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Josef Mindszenty

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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Reuters
The body of Cardinal Josef Mindszenty, a symbol of the Roman Catholic Church's suffering under communism, was brought home to Hungary for reburial Friday, 20 years after he went into reluctant exile. The coffin of the late Hungarian primate was borne in a solemn cortege from Mariazell in Austria, where he died in 1975 at the age of 83. Hungarian villagers holding flowers and photographs of Mindszenty lined the route to the basilica at Esztergom where he will be interred in the crypt today.
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NEWS
August 17, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning his first visit to Hungary, Pope John Paul II bowed in tribute to one of the Cold War's fiercest anti-Communists on Friday, but he told East Europeans that new-found democracy alone cannot cure all of their problems. The pontiff, looking refreshed after a three-day stop in his native Poland, brought to Hungary the same cry for continental unity that he left with his countrymen.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day as dreary as the funeral dirges that droned from Esztergom's hilltop cathedral, Hungarians and Roman Catholic pilgrims Saturday laid to rest the remains of Cardinal Josef Mindszenty and the legacy of guilt borne by those whose compromise abandoned him to a foreign grave. More than 50,000 of the faithful attended an open-air funeral Mass on the soggy cathedral lawns overlooking the Danube River to rebury an unflinching fighter for religious freedom.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day as dreary as the funeral dirges that droned from Esztergom's hilltop cathedral, Hungarians and Roman Catholic pilgrims Saturday laid to rest the remains of Cardinal Josef Mindszenty and the legacy of guilt borne by those whose compromise abandoned him to a foreign grave. More than 50,000 of the faithful attended an open-air funeral Mass on the soggy cathedral lawns overlooking the Danube River to rebury an unflinching fighter for religious freedom.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning his first visit to Hungary, Pope John Paul II bowed in tribute to one of the Cold War's fiercest anti-Communists on Friday, but he told East Europeans that new-found democracy alone cannot cure all of their problems. The pontiff, looking refreshed after a three-day stop in his native Poland, brought to Hungary the same cry for continental unity that he left with his countrymen.
NEWS
March 6, 1993
Luis Kutner, 84, colorful Chicago lawyer who originated the "living will" in 1930 so critically ill patients could forgo artificial life support, and who co-founded Amnesty International in 1961. For six decades, Kutner also advocated World Habeus Corpus, an international tribunal to resolve conflicts between nations. A Renaissance man, Kutner was judged one of the 15 foremost poets in America in 1952 and and his paintings are exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In taking refuge in the offices of the papal nuncio in Panama City, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega has borrowed a popular technique from the dissidents of the world, thousands of whom have sought protection and escape through foreign embassies throughout the 20th Century. Under international law, foreign embassies and the ground on which they sit are considered the territory of the country to which they belong.
SPORTS
July 5, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Cardinal Laszlo Lekai, the leader of Hungary's 6.5 million Roman Catholics whose efforts to coexist with the Communist government contrasted strongly with those of his predecessor, Cardinal Josef Mindszenty, died Monday night of a heart attack. Lekai, 76, who had been in poor health for several months, had headed the Roman Catholic Church in Hungary since 1976.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2003 | From the Washington Post
Edward M. Korry, a former ambassador to Chile who in the 1970s was a central figure in media accounts of U.S. covert action against Chile's Marxist president, Salvador Allende, has died. He was 81. Korry died of cancer Wednesday at his home in Charlotte, N.C. A former ambassador to Ethiopia, Korry also was European editor for Look magazine and a United Press correspondent in Europe after World War II. In 1972 and 1973, he was president of the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | FRED F. WOERNER and WILLIAM RATLIFF, Gen. Fred F. Woerner was commander of the U.S. Southern Command in Panama from June, 1987, to September, 1989. William Ratliff is a senior research fellow and Panama specialist at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
On Christmas Eve, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega quietly slipped into the Papal Nunciature in Panama City and asked for asylum. Almost immediately, the stock of the new government of Guillermo Endara went up and resistance to U.S. military forces declined. Noriega undoubtedly will get the asylum, and the safe transit, he seeks. Although some parties will protest, in the long run everyone--with the exception, perhaps, of Noriega--will breathe easier for it.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Reuters
The body of Cardinal Josef Mindszenty, a symbol of the Roman Catholic Church's suffering under communism, was brought home to Hungary for reburial Friday, 20 years after he went into reluctant exile. The coffin of the late Hungarian primate was borne in a solemn cortege from Mariazell in Austria, where he died in 1975 at the age of 83. Hungarian villagers holding flowers and photographs of Mindszenty lined the route to the basilica at Esztergom where he will be interred in the crypt today.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | KENNETH FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A hardening determination by the Bush Administration to apprehend Manuel A. Noriega left the self-proclaimed "maximum leader" of Panama isolated inside the Vatican embassy on Monday, even as American troops used stringent measures to underline the tough U.S. stance.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twice on Monday, traffic police scattered the holiday crowd gathered on the outskirts of St. Peter's Square for the traditional Christmas blessing from Pope John Paul II--once for the hurrying Cadillac of the U.S. ambassador, once for the Mercedes-Benz of the Vatican secretary of state. A special day reserved at the Vatican for joyful prayer and priestly fraternity had instead become the domain of diplomats, lawyers and, looming behind them, politicians of half a dozen countries.
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