic Laurie Winer brought together a round-table discussion with five people whose experiences are utterly diverse but who are tied together by their passion for making theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
With its inviting porch and lobby, the new 99-seat Greenway Court Theatre, on the campus of Fairfax High School, is remarkably homey and hospitable--very haimish, to use a familiar Fairfax district word. But the venue's first production, "Sonnets for an Old Century," is less appealing. Playwright Jose Rivera strung together monologues for 24 actors. Along with flimsy connective tissue and an intermission, this "Old Century" lasts three hours. That's about two hours too long.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In a torrential rain of apocalyptic dimensions, a man picks up a hitchhiker in his car. She is drenched and hugely pregnant--two years pregnant. When he takes her home, all of the clocks in his apartment stop. In fact, time stops. Outside, the world changes dramatically. People age and go mad. But in that apartment, eternity blossoms. In other words, two people have fallen in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1994 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A la Gabriel Garcia Marquez, "Each Day Dies With Sleep" features strange acts of nature, such as oranges that turn black and spurt gasoline. But Jose Rivera's 1990 play takes its stately title from a Gerard Manley Hopkins poem and its darkly whimsical tone from Gregory Corso. And although Rivera bows to Marquez's magical realism in his use of exaggerated plot elements, the play is more overheated than magical.
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