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Joseph A Fernandez

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September 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Miami school Supt. Joseph A. Fernandez on Wednesday was named to head New York's public school system, the nation's largest and one beset by educational and criminal problems. Fernandez, a 53-year-old native New Yorker, will start as school chancellor in January or February and be paid $195,000 a year, Board of Education chief Robert Wagner Jr. said. "He will stand as a splendid role model," Wagner said.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES NEW YORK BUREAU CHIEF
New Yorkers vote today in a hotly contested local school board election--a race pitting some candidates supported by religious broadcaster Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition against liberal groups. In large measure, the election will be a referendum on policies of AIDS education, condom availability and the Rainbow Curriculum initiated by Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez, who was dismissed in February by the Board of Education after a bitter 4-3 vote.
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NEWS
February 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Board of Education voted Wednesday to oust Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez, who insisted that condoms be available in high schools and tried to teach grade-school students to be tolerant of homosexuals. "Good luck, God bless you. Maybe we didn't deserve you," Carl H. McCall, president of the Board of Education, told Fernandez after the board voted 4 to 3 not to renew his contract with the nation's largest school district.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Board of Education voted Wednesday to oust Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez, who insisted that condoms be available in high schools and tried to teach grade-school students to be tolerant of homosexuals. "Good luck, God bless you. Maybe we didn't deserve you," Carl H. McCall, president of the Board of Education, told Fernandez after the board voted 4 to 3 not to renew his contract with the nation's largest school district.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day he took office on Jan. 1, 1990, Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez tried to look out his office windows. The glass was so filthy, he was able to write his name in the dust. Underfoot, the carpet was littered with pieces of wire used to hook up a computer. Fernandez, head of the nation's largest school system, was told by his secretary that "the custodian says he only vacuums every third day."
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since taking charge as public schools chancellor here 18 months ago, Joseph A. Fernandez has dazzled New Yorkers with an astounding string of accomplishments. But as New York grapples with its most severe financial crisis since nearly going bankrupt in the mid-1970s, Fernandez's momentum is in danger of being severely arrested, if not reversed.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES NEW YORK BUREAU CHIEF
New Yorkers vote today in a hotly contested local school board election--a race pitting some candidates supported by religious broadcaster Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition against liberal groups. In large measure, the election will be a referendum on policies of AIDS education, condom availability and the Rainbow Curriculum initiated by Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez, who was dismissed in February by the Board of Education after a bitter 4-3 vote.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the early 1950s, the New York City school system failed with Joe Fernandez. Or maybe it was the other way around. There were probably teachers who tried to reach him, but none made much of an impression. Of all of them, he can remember only one by name: Mrs. Brown from third grade, who took him on his first trip to a museum. As a teen-ager in East Harlem, he hung out with a gang that called itself the Riffs.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
New York City officials called for racial harmony in the wake of a racial slaying trial that divided the city. Mayor David N. Dinkins pleaded for peace from a Harlem pulpit, saying racial tensions threaten to plunge the nation's biggest city into "a cycle of fear and frustration." Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez, appearing on a television talk show, announced the formation of a Blue Ribbon Committee for Racial Harmony.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
After months of debate and a last-minute compromise effort, the Board of Education voted Wednesday night to hand out condoms on request in the nation's largest school system, as part of a stepped up effort to fight AIDS. Condoms initially will be available at 30 to 35 schools, then phased in at the rest of the city's 120 schools, which enroll a total of 260,000 students.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day he took office on Jan. 1, 1990, Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez tried to look out his office windows. The glass was so filthy, he was able to write his name in the dust. Underfoot, the carpet was littered with pieces of wire used to hook up a computer. Fernandez, head of the nation's largest school system, was told by his secretary that "the custodian says he only vacuums every third day."
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since taking charge as public schools chancellor here 18 months ago, Joseph A. Fernandez has dazzled New Yorkers with an astounding string of accomplishments. But as New York grapples with its most severe financial crisis since nearly going bankrupt in the mid-1970s, Fernandez's momentum is in danger of being severely arrested, if not reversed.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the early 1950s, the New York City school system failed with Joe Fernandez. Or maybe it was the other way around. There were probably teachers who tried to reach him, but none made much of an impression. Of all of them, he can remember only one by name: Mrs. Brown from third grade, who took him on his first trip to a museum. As a teen-ager in East Harlem, he hung out with a gang that called itself the Riffs.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Miami school Supt. Joseph A. Fernandez on Wednesday was named to head New York's public school system, the nation's largest and one beset by educational and criminal problems. Fernandez, a 53-year-old native New Yorker, will start as school chancellor in January or February and be paid $195,000 a year, Board of Education chief Robert Wagner Jr. said. "He will stand as a splendid role model," Wagner said.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | PATRICIA HERSCH, American Health Magazine
When Joseph A. Fernandez, chancellor of New York City's board of education, said that high schools should make free condoms available without parental consent as part of an AIDS education program, the nation was stunned. To Fernandez, such a step was a matter of life and death: The city leads the nation in the number of adolescents with AIDS. Some saw him as a hero trying to save lives; others, as a preacher of promiscuity.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | MARY JORDAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Neil Lodato, a construction worker in Queens, was waving his arms and shouting outside his daughter's school, P.S. 13. "They should stick to teaching these babies that 1 plus 1 equals 2, instead of what daddy and his boyfriend are doing in the bedroom. "I learned about (homosexual couples) on the street, that's where she should, too," Lodato yelled, threatening to pull his 5-year-old daughter out of school if Schools Chancellor Joseph A. Fernandez gets his way.
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