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Josefina Lopez

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Josefina Lopez admits to being a woman of large appetites - for creative work, haute cuisine, political activism and erotic adventure, among other things. Where, then, could the L.A. playwright, novelist and screenwriter better hope to fulfill all those cravings simultaneously than in Paris? And where better, she reasoned, could she and her family go to escape the storm and stress of the post-Sept. 11 United States? So when the author of "Real Women Have Curves," her husband and the couple's eldest son decamped to the French capital in the mid-2000s, Lopez said, "I really thought it was for good.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Josefina Lopez admits to being a woman of large appetites - for creative work, haute cuisine, political activism and erotic adventure, among other things. Where, then, could the L.A. playwright, novelist and screenwriter better hope to fulfill all those cravings simultaneously than in Paris? And where better, she reasoned, could she and her family go to escape the storm and stress of the post-Sept. 11 United States? So when the author of "Real Women Have Curves," her husband and the couple's eldest son decamped to the French capital in the mid-2000s, Lopez said, "I really thought it was for good.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright-performer Josefina Lopez is one of those dynamos who never seems to need a break--a quality that's been a blessing and a curse. "I'm a very multi-task person," Lopez, 30, said during a recent interview in a freshly painted Hollywood bookstore cafe filled with Mexican folk art. "I feel like I can do 20 things at once." To wit: Her "Confessions of Women From East L.A." opened Thursday at Santa Ana College.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright-performer Josefina Lopez never seems to need a break--a quality that's been a blessing and a curse. "I'm a very multi-task person," Lopez, 30, said during a recent interview in a Hollywood bookstore-cafe filled with Mexican folk art. "I feel like I can do 20 things at once." To wit: Her eight-character play "Confessions of Women From East L.A." opened last week at Santa Ana College.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Four years ago, when she was 17, Josefina Lopez felt misunderstood by her parents. They had moved from Cerritos, in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico, to Los Angeles, when she was 6, hoping to give her and their other children--now eight in all--a better life. They imagined that someday she might earn a good living as a secretary, marry a nice man and have children. Instead, she wanted to go to college, become an actress or writer and have adventures.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright-performer Josefina Lopez never seems to need a break--a quality that's been a blessing and a curse. "I'm a very multi-task person," Lopez, 30, said during a recent interview in a Hollywood bookstore-cafe filled with Mexican folk art. "I feel like I can do 20 things at once." To wit: Her eight-character play "Confessions of Women From East L.A." opened last week at Santa Ana College.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It is the stuff of legends. Particularly of women. And most particularly of Latinas. Playwright Josefina Lopez, best known for her Emmy-winning play "Simply Maria," always wanted to write a story about La Llorona, the "Crying Woman" of Mexican legend. Her play "Unconquered Spirits," having its world premiere at Cal State Northridge's Little Theatre, is partly based on La Llorona and partly on Latinas from other eras. "The crying woman comes from so many places," Lopez explains.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the spring, the thoughts of carefree high school students lightly turn to what they are going to wear to the big prom. In the world of the play "Real Women Have Curves," the five women in Garcia's Sewing Factory in Los Angeles are also thinking about what those students are going to wear to the prom. But the thoughts aren't so so light or carefree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
They once were hawked on street corners, displayed like the finest artwork with their images of Aztec warriors, Virgin Marys, lions, pandas and unicorns. Laura Genao saw them growing up but never pictured herself owning one. "Too tacky," she thought. Years later, her mother slyly left one on her couch: a blanket with a giant tiger woven in shades of gray, black and white. It was then Genao learned what most Latinos in Los Angeles come to understand as children: Love it or hate it, chances are you're going to forge a bond with a San Marcos.
NEWS
April 29, 1993
Let me first congratulate you on your excellent job. However, the fact that your 10-page section (March 18) carries four advertisements for plastic surgery is insulting to me as a Latina and a woman. I know you need the ads, but you're defeating the purpose of Nuestro Tiempo, because those ads convey to women and Latinas that there's something wrong with us. That we need to be skinny, have big breasts and a perfect body. That we should change our noses, which are indigenous looking, for short European ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1999 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright-performer Josefina Lopez is one of those dynamos who never seems to need a break--a quality that's been a blessing and a curse. "I'm a very multi-task person," Lopez, 30, said during a recent interview in a freshly painted Hollywood bookstore cafe filled with Mexican folk art. "I feel like I can do 20 things at once." To wit: Her "Confessions of Women From East L.A." opened Thursday at Santa Ana College.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
It is the stuff of legends. Particularly of women. And most particularly of Latinas. Playwright Josefina Lopez, best known for her Emmy-winning play "Simply Maria," always wanted to write a story about La Llorona, the "Crying Woman" of Mexican legend. Her play "Unconquered Spirits," having its world premiere at Cal State Northridge's Little Theatre, is partly based on La Llorona and partly on Latinas from other eras. "The crying woman comes from so many places," Lopez explains.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the spring, the thoughts of carefree high school students lightly turn to what they are going to wear to the big prom. In the world of the play "Real Women Have Curves," the five women in Garcia's Sewing Factory in Los Angeles are also thinking about what those students are going to wear to the prom. But the thoughts aren't so so light or carefree.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Four years ago, when she was 17, Josefina Lopez felt misunderstood by her parents. They had moved from Cerritos, in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico, to Los Angeles, when she was 6, hoping to give her and their other children--now eight in all--a better life. They imagined that someday she might earn a good living as a secretary, marry a nice man and have children. Instead, she wanted to go to college, become an actress or writer and have adventures.
NEWS
February 7, 1991
Congratulations to Josefina Lopez ("Young Playwright Takes Giant Steps Towards Her Dream," Dec. 20) for breaking down cultural barriers and becoming a playwright of note, a writer of great social promise. One suggestion for Josefina: Do not be too anxious for your "ticket out of the barrio, out of the house, and out of old ideas," for it is the shouldering of these very "burdens" which is at the root and soul of your courageous stories, the fuel which powers your words of honesty and truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN, A new weekly column about people and events in the arts community, compiled by The Times' arts writers in San Diego
The 1987 winners of the California Young Playwrights Project have been announced, and three of the five are from San Diego. Four will have their scripts produced at the original Gaslamp Quarter Theatre: Karen Hartman (a repeat winner from last year), 17, from La Jolla High School; Rita Jeffries, 17, from Grossmont High School, and Josefina M. Lopez, 18, and Pamela Mshana, 18, both graduates of the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts.
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