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Josef Schwammberger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
Josef Schwammberger, a former Nazi labor camp commander who was known for his sadism and hid for 40 years in Argentina before being captured and returned to Germany for trial, has died in a prison hospital. He was 92. Schwammberger died Thursday night in the hospital in Hohenasperg, outside the southwestern city of Stuttgart, Tomke Beddies, a spokeswoman for Stuttgart's prosecutors office, said Friday. He had been at the hospital for treatment since Sept.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
Josef Schwammberger, a former Nazi labor camp commander who was known for his sadism and hid for 40 years in Argentina before being captured and returned to Germany for trial, has died in a prison hospital. He was 92. Schwammberger died Thursday night in the hospital in Hohenasperg, outside the southwestern city of Stuttgart, Tomke Beddies, a spokeswoman for Stuttgart's prosecutors office, said Friday. He had been at the hospital for treatment since Sept.
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NEWS
May 8, 1990 | Reuters
West German Nazi-hunters paid $310,000 for information that led to the capture of a camp commandant charged with killing at least 5,000 Jews, the West German war crimes prosecutor said Monday. The record bounty was paid to an anonymous informer who led investigators to Argentina, where Josef Schwammberger had been living in hiding for three decades, Alfred Streim said after addressing the World Jewish Congress in West Berlin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Abraham Secemski heard the name of Nazi commandant Josef Schwammberger on a Chicago radio station in 1987, the Holocaust survivor had already spent 43 years trying to forget his tormentor. In 1943 and 1944, Secemski was imprisoned at Przemysl, one of two Nazi forced-labor camps that Schwammberger operated in Poland. There, Secemski--then 19--watched the commandant kill scores of Jews. His brother, father and three uncles were executed by Schwammberger's guards.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
An Argentine federal judge approved the extradition to West Germany of Josef Schwammberger, a former Nazi officer accused of responsibility for the murder of thousands of Jews in Poland during World War II. Judge Vicente Bretal said he turned down Schwammberger's request to be tried in Buenos Aires because the alleged crimes had taken place before the 76-year-old Austrian was naturalized as an Argentine citizen in 1965.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Associated Press
A Nazi-hunter group Friday handed the Argentine ambassador its files on Josef Schwammberger, arrested a week ago in Argentina, and offered its help in prosecuting him for war crimes. Schwammberger was ranked fifth among most-wanted Nazi war criminals, said Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center, who met with Ambassador Enrique Candioti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Abraham Secemski heard the name of Nazi commandant Josef Schwammberger on a Chicago radio station in 1987, the Holocaust survivor had already spent 43 years trying to forget his tormentor. In 1943 and 1944, Secemski was imprisoned at Przemysl, one of two Nazi forced-labor camps that Schwammberger operated in Poland. There, Secemski--then 19--watched the commandant kill scores of Jews. His brother, father and three uncles were executed by Schwammberger's guards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987 | BILL BLANNING, United Press International
Deep in the archives of the United Nations are stacks of files that Nazi hunters believe will provide new and damning evidence against thousands of suspected Nazi war criminals. About 8,000 files, which have collected dust for 40 years, are of particular interest to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Los Angeles organization that tracks former Nazis and monitors anti-Semitic acts worldwide.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that many believe signals the end of the era of Nazi war crime trials, a German court Monday sentenced former World War II slave labor camp commander Josef Schwammberger to life imprisonment for mass murder during the height of the Holocaust. Schwammberger, now 80 years old, severely deaf and stooped with age, was found guilty of personally killing one or more individuals on seven occasions and, in 32 instances, of being an accomplice to large-scale murder.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Forty-five years later, Abraham Secemski's memories of Josef Schwammberger hadn't faded: "A friend of mine--we went to school together--was a few rows behind me at roll call. Mr. Schwammberger ordered him forward, because his face wasn't washed. The minute he stepped out, Schwammberger shot him." Secemski survived nine Nazi labor camps in Poland. "I forgot the others. But Mr. Schwammberger I never forgot."
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that many believe signals the end of the era of Nazi war crime trials, a German court Monday sentenced former World War II slave labor camp commander Josef Schwammberger to life imprisonment for mass murder during the height of the Holocaust. Schwammberger, now 80 years old, severely deaf and stooped with age, was found guilty of personally killing one or more individuals on seven occasions and, in 32 instances, of being an accomplice to large-scale murder.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little fanfare, in a courtroom that is usually half empty, one of the final scenes of the Holocaust plays itself out. Here unfolds what is probably the last major trial of a Nazi war criminal--the end of an era spanning the better part of half a century in which Germans and Jews who survived the chaos of World War II have sifted through the horror of a bygone age in search of justice, meaning and retribution.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | Reuters
West German Nazi-hunters paid $310,000 for information that led to the capture of a camp commandant charged with killing at least 5,000 Jews, the West German war crimes prosecutor said Monday. The record bounty was paid to an anonymous informer who led investigators to Argentina, where Josef Schwammberger had been living in hiding for three decades, Alfred Streim said after addressing the World Jewish Congress in West Berlin.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
An Argentine federal judge approved the extradition to West Germany of Josef Schwammberger, a former Nazi officer accused of responsibility for the murder of thousands of Jews in Poland during World War II. Judge Vicente Bretal said he turned down Schwammberger's request to be tried in Buenos Aires because the alleged crimes had taken place before the 76-year-old Austrian was naturalized as an Argentine citizen in 1965.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Forty-five years later, Abraham Secemski's memories of Josef Schwammberger hadn't faded: "A friend of mine--we went to school together--was a few rows behind me at roll call. Mr. Schwammberger ordered him forward, because his face wasn't washed. The minute he stepped out, Schwammberger shot him." Secemski survived nine Nazi labor camps in Poland. "I forgot the others. But Mr. Schwammberger I never forgot."
NEWS
December 31, 1987
Argentina is revoking the citizenship of Nazi war crimes suspect Josef Schammberger, who is imprisoned in La Plata during extradition proceedings requested by West Germany. Secretary of Justice Enrique Paixao said that charges against Schammberger in West Germany are so "severe that the government considers it unworthy for him to possess" Argentine citizenship. Schammberger, 75, has lived in Argentina since 1949.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With little fanfare, in a courtroom that is usually half empty, one of the final scenes of the Holocaust plays itself out. Here unfolds what is probably the last major trial of a Nazi war criminal--the end of an era spanning the better part of half a century in which Germans and Jews who survived the chaos of World War II have sifted through the horror of a bygone age in search of justice, meaning and retribution.
NEWS
December 31, 1987
Argentina is revoking the citizenship of Nazi war crimes suspect Josef Schammberger, who is imprisoned in La Plata during extradition proceedings requested by West Germany. Secretary of Justice Enrique Paixao said that charges against Schammberger in West Germany are so "severe that the government considers it unworthy for him to possess" Argentine citizenship. Schammberger, 75, has lived in Argentina since 1949.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1987 | BILL BLANNING, United Press International
Deep in the archives of the United Nations are stacks of files that Nazi hunters believe will provide new and damning evidence against thousands of suspected Nazi war criminals. About 8,000 files, which have collected dust for 40 years, are of particular interest to the Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Los Angeles organization that tracks former Nazis and monitors anti-Semitic acts worldwide.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Associated Press
A Nazi-hunter group Friday handed the Argentine ambassador its files on Josef Schwammberger, arrested a week ago in Argentina, and offered its help in prosecuting him for war crimes. Schwammberger was ranked fifth among most-wanted Nazi war criminals, said Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center, who met with Ambassador Enrique Candioti.
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