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Josef Brodsky

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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what an official described Thursday as a mass apology for past injustices, Soviet citizenship has been restored for novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn and 22 others who were once reviled and punished as critics of the Soviet system.
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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what an official described Thursday as a mass apology for past injustices, Soviet citizenship has been restored for novelist Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn and 22 others who were once reviled and punished as critics of the Soviet system.
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NEWS
September 19, 1988 | DAVE JOHNSON
--While thousands of firefighters battled to save forests in and around Yellowstone National Park, others worried about specific trees. Bill Cody feared that the blazes would claim a fir bearing an inscription by his grandfather, Western showman William F. (Buffalo Bill) Cody, but a helicopter flight showed that it was safe, despite the fact that trees only 6 feet away had burned.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, "Stalin's Funeral" would have been a sensation. Written and directed by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the Soviet Union's best-known modern-day poet, the new film depicts life under Josef V. Stalin as a nightmare, which culminated in hundreds of deaths in the frenzied crowd outside the Moscow hall where the dictator's body lay in state in March, 1953.
BOOKS
September 6, 1987 | Caryl Phillips, Phillips is the author of "The European Tribe."
Last year, Derek Walcott's "Collected Poems" appeared in a 500-page volume. It seemed to me then, and his new collection of verse confirms my feelings, that it may have been a somewhat premature assembling of the poet's canon. "The Arkansas Testament" not only finds Walcott examining some of his old themes, but doing so with youthful invention. Born in 1930 on the small Caribbean island of St. Lucia, Walcott now divides his time between Boston and Trinidad.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
Almost at the End of the World by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, translated by Antonina W. Bouis, Albert C. Todd and Yevgeny Yevtushenko (Holt: $15.95) Yevgeny Yevtushenko is growing older. Can he be growing better? Here and there, in this very mixed collection, there are signs that he may be. From the time he caught the world's eye as the Nureyev of Russian poetry--handsome, romantic, newsworthy and well paid--Yevtushenko has been followed by controversy and not a little suspicion.
BOOKS
January 3, 1988 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
Poetry may have become something of a tender subject on this page ever since Jack Miles, who owns the page and occasionally asks me to fill it, announced that The Book Review would henceforth publish a poem each week and fewer poetry reviews. This created a small literary scandal which, in the way of such things, expanded and transmogrified until it came to seem that some poets felt that the plan was an insult to their art.
BOOKS
June 9, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
A dusty clump resembling a nettle grew near the rubbish heap behind Seamus Heaney's childhood home. It was mint, though. Its pungency: spelled promise And newness in the backyard of our life As if something callow yet tenacious Sauntered in green alleys and grew rife. "Mint" is one of many childhood recollections in Heaney's new collection, "The Spirit Level." His Irish farmhouse beginnings have been the launch point and beacon for a poetry that has gone immeasurably beyond them.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987 | Richard Eder
Vassily Aksyonov, whose novel, "The Burn," is one of the masterpieces of dissident Soviet literature, has been living in this country for the last half-dozen years. He is not really qualified to write about the United States. He is marvelously well qualified to write about himself in the United States. "In Search of Melancholy Baby" does too much of the first and too little of the second. It takes a long time for an emigre to arrive; particularly, an emigre writer.
BOOKS
May 5, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
John Updike compares the creative writer to a mariner who sets a course out to sea (in contrast with the critic, who hugs the shore). On rare occasions in history, though, literature requires something beyond course-setting. There are eras of such protracted cataclysm that they bend the straight compass-heading into a curve. Navigation becomes circumnavigation.
BOOKS
August 13, 1989 | Zinovy Zinik, Zinik's recent novel, "The Mushroom-Picker," was published this year by St. Martin's Press. and
Vassily Aksyonov tells his story of Moscow life of the 1970s as an adventure yarn about a group of dissident photographers who, in spite of KGB schemings, produce an "underground" photography album , "Say Cheese!" and, having failed to publish it officially, smuggle it to the West.
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