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Jose Sarney

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | Nick Owchar, Times Staff Writer
IT'S easy to understand why Gregory Rabassa wanted to translate Jose Sarney's "Master of the Sea." Rabassa's recent memoir, "If This Be Treason," suggests how this premier translator identifies the works he wants to translate: They all present a variety of subjects in an uncommon way. Which is certainly true of this novel by Sarney, a former president of Brazil (1985-1990), for no detail is surrendered to cliche.
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NEWS
March 23, 1988
In a major victory for President Jose Sarney, Brazil's Constituent Assembly voted 344-212 to retain the country's system of a strong executive presidency. Sarney, a conservative leader, led the fight against advocates of a parliamentary system, which would have effectively placed power in the hands of a prime minister. The vote was part of the Constituent Assembly's work on a new constitution to seal Brazil's return to democracy.
WORLD
May 17, 2004 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Of the dozens of characters Jose Sarney has invented as a novelist, perhaps none has so colorful a past, or so interesting a present, as the person he is now busily reinventing: himself. More than just an author of moderate renown, Sarney is a politician -- and a former president of Brazil at that.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Jose Sarney's ruling center-right party, saddled with voter discontent stemming from the country's 700% inflation, was taking a beating late Wednesday from both the right and left in municipal election returns. In the mayor's race in Sao Paulo, Luiza Erundina, 53, a social worker and self-proclaimed Marxist, narrowly defeated millionaire businessman Paulo Maluf. Erundina, representing the Workers' Party, becomes the first woman mayor of South America's largest city.
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazilian President Jose Sarney, lacking solid support from his majority party, is attempting to form a new political alliance more loyal to his administration. Sarney is asking politicians to sign a document that includes a pledge "to support the president in the actions that he deems appropriate in the legislative, governmental and political area."
NEWS
July 12, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's biggest political party, once firmly united against military rule, is breaking up in stormy controversy over its relationship with President Jose Sarney and his unpopular administration. The troubles in the Party of the Brazilian Democratic Movement, or PMDB, reflect a panorama of political confusion in Brazil as the largest country in Latin America moves toward full democracy.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
International pressure for the preservation of Amazon rain forests has triggered a defiant barrage of nationalist reaction in Brazil. President Jose Sarney has declared repeatedly in recent weeks that Brazil will accept no Amazon conservation proposals that infringe on Brazil's sovereignty. Some foreign proposals have called for international supervision of Amazon conservation programs as a condition for financial aid or foreign debt relief.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Finance Minister Luiz Carlos Bresser Pereira resigned Friday in a dispute with President Jose Sarney over proposed tax and austerity measures aimed at reducing Brazil's huge government deficit. Bresser, who took the job in April, was the third finance minister to quit since Sarney took office in March, 1985. Like Bresser, the previous ministers resigned under the pressure of double-digit monthly inflation and the largest foreign debt--now $113 billion--owed by a developing country.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's Congress adopted a constitutional provision Thursday that will keep President Jose Sarney in office until March, 1990, a year longer than his opponents had hoped. The vote gives Sarney, a civilian who took office in 1985 at the end of 21 years of military government, a total of five years as "transitional" president.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
International pressure for the preservation of Amazon rain forests has triggered a defiant barrage of nationalist reaction in Brazil. President Jose Sarney has declared repeatedly in recent weeks that Brazil will accept no Amazon conservation proposals that infringe on Brazil's sovereignty. Some foreign proposals have called for international supervision of Amazon conservation programs as a condition for financial aid or foreign debt relief.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Jose Sarney's ruling center-right party, saddled with voter discontent stemming from the country's 700% inflation, was taking a beating late Wednesday from both the right and left in municipal election returns. In the mayor's race in Sao Paulo, Luiza Erundina, 53, a social worker and self-proclaimed Marxist, narrowly defeated millionaire businessman Paulo Maluf. Erundina, representing the Workers' Party, becomes the first woman mayor of South America's largest city.
NEWS
July 12, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's biggest political party, once firmly united against military rule, is breaking up in stormy controversy over its relationship with President Jose Sarney and his unpopular administration. The troubles in the Party of the Brazilian Democratic Movement, or PMDB, reflect a panorama of political confusion in Brazil as the largest country in Latin America moves toward full democracy.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's Congress adopted a constitutional provision Thursday that will keep President Jose Sarney in office until March, 1990, a year longer than his opponents had hoped. The vote gives Sarney, a civilian who took office in 1985 at the end of 21 years of military government, a total of five years as "transitional" president.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A tempestuous corruption scandal is lashing Brazil's three-year-old civilian government, and President Jose Sarney is feeling the sting. For more than two months, a special Senate commission has been investigating allegations of graft and illicit patronage in Sarney's administration. The scandal has become the hottest story in Latin America's biggest country, sparking banner headlines in newspapers, cover stories in magazines and extensive coverage on television.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A tempestuous corruption scandal is lashing Brazil's three-year-old civilian government, and President Jose Sarney is feeling the sting. For more than two months, a special Senate commission has been investigating allegations of graft and illicit patronage in Sarney's administration. The scandal has become the hottest story in Latin America's biggest country, sparking banner headlines in newspapers, cover stories in magazines and extensive coverage on television.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Brazil's constitutional assembly has reached a decisive stage in its work on a new constitution, and the armed forces have increased the pressure to produce a document acceptable to them. The pressure is seen by many Brazilians as proof that the military, which ruled Brazil for 21 years after a coup in 1964, did not relinquish all political power when it returned the government to civilians in 1985.
NEWS
March 23, 1988
In a major victory for President Jose Sarney, Brazil's Constituent Assembly voted 344-212 to retain the country's system of a strong executive presidency. Sarney, a conservative leader, led the fight against advocates of a parliamentary system, which would have effectively placed power in the hands of a prime minister. The vote was part of the Constituent Assembly's work on a new constitution to seal Brazil's return to democracy.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A camera caught what looked like a tear sliding down President Jose Sarney's cheek the other day, and the published photo quickly became a symbol of troubled times in Brazil. Latin America's biggest country is frustrated and demoralized by a withering combination of economic decay and political disarray.
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