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Joseph A Massey

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NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He speaks Japanese skillfully, eats sushi with his fingers--"the way you're supposed to"--and is fascinated by the Orient. At home, his living room is filled with Japanese paintings and red lacquer storage chests. Yet no one has ever branded Joseph A. Massey a member of the Chrysanthemum Club--the epithet that Japan's Washington critics have coined for government officials who "go easy" on Tokyo. To the contrary, Massey, an assistant U.S.
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NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He speaks Japanese skillfully, eats sushi with his fingers--"the way you're supposed to"--and is fascinated by the Orient. At home, his living room is filled with Japanese paintings and red lacquer storage chests. Yet no one has ever branded Joseph A. Massey a member of the Chrysanthemum Club--the epithet that Japan's Washington critics have coined for government officials who "go easy" on Tokyo. To the contrary, Massey, an assistant U.S.
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NEWS
June 29, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government can be expected to keep pushing exports to the United States and curtailing U.S. imports despite a record $10.4-billion U.S. trade deficit with China, the CIA predicted Friday. Even so, two Administration officials said the renewal of most-favored-nation status for China is essential to keep pressure on Beijing to adopt a more liberal trade policy that would help the United States gain markets there.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 35 years of politely asking Japan to open its market to U.S. products, the United States has turned to playing hardball--and the outcome, win or lose, could transform one of the world's most important relationships. All through the Cold War, governments in Tokyo often resisted U.S. pressure on trade, knowing that American presidents were more interested in maintaining military bases in Japan than selling automobile parts there. But that logic has changed.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the past few months, the Clinton Administration has been quietly negotiating with both the Chinese government and Congress to work out a formula for ending years of wrangling over the renewal of China's trade benefits in this country. Sources say the negotiations began last winter, when Secretary of State Warren Christopher told China's ambassador to Washington that he hoped Beijing would take steps to improve the country's human rights, trade and arms export policies.
WORLD
April 11, 2004 | Doyle McManus, Times Staff Writer
Vice President Dick Cheney arrived here Saturday to begin a weeklong visit to Japan and South Korea, two key allies; and China, a growing power that has become an unexpectedly close U.S. diplomatic partner. U.S. officials said Cheney's trip, his first to East Asia in more than three years as vice president, was aimed at shoring up American relationships in the area. His agenda includes issues ranging from Iraq -- to which Japan and South Korea have sent troops -- to North Korea.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President, Bill Clinton says he would transform American foreign policy--making economic competitiveness our main international goal, cracking down harder on foreign barriers to U.S. exports and promoting democracy's spread around the world. "We have to organize our thoughts, our policies and our government . . . (to) focus on the economic consequences of every decision we make, because that is the national security issue of the 1990s," the Democratic candidate declares.
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