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Jose Sorzano

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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan has personally approved a new U.S. offer to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega that would require the Panamanian strongman to leave his country for a year but apparently would allow him to retain effective control of the government, Administration sources said Monday. The sources said that Noriega is expected to accept or reject the proposal within the next day or two.
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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan has personally approved a new U.S. offer to Gen. Manuel A. Noriega that would require the Panamanian strongman to leave his country for a year but apparently would allow him to retain effective control of the government, Administration sources said Monday. The sources said that Noriega is expected to accept or reject the proposal within the next day or two.
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NEWS
February 5, 1986
Spain's Jaime de Pinies, president of the U.N. General Assembly, appointed an 18-member panel to review the administrative and financial workings of the United Nations, which is facing one of the worst financial crises in its 40-year history. Because of unpaid dues, the organization entered the new year with a $225-million shortfall in a budget of more than $800 million. The panel, which is to issue a report by September, includes Jose Sorzano, a former deputy U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1997 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Today": U.S. adoptions: how to adopt, costs of adoption, adoption problems, 5 a.m. (4)(36)(39). "John McLaughlin's One on One": Jury system, 1:30 p.m. (28). "Evans & Novak": Newly reelected New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, 2:30 p.m., repeats Sunday 7 a.m. CNN. "Inside Politics Weekend": New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman, 3:30 p.m.; repeats midnight, CNN.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | United Press International
National security adviser Frank C. Carlucci opened a new White House campaign today for renewed military aid to the Nicaraguan rebels, and strongly denied that he feels their case is hopeless. Carlucci also labeled as "false" and "distorted" reports that he had told a National Security Council staff meeting that it is not possible for the rebels, known as contras , to defeat the Marxist-led Sandinista government in Nicaragua.
NEWS
May 10, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The United States stood alone in the Security Council on Thursday to defend its economic embargo against Nicaragua in a debate that climaxed in a verbal duel between Soviet envoy Oleg A. Troyanovsky and U.S. delegate Jose Sorzano. Troyanovsky and more than a dozen other speakers denounced the Reagan Administration's action as "coercion" and as intervention in the affairs of Nicaragua.
NEWS
January 12, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His father was an Austrian Jew who escaped the Nazi Holocaust by fleeing to Cuba. His mother was a Catholic Cuban who escaped Havana after Fidel Castro came to power. Their son, Otto Juan Reich, came to America at 14 with a personal and passionate distrust of dictatorships.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan announced the appointment of eight new National Security Council staff members Wednesday, a move described as adding "fresh blood" to an embattled agency sapped by the Iran arms sale controversy. The new staff members include Fritz W. Ermarth, the CIA's ranking Soviet affairs expert, and Robert B. Oakley, who recently headed the State Department's anti-terrorism office. Overhauls Apparatus Agency chief Frank C.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, still smarting from conservative attacks on his Central America peace proposals, will meet next week in Los Angeles with Nicaraguan opposition leaders in a public show of support for the contras , the White House said Thursday. The session, to be held on Thursday, will include talks with both the rebels' six-member political directorate and their military commander, Enrique Bermudez, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, despite objections from Vice President George Bush, continued working Friday toward a deal with Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega under which the United States would drop drug charges against the general in exchange for his retirement. White House officials said the proposed deal with Noriega was still unsigned, and one aide quoted Chief of Staff Howard H. Baker Jr. as saying details of the bargain were "changing minute by minute."
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