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Jose Saramago

WORLD
December 2, 2004 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
South African novelist Nadine Gordimer said she thought that if musicians singing to "feed the world" could raise funds to fight hunger, perhaps writers could put together a "read the world" collection of short stories to raise money to help people with the virus that causes AIDS. She asked 20 of the world's leading authors to contribute to an anthology, without fee or royalties.
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OPINION
April 20, 2003 | Carlos Fuentes, Carlos Fuentes is the author of numerous books, including "The Death of Artemio Cruz" and "The Years With Laura Diaz."
When I arrived in Havana on Jan. 2, 1959, Fidel Castro had not yet entered the Cuban capital. He was advancing slowly by jeep along a victory route from Santiago, accompanied by a dove trained to stay on his shoulder. He would interrupt his speeches along the way with a rhetorical question: "Am I going the right way, Camilo?" The question was ostensibly addressed to Camilo Cienfuegos, his second in command during the revolution, but in a sense it was also addressed to all Cubans.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
IN her novel "Delirium," the Colombian writer Laura Restrepo attempts to write about madness from the inside and outside all at once. Set primarily in Bogota, the book operates from a simple premise: A former university professor named Aguilar returns home from a short trip to find that his wife, Agustina, has shrugged off the mantle of her sanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Movie Critic
In Fernando Meirelles' land of the blind, the one-eyed man isn't king -- the morally degenerate opportunist is. After a mysterious plague of sightlessness strikes an anonymous city, a shadowy Orwellian government quarantines the afflicted in a decommissioned sanitarium, leaving them to duke it out over an ever-dwindling supply of TV dinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Art Winslow, Winslow is a former literary and executive editor of the Nation.
Is Jose Manuel Prieto swanning after Marcel Proust in his novel "Rex"? After all, his narrator's account of temps perdu is saturated with homage to The Writer, whose Book he used as the basic curriculum to tutor a young man whose parents may have been Russian mobsters, hiding out in a mansion on Spain's Costa del Sol.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2004 | Patrick Giles, Special to The Times
Telling Tales Edited by Nadine Gordimer Picador: 306 pp., $14 paper * AIDS in America may seem less threatening than it was a decade ago -- although rising numbers of sexually transmitted diseases and the long-term failure of some AIDS-related treatments suggest such complacency is misplaced -- but it continues to rage elsewhere. Worldwide, "40 million ...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Imagination is a mysterious faculty, essential not only to the creation of art but also to the life of the mind itself. As the author of many acclaimed works of science fiction (perhaps a more accurate term would be fantasy), Ursula K. Le Guin knows a great deal about the workings of imagination and how important it is in transforming the raw material of experience into something new and strange.
NEWS
March 3, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a ferocious five-year battle that drew in environmentalists, a Nobel Prize winner and Hollywood stars, the Mexican government and Mitsubishi Corp. announced Thursday that they were canceling plans for a giant saltworks in Baja California Sur. In a surprise announcement, President Ernesto Zedillo said the government had withdrawn its support from the venture because it would alter the stunning landscape of arid desert.
NEWS
May 18, 2002 | NICK OWCHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judas is the New Testament's dark angel. The Gospel of John puts him in the shadows, an appropriate place for a figure who's a smudge of dirt on the luminous story of the New Testament. He's also a bundle of contradictions: Fierce and menacing, he sent his savior off to execution with a kiss, so willing was he to trade reward in the hereafter for cash in the here and now.
OPINION
May 28, 2004 | Walter Reich
Genocidal mass murder continues to foul the world. So do large-scale massacres of civilians and brutal executions. Yet the foulest epithet in any language -- "Nazi" -- is hurled not against any of the perpetrators of those crimes but, uniquely and systematically, against Israel. It's not as if the real horrors are hard to find.
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