Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJosef Woodard
IN THE NEWS

Josef Woodard

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000
Flowers and Then Some: Watercolorist Timberly Dunn, showing at the Buenaventura Gallery through Feb. 5, has a pleasant, soft touch in her dealings with flowers and other things found in nature, reviewer Josef Woodard notes in his Sights column Sunday. Big, Big Band: Expect improvisation and genre mixing when avant-garde jazz musician Vinny Golia brings his band of 31 musicians to Ventura High School at 8 p.m. Saturday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998
Thank you for Josef Woodard's interview with Elmer Bernstein, David Raksin, Laurence Rosenthal and Leonard Rosenman ("Scoring Some More Respect," June 14). Respect begins at home, however. One shudders to think of the editorial hatchet-job that was performed to cram the ideas of these four illustrious composers into a two-page article. Each of them merits more than that space in his own right, and The Times is long overdue in this regard. JANE BROCKMAN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1998
Josef Woodard's remark that the Budapest Festival Orchestra program of Aug. 27 was reserved for "strictly Slavic repertory" was incorrect ("Budapest Orchestra Explores Its Heritage," Aug. 29). Only Antonin Dvorak's Slavonic Dance was of Slavic origin. The Hungarian compositions by Liszt, Bartok and Kodaly have their roots in the Hungarian mode of expression. Hungarians are not of Slavic descent; their music and language has its own origin. FRANK J. PLASH San Bernardino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1994
Such a pretentious piece by Josef Woodard in Ventura County Life for Oct. 13, on the architecture of the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. Most American prisons have more outward appeal. But, of course, the Thousand Oaks City Council could have gotten a prefab design for $29.95. You have to spend the real dough to create an abortion. GILBERT S. BAHN Moorpark
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1998
As an ardent supporter of both the Monday Evening Concerts and the Green Umbrella performances, I would like to add a contrary voice to the generous review of "Cezanne's Doubt" given in your pages April 15 by Josef Woodard. What he calls "hypnotic" I call "tedious." What he refers to as "mesmerizing" I call "boring." Indeed, the work seemed to me to epitomize empty pretension at its worst, musically speaking. And the video projection accompanying the music matched it in vacuity and lack of interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1998
Bravo to Laura and Eduard Schmieder and their distinguished advisory board for launching such energetic and much-needed projects as the International Laureates Chamber Music Festival and Young Artists International ("Taking Young Musicians to the Next Stage," by Josef Woodard, July 26). Helping "novice artists with management, competitions, financial assistance and other administrative functions" is something commendable for talented young musicians entering the very difficult world of classical music.
NEWS
January 6, 2005 | Josef Woodard
Virginia native Jason Mraz's hard-to-describe stew of pop, folk, and hip-hop impulses caught many ears with the release of his 2002 debut album, "Waiting for My Rocket to Come." He's an odd mixture of indie-poppish singer-songwriter sincerity and jam-happy rocking, all spiced by the nerdiness of his musical theater background. With a live album released last year and follow-up studio album nearly in the can, Mraz continues to make the live rounds, stopping at the Ventura Theater on Saturday.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Josef Woodard
Folk singer John McCutcheon has more than songs up his sleeve, bringing an array of instruments and family-friendly storytelling to his performances. The Ventura-based "Performances to Grow On" series brings McCutcheon to the picturesque Church of Religious Science on Saturday for an evening of song singing and tale spinning. Joining McCutcheon, who has three Grammy nominations and nearly 30 albums to his credit, are the New York-based Chapin Sisters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1998
We were very pleased to hear of the success of Robert Strassburg's new opera "Congo Square" ("A Tasty Morsel of Things to Come in Opera," by Josef Woodard, Dec. 7). Woodard, who wrote that this is "an age where new American opera is almost unthinkable," might be interested to learn that there are 20 world premieres of American works scheduled for 1998-99, among them San Francisco Opera's "A Streetcar Named Desire" and our own "Fantastic Mr. Fox," which debuted Wednesday. These statistics come from OPERA America, the international service organization for opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2001
By dissing Duke Ellington, film music composer Michael Nyman revealed that he is profoundly ignorant of popular music history ("Composer of Contradictions," by Josef Woodard, Dec. 9). Nyman was quoted as saying he still likes the term "band," adding that "Duke Ellington called his band an orchestra. My title is sort of dumbing down a bit and his description was dumbing up, so to speak. He was trying to get a little more status, I'm going the other way." For Nyman's information, instrumental music organizations before, during and after the swing era, led by such names as Louis Armstrong, Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Paul Whiteman and Woody Herman, were routinely listed on record labels and at venues as orchestras.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|