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Josef Begun

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NEWS
January 18, 1988
Hebrew teacher Josef Begun, 55, said he and family members will fly to Israel today, ending his 16-year struggle to leave the Soviet Union. Begun said they will fly directly to Tel Aviv via Bucharest, Romania, in one day, unlike the majority of Jewish refuseniks, who first stop in Vienna before going on to Israel, to the United States or to other Western countries.
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NEWS
May 11, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, a leading Jewish refusenik whose struggle to emigrate led to his imprisonment before Soviet authorities granted him an exit visa, on Tuesday likened the plight of Soviet Jews to "a kind of spiritual genocide." In his first visit to Los Angeles, Begun met at the Simon Wiesenthal Center with local Jewish leaders and discussed a meeting he and a group of religious leaders had with President Reagan earlier this month.
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NEWS
February 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Psychiatrist Anatoly Koryagin came home Thursday after five years in a labor camp, and officials said Jewish activist Josef Begun will be out of prison today, nearly a week after his release was first announced. Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov reported the releases at a news briefing.
NEWS
January 19, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, who achieved fame as a Jewish refusenik because of heavy-handed KGB tactics in the so-called "Battle of the Arbat" a year ago, left for Israel with his family on Monday. "Shalom," Begun said, using the Hebrew word for peace, as he greeted about 200 well-wishers who came to see him off at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport. Begun and his family left for Bucharest, Romania, where they will spend the night before flying today to Israel.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | Associated Press
Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres said Tuesday that the granting of exit visas to Josef Begun and other Jewish activists marked a limited change in Soviet emigration policy and a "moral victory" for Israel. "But this is not the change we are looking for, neither is it strong enough . . . to paint the Russian policy in a different color," he said. Peres said "I wouldn't be surprised" if the meeting between Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and U.S. Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
American television networks protested Tuesday that their camera crews covering a demonstration by Jewish refuseniks were roughed up by what one TV correspondent termed "government-sanctioned goons." A Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman, Gennady I. Gerasimov, said he will look into the matter and try to find out who is responsible for damaging cameras and other TV equipment.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, a leading Jewish refusenik whose struggle to emigrate led to his imprisonment before Soviet authorities granted him an exit visa, on Tuesday likened the plight of Soviet Jews to "a kind of spiritual genocide." In his first visit to Los Angeles, Begun met at the Simon Wiesenthal Center with local Jewish leaders and discussed a meeting he and a group of religious leaders had with President Reagan earlier this month.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, the Jewish dissident released Friday from Chistopol prison, received a hero's welcome Monday in Moscow and promised to continue fighting for human rights. Begun, whose release had been delayed for a week after it was announced by a Soviet official, said he was "madly happy." Fellow Jews shouted "Shalom!" (peace), sang Hebrew songs and danced in the Kazan railroad station as Begun's train pulled in.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jewish activist Josef Begun was freed and reunited with his family Friday after more than three years in Chistopol Prison and a week of conflicting reports about his fate, relatives in Moscow reported. "Finally he is free," Yana Begun, the wife of Begun's son, Boris, said in a telephone interview. "Inna (Begun's wife) said he did not look well. His voice was cheerful," she said. "Of course, I am happy now. It has been a difficult struggle."
NEWS
January 19, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, who achieved fame as a Jewish refusenik because of heavy-handed KGB tactics in the so-called "Battle of the Arbat" a year ago, left for Israel with his family on Monday. "Shalom," Begun said, using the Hebrew word for peace, as he greeted about 200 well-wishers who came to see him off at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport. Begun and his family left for Bucharest, Romania, where they will spend the night before flying today to Israel.
NEWS
January 18, 1988
Hebrew teacher Josef Begun, 55, said he and family members will fly to Israel today, ending his 16-year struggle to leave the Soviet Union. Begun said they will fly directly to Tel Aviv via Bucharest, Romania, in one day, unlike the majority of Jewish refuseniks, who first stop in Vienna before going on to Israel, to the United States or to other Western countries.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
American television networks protested Tuesday that their camera crews covering a demonstration by Jewish refuseniks were roughed up by what one TV correspondent termed "government-sanctioned goons." A Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman, Gennady I. Gerasimov, said he will look into the matter and try to find out who is responsible for damaging cameras and other TV equipment.
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | Associated Press
Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres said Tuesday that the granting of exit visas to Josef Begun and other Jewish activists marked a limited change in Soviet emigration policy and a "moral victory" for Israel. "But this is not the change we are looking for, neither is it strong enough . . . to paint the Russian policy in a different color," he said. Peres said "I wouldn't be surprised" if the meeting between Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and U.S. Secretary of State George P.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet dissident Josef Begun and several other Jews barred from emigrating on grounds that they have knowledge of state secrets have been told that they will be given permission to leave the country, Begun said Monday. The decision may indicate that the logjam blocking the departure of many would-be emigres on secrecy grounds may have been broken.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Josef Begun, the Jewish dissident released Friday from Chistopol prison, received a hero's welcome Monday in Moscow and promised to continue fighting for human rights. Begun, whose release had been delayed for a week after it was announced by a Soviet official, said he was "madly happy." Fellow Jews shouted "Shalom!" (peace), sang Hebrew songs and danced in the Kazan railroad station as Begun's train pulled in.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jewish activist Josef Begun was freed and reunited with his family Friday after more than three years in Chistopol Prison and a week of conflicting reports about his fate, relatives in Moscow reported. "Finally he is free," Yana Begun, the wife of Begun's son, Boris, said in a telephone interview. "Inna (Begun's wife) said he did not look well. His voice was cheerful," she said. "Of course, I am happy now. It has been a difficult struggle."
NEWS
February 17, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jewish activist Josef Begun is still in prison, and Soviet authorities say they have had no orders to release him, his wife, Inna, reported Monday. Georgy A. Arbatov, director of the Soviets' Institute for the U.S.A. and Canada, said on CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that Begun had been released, although not as a result of five days of demonstrations staged on his behalf in Moscow last week. Another demonstration in support of Begun took place in New York on Monday.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Psychiatrist Anatoly Koryagin came home Thursday after five years in a labor camp, and officials said Jewish activist Josef Begun will be out of prison today, nearly a week after his release was first announced. Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov reported the releases at a news briefing.
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