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Joseildo Rocha

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SPORTS
March 8, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Marathon set off Sunday morning, with its 19,073 runners on a collision course with nature. Nature was the day's winner, in a blaze of sunshine and heat. The conditions for running 26.2 miles were far from optimal. Sunday's temperatures soared to near-record highs, topping out at 87 degrees at 1 p.m., about 20 degrees above normal and about 30 degrees higher than marathoners prefer. The heat produced the slowest times in the race's eight-year history.
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SPORTS
March 8, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Marathon set off Sunday morning, with its 19,073 runners on a collision course with nature. Nature was the day's winner, in a blaze of sunshine and heat. The conditions for running 26.2 miles were far from optimal. Sunday's temperatures soared to near-record highs, topping out at 87 degrees at 1 p.m., about 20 degrees above normal and about 30 degrees higher than marathoners prefer. The heat produced the slowest times in the race's eight-year history.
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SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | JIM HODGES
* WHEN: Today, 8:45 a.m. * TV: Channel 13 (8 a.m.) * RADIO: KACD/KBCD-FM 103.1 (6 a.m.) * WHERE: Starts at 6th and Figueroa streets; finishes at 8th and Figueroa. * COURSE: 26 miles 385 yards winding through the streets of Los Angeles. * PRIZE MONEY: $15,000 and a car to winners of men's and women's divisions.
SPORTS
March 3, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The L.A. Marathon lost one of its biggest sponsors last week when John Hancock Financial Services announced it will not be renewing its contract, which expired Monday. Race president William Burke said at the time that another major sponsor had been signed and the announcement would be made on race day. None was named, however, and on Monday, the day after the race, Burke said he expected to name the sponsor within two weeks.
SPORTS
March 2, 1992 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Treacy was so much younger then, so much more easily swayed by first impressions. In the summer of 1984, he ran his first marathon. He ran it in the Olympics. He ran it in 2:09.56. He walked away with a silver medal and then he had to wonder: Is that all there is? If that's a marathon, what's everybody whining about? There was no wall. There were no cramps. There was no delirium. Treacy said he kept waiting for it to become difficult. "Ignorance is bliss, know what I mean?"
SPORTS
March 6, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last John Treacy ran through the streets of Los Angeles, he was happily re-establishing himself in an event he had taken up, with instant success, in 1984. The first time here for the Irishman was the L.A. Olympics, where Treacy ran his first marathon and won a silver medal, to the astonishment of Olympic observers. But Treacy entered the 1992 Los Angeles Marathon after having gone years without a satisfying result.
SPORTS
March 4, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Marathon put up about 70 runners in local hotels, paid for about 50 of them to fly to the city and got Sunday's winner for the price of a phone call. Jose Luis Molina got into the race on Friday after a bit of confusion with his manager, then left everyone except Alfredo Vigueras of Mexico behind at the 20th mile and cruised across the finish line at the Los Angeles Central Library in 2 hours 13 minutes 23 seconds.
SPORTS
March 2, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first Sunday of March every year, the streets around the Coliseum echo with the strains of the signature song of the L.A. Marathon--Randy Newman's, "I Love L.A." Played in a continuous blare at the start, the song remained for most of the 20,000 runners more a suggestion than declaration. For John Treacy of Ireland and Madina Biktagirova of Belarus--the male and female winners of Sunday's seventh race--the song became an ode to their new favorite town.
SPORTS
March 4, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Marathon put up about 70 runners in local hotels, paid for about 50 of them to fly to the city and got Sunday's winner for the price of a phone call. Jose Luis Molina got into the race on Friday after a bit of confusion with his manager, then left all but aspiring American Alfredo Vigueras behind at the 20th mile and cruised across the finish line at the Los Angeles Central Library in 2 hours 13 minutes 23 seconds.
SPORTS
March 3, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nadezhda Ilyina won a 26-mile, 355-or-so-yard race in Los Angeles on Sunday. A few minutes later, Lornah Kiplagat learned she had won the 12th running of the Los Angeles Marathon. In a bizarre ending to a day of bizarrerie, Ilyina of Russia cut a corner in the race's 22nd mile, saved about 30 yards, but was cut out of the finishing field after being the apparent winner.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | SCOTT HARRIS and CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They numbered more than 19,000 strong, and from the swiftest of the wheelchair racers to the very last of the stragglers, they formed a 26.2-mile pageant of human willpower Sunday as the eighth Los Angeles marathon offered signs of hope for a city warily nearing the anniversary of last spring's riots.
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